Jump to content
Factor

Education

Recommended Posts

All:

I like to learn and read.¬† So I am looking for good books on Diesel engines in general.¬† I am technicall enough to rebuild a gas engine and it work¬†ūüė鬆I am not wanting to be a Mechanic or go to school.¬† Just something to help me understand more and even go over rebuilding.¬† ¬† I look forward to your suggestions.¬†¬†
 

@jleamont Joe do you have recommendations. Everyone said you are the best resource. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry Factor, reading instruction tho being helpful, does not replace actual experience. Reading books does not make an expert. It takes actual hands on to actually gain experience. As an example, I had a good friend that would read everything about a welding machine but could not even turn it on. 

Please understand I am not discouraging you from asking questions but it will never help you till you have an RV and have an issue then is when someone can help..

So my advice would be to get an RV of some sort, use it and find out the issues and pleasure of owning an RV.    

Herman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Herman, 

You won't discourage me.¬† Yes, I agree experience is the best teacher..¬† I to have friends that cannot turn on a welder or hammer a nail.¬† However, knowledge is power. There are people who do and there are people who do not.¬† Mostly all of that is the unwillingness to try and or learn.¬† On the contrary of your point I am a trained Emergency room Nurse.¬† I have studied countless books and saved thousands of lives.¬† It was a culmination of both Books and Experience.¬† They wouldn't let me practice on Humans until I¬†read the books practiced and took tests.¬†ūüėĬ†

As I stated "I am not wanting to be a Mechanic or go to school.  Just something to help me understand more and even go over rebuilding."

I will get an RV when I can and sure to enjoy it.  The DW is not ready yet and I am still interested in reading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, campcop said:

An online course on Diesel engines would be a good start.

Link?  Ones you have taken?  Books?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Factor, send a PM (Personal Message) to Joe L. just click on his Avatar, click on message!  Your about the same age!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I can search Google https://www.google.com/search?ei=m-sYXvfTIMmOggfUwYmQBQ&q=books+on+diesel+engine+repair&oq=books+diesel+engine&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.0i7i30l2j0i8i30l8.4256.5775..8472...0.2..0.66.362.6......0....1..gws-wiz.......0i71j0i13j0i8i7i30.z6mNfKaejhQ

I was kind of hoping you all might have a recommendation of a good choice.  One you all like, trust or read already.

1 hour ago, manholt said:

PM (Personal Message) to Joe L.

I don't find a username here as Joe L.  

880315188_ScreenShot2020-01-10at15_29_32.thumb.png.f4661ee181674915a083ff57d17ecbfc.png

Also I am not that Young I am Fifty..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, as a teacher of the "care and feeding" of diesel powered motorhomes, you (Factor and Herman) are both correct.

Absolutely, the learning process is a combination of  "book learning" and hands on experience.  The process is no different than learning how to maintain any other complex machine.

I can teach someone the importance of changing the fuel filter(s) and what micron rating filters to buy for their application, but until they do the hands on of locating the filter(s), changing them and priming the system, it is of limited value.

Joe Leamont: https://community.fmca.com/profile/39881-jleamont/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, wolfe10 said:

Actually, as a teacher of the "care and feeding" of diesel powered motorhomes, you (Factor and Herman) are both correct.

Absolutely, the learning process is a combination of  "book learning" and hands on experience.  The process is no different than learning how to maintain any other complex machine.

I can teach someone the importance of changing the fuel filter(s) and what micron rating filters to buy for their application, but until they do the hands on of locating the filter(s), changing them and priming the system, it is of limited value.

Joe Leamont: https://community.fmca.com/profile/39881-jleamont/

Correct and Thank you. 

No recommendations on books? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a tough one. Most training beyond basic maintenance typically starts with basic electrical. That’s assuming the person has enough of a mechanical aptitude to absorb that and not just burn through multimeter fuses. Then you advance onward into another area, could be HVAC, basic hydraulics (to prep for automatic transmissions) or engine basics and fundamentals. Personally I prefer to feel out someone on gas engines as they are significantly safer and easier to work on than a modern diesel.
Due to today’s high fuel pressures and high voltage on a Diesel engine there is a HUGE safety section in the beginning so you don’t permanently injure yourself or worse. You could easily destroy a several thousand dollar wiring harness from probing a data bus line with a multimeter thinking you were chasing a problem. 
In the old days you searched for a fuel leak by touch, you do that today you could easily earn a new nickname ‚Äúone arm John‚ÄĚ. A stream of fuel pressure at 50,000 psi would be similar to a Water jet cutter.¬†
The electrical and software side is another skill that most Master Technicians struggle with. Not uncommon for a modern diesel to die on the side of the road with several thousand ‚Äúghost‚ÄĚ fault codes and it only needs a software update. For this reason I always recommend the engine manufacturer touch it at a minimum of once a year to keep the software fresh. This service requires expensive dealer level software that on DIY‚Äôer would ever consider purchasing or¬†paying for the annual license.
I cannot count how many times I have watched the best try and troubleshoot the codes and hang parts that weren’t needed only to call tech support and find out it just needs a software update.
We have technology today that sends me an email to determine if it needs urgent attention or if it can wait, listing the fault codes and descriptions. Pretty impressive, I can tell if the DEF is in the tank is contaminated from hundred miles away sitting in my office. That requires a lot of delicate components all talking to each other.
If it were me I’d attend maintenance seminars first. Perhaps a local technology center might offer classes for beginners and take it from there. 
Keep in mind sometimes you just have to leave items to the pros. If and this is a huge IF you can locate one, even at the dealer level.

If it was 1998 or before this would be much, much easier to tackle, the industry is advancing daily! 
Ending thought;¬†I had an instructor that preached ‚Äúa screwdriver in the wrong hand can do an incredible amount of damage‚ÄĚ!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All:

I am sorry for the confusion I apparently created with this topic.  @jleamont Thank you for the detailed response.  Also thank you for the hidden nugget of advice.  Which is get the Firmware updated in your Diesel engines computer every now and then.   That is the ESM? 

54 minutes ago, jleamont said:

engine basics and fundamentals.

On 1/10/2020 at 11:55 AM, Factor said:

I am looking for good books on Diesel engines in general.

This is all I am looking for..

54 minutes ago, jleamont said:

Keep in mind sometimes you just have to leave items to the pros.

I agree for sure.   I am looking to read books to help me make these choices.  Example: Do I need a pro to change oil? OR Replace a fuel injector OR both.  In short it is about informed decision making and just wanting to know something about diesel engines, just because I like to know..  In the old days we called them Book Worms.

54 minutes ago, jleamont said:

If and this is a huge IF you can locate one, even at the dealer level.

This is actually more scary to me...  Isn't the Diesel Mechanic/Technician/Professional Trained and Licensed.  I am really asking because I have no idea.  If the diesel engine is so complicated and scary like everyone seem to say it is.  Seems like this would require strict training, testing and licensure.  Now if you just mean find a seasoned veteran mechanic vs a greenhorn I get it.  Don't they all have the same License and pass the same test?  Isn't there a National Database I can go look up a Good well train shop in?

Just to be clear I don't mean anything in a bad light.  Sometimes my over inquisitive, logical brain makes people angry.  Think of me as the poor kid that asks "but why does this happen?" "Is the stove hot?" 

It is crazy at 50 yo I still like learning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The diesel engines when from pretty simple to extremely complex as EPA emission specs tightened.

2004 and 2007 were times (engines produced 1/1/2004 and 1/1/2007) when emission specs tightened, leading to more complex systems to control emissions.

Note, you could have a 2004 or even early 2005 coach with 2003 engine, as many chassis makers bought ahead knowing that the newer engines would be more complex and more expensive.  And, after the chassis is built, it may sit for awhile before a coach is built on it.

Engine serial number is the best way to get relevant information on the engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Factor, that link is what I use still today. It does not address normal maintenance,it is however a very thorough explanation of how a compression-igniton engine works, why and theories involved.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this is the kind of knowledge you're looking for, but a good intro to heavy vehicles is actually your state's CDL manual, especially the sections 2.1 (Vehicle Inspections) and 5 (Air Brakes). Section 11 (Pre-Trip Inspection) is also good to read through. This won't give you detailed knowledge of the systems, but it is a great intro level resource. The main purpose of these sections is to provide new drivers a basic level of knowledge needed for safe operation, and it might serve as a launching point of sorts for you to see what it is you are going to need to know besides just the engine. I've also found some of this checklist type knowledge helpful in looking at vehicles I'm going to purchase. (If it can't pass a pre-trip inspection, repairs are needed.)

Another route, especially since you have time till you purchase something, is to check your local community college or technical college (or what ever they're called in your area). They often offer training programs on things like diesel engines, and sometimes even have non-credit short-term programs aimed at the general population.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These days you can find anything on the net...not the same as hands on, but you get to keep your hands!  There is a huge difference (learning curve) between DD 8V71 and today's Cummings X 15... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/11/2020 at 4:46 PM, Factor said:

This is all I am looking for..

An RV maintenance seminar should cover this type of basic service. Monaco has one coming up in Indiana.

 

On 1/11/2020 at 4:46 PM, Factor said:

Isn't the Diesel Mechanic/Technician/Professional Trained and Licensed.

Not necessarily. Some have proper credentials that if you ask them or look on the wall in the service write up area (probably posted). A lot of places will take the "greenhorn" and throw them to the wolves to see how they work out, that's when it can get scary for the consumer, his or her errors can become your nightmares!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In teaching RV preventive maintenance, my mantra is:

YOU are responsible for knowing what needs to be done and when-- whether you choose to do it yourself or hire it out."

Have seen way too many examples of folks taking an RV into a dealership and saying-- do what needs to be done.  That is virtually guaranteed to result in things being done that don't need to be done AND skipping things that are due. 

How is a tech supposed to know when the last time your coolant was changed (or even what chemistry coolant you have). Air dryer changed last year or a decade ago? Etc, Etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/11/2020 at 3:46 PM, Factor said:

I am sorry for the confusion I apparently created with this topic.

That is ok I am confused a lot anyway. 

I think what you are  trying to do is gain information on how to take care of a diesel. You said you knew gas engins, well diesel is not that different. I would shift more towards maintenance.  That to is pretty simple. 

I think Brett is right on the money. 

Bill

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...