Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, if your countertops are true Corian, rubbing compound, same as used on metal. To make sure, try a very small area that is normally covered. True Corian has the color all the way through the product and shines nicely with the above action, scratches can be sanded out then brought to a shine, of course use very fine paper if needed. Rejuvenate is only a coverup wax/finish product that will dull again in a short while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe

Amazon has Weiman Granite Cleaner and polish. we use it on our Corian it works well

 

Duane L

 American Eagle 45A

Pushed by 2014 Equinox or 2018 Sliverado Duramax

M&G Brakes on both

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kay, they are Corian all the way through. Surprised me when I had to modify the well for the Induction cook top 3 years ago, wasn't easy to get through. 

It's dull in the high usage areas and has a slight shine near the outer edges, anyone that knows me understands how much that is driving me crazy. Our coach looks like a show piece inside and I am fighting to keep it that way.

Thank you everyone for the suggestions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What you use depends on what type of surface you desire.

If matte finish,  medium 3M scotch pads.

A little shinier, rubbing compound.

Gloss, polishing compound.

 

And, each of those are the "finishing" product.  You can start with wet dry sandpaper used wet to remove scratches. If lots of very small scratches, 1000 grit is a good choice.  If deeper scratches, start with courser grit and work finer.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, a call to your local countertop dealer can tell you what to use. Most countertop places make custom made countertops with Corian. After they remove the top from the molds they polish and shine them.

If yours are in really bad shape you may even hire them to come out and recondition them for you.$$$

Herman

(Or you could add several hundreds pounds of weight to the coach and have them replaced with Granite.):rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, hermanmullins said:

If yours are in really bad shape you may even hire them to come out and recondition them for you.$$$

They look great, just no deep shine.

56 minutes ago, wolfe10 said:

Gloss, polishing compound.

That's the end result desired.

Here are some photo's of the current appearance. 

Counter_1.jpg

Counter_2.jpg

Counter_Left.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be aware that the more the shine (finer the final grit used to polish) the more easily it will show new scratches.

Matte finish is the most forgiving.

Certainly personal preference-- as with most things-- trade-offs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't polished the counter tops but I think it wouldn't be that different from polishing fiberglass gel coat. Remember the surface is relatively soft. Here is a video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WmVQwkgcMk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtwxR0b7F7I

I would use a random orbit polisher to help prevent swirls in the finish.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When working with Corian, for really bad jobs (Joe's are not that bad), I used a straight line air file with wet sandpaper, no swirls. I built cabinets as a trade for over 12 years and bought and resold Corian during that time. A DA (dual action) tool works well on random curves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine is gloss, looks great, but shows dust or scratches easier!  

Herman, that was for re-Finnish...lesson learned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did locate the product I mentioned above. It is Gel Gloss. It is available at Walmart, Lowe’s and Home Depot plus I am sure many other outlets. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, rossboyer said:

I did locate the product I mentioned above. It is Gel Gloss. It is available at Walmart, Lowe’s and Home Depot plus I am sure many other outlets. 

I am familiar with that product. I used it on the last Motorhome (no full paint) and my old boat. Both are gone now, I might still have some around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, what was yours when you bought the coach?  As Kay said, it does not look bad, just no luster (dull)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, manholt said:

Joe, what was yours when you bought the coach?  As Kay said, it does not look bad, just no luster (dull)!

Counters are in great shape, just dull, everything else inside has a deep rich shine except those counters and it drives me nuts.

We use cutting boards and cutting mats, so nothing really touches the surface other than a toaster, toaster oven and the Keurig and those all have rubber feet. I treat the interior of the coach like its fragile china, I forced myself into that habit with the first RV that was all particle board and plastic, everything you touched broke and crumbled. No need now but old habits still exist and whomever owned this unit before must have taken the same approach. when we bought it the interior looked like it was staged for sale with all sorts or decorative stuff placed all through out and secured down with Quake putty.

I just touched up the wood stain two weeks ago and applied wood treatment to keep the hardwoods fresh all throughout the interior. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Different strokes, Linda likes your counter top as is. :blink:  She said that your back-splash needs more zing! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, here is what I recommend, in your case.

Polishing Compound

Polishing compound is a substance that is mildly abrasive. It is used to remove contaminants from the paint and will also smooth the paint by removing a small amount of paint. Polishing compound will remove light scratches in the finish of an automobile.

 

Rubbing Compound

Rubbing compound works in a similar manner to polishing compound, but is more abrasive. This means that the rubbing compound will remove more paint and is used for smoothing out larger scratches and other significant damage to the vehicle's painted surface.

Tips for Use

As polishing compound is less abrasive, it should be used first to correct problems with a vehicle's finish. If the polishing compound does not provide a satisfactory result, the more abrasive rubbing compound can then be used. Polishing compound may be needed after the use of rubbing compound to smooth out the paint.

In your case I would use a lambs wool bonnet on a medium speed buffer first, if not adequate, then a sailcloth bonnet with the green rubbing compound, I buy it dry use a mortar and petal to crush then a few drops of kerosene to form a paste, when this process is complete then I go to white compound in the same manner. Kerosene, not diesel fuel, diesel will discolor, kerosene will not. By the way the same treatment on granite or marble works well for a lasting shine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...