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Towing A Smart Car

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https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/?1dmy&urile=wcm:path:/dmv_content_en/dmv/pubs/dl648/dl648pt12

Trailer Brakes_

In California, brakes are required on any trailer coach or camp trailer having a gross weight of 1500 lbs. or more. Usually the braking capacity on tow vehicles is good; however, it may not be good enough to safely stop the several hundred to several thousand additional pounds that your trailer weighs. Most conventional and fifth-wheel trailers have electric brakes, activated by a controller in the tow vehicle. The controller automatically coordinates the tow vehicle and trailer braking so the two systems work together when the brake pedal is applied.

The controller can also be helpful in stabilizing a trailer that sways because of bad road conditions. Manually applying the trailer brakes by using the hand lever on the controller will stabilize a trailer that is likely to sway.

Folding camp trailers and boat trailers are usually fitted with surge brake systems which operate separately from the tow vehicle's brakes.

Surge brakes are applied by a mechanism attached to the receiver/ball connection. As the tow vehicle slows, the forward motion of the trailer compresses the mechanism which in turn applies the trailer brakes.

Motorcycle trailers do not need brakes unless the weight exceeds 1500 pounds gross. If you install brakes on your motorcycle trailer, be sure the brakes do not brake harder than the motorcycle or the motorcycle may flip backwards over the trailer when the brakes are applied. The brakes must always be properly adjusted.

 

Maybe you should re-read the laws concerning trailers and motorcycle trailers in California, the link provided above is from the California DMV, you can do your own search or follow the link above, it states motorcycle trailers do not need brakes unless gross weight exceeds 1500#. I'm not trying to argumentative, only pointing out that different states have different rules concerning these type of situations. If you live in California, you should know the law, but it is hard to contradict the rules that are stated in your own states DMV publications regarding these circumstances.

You may never be stopped or checked, but in the event of an accident you should know that your insurance carrier may refuse to  pay a claim if you are not in compliance with the laws in the state that you are operating within. Good luck, when in doubt, check it out.

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8 hours ago, kaypsmith said:

https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/?1dmy&urile=wcm:path:/dmv_content_en/dmv/pubs/dl648/dl648pt12

Trailer Brakes_

In California, brakes are required on any trailer coach or camp trailer having a gross weight of 1500 lbs. or more. Usually the braking capacity on tow vehicles is good; however, it may not be good enough to safely stop the several hundred to several thousand additional pounds that your trailer weighs. Most conventional and fifth-wheel trailers have electric brakes, activated by a controller in the tow vehicle. The controller automatically coordinates the tow vehicle and trailer braking so the two systems work together when the brake pedal is applied.

The controller can also be helpful in stabilizing a trailer that sways because of bad road conditions. Manually applying the trailer brakes by using the hand lever on the controller will stabilize a trailer that is likely to sway.

Folding camp trailers and boat trailers are usually fitted with surge brake systems which operate separately from the tow vehicle's brakes.

Surge brakes are applied by a mechanism attached to the receiver/ball connection. As the tow vehicle slows, the forward motion of the trailer compresses the mechanism which in turn applies the trailer brakes.

Motorcycle trailers do not need brakes unless the weight exceeds 1500 pounds gross. If you install brakes on your motorcycle trailer, be sure the brakes do not brake harder than the motorcycle or the motorcycle may flip backwards over the trailer when the brakes are applied. The brakes must always be properly adjusted.

 

Maybe you should re-read the laws concerning trailers and motorcycle trailers in California, the link provided above is from the California DMV, you can do your own search or follow the link above, it states motorcycle trailers do not need brakes unless gross weight exceeds 1500#. I'm not trying to argumentative, only pointing out that different states have different rules concerning these type of situations. If you live in California, you should know the law, but it is hard to contradict the rules that are stated in your own states DMV publications regarding these circumstances.

You may never be stopped or checked, but in the event of an accident you should know that your insurance carrier may refuse to  pay a claim if you are not in compliance with the laws in the state that you are operating within. Good luck, when in doubt, check it out.

maybe not, that is not all from dmv, but since I took my trailer and car to dmv, and to the chp and had them ok the trailer, and since they sell trailers for this purpose, I will agree to disagree 

 

CALIFORNIA

Every trailer and semitrailer manufactured after 1940 with a GVW of 6,000 lbs. or more and operated at a speed of 20 mph or more must be equipped with brakes; trailers and semitrailers built after 1966 and with a GVW of 3,000 lbs. or more must have brakes on at least 2 wheels; every trailer or semitrailer built after 1982 and equipped with air brakes must be equipped with brakes on all wheels.

Every trailer coach or camp trailer with a GVW of 1,500 lbs. or more must be equipped with brakes on at least 2 wheels.

 

DONE WITH POST

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Auxiliary  break system for a toad or trailer, is cheap insurance, should something go wrong!  Your fault or their fault, you'll be paying for both if your not in minimum compliance!  It does not matter if your home State is 1,000# or 20,000#...being legal in all State's and Canada is the issue!!!  

 

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5 hours ago, hammer55 said:

 

DONE WITH POST

You may be done with the post, but I only stated what California DMV is currently posting. I don't know how old your information is but laws are subject to change from time to time. My son in-law is a retired deputy sheriff, and his son my grandson is currently a deputy in our county, neither of them really know the actual law at any given time. The purpose of this forum is to make anyone who wants to know about a current issue get familiar with the circumstances for what they are inquiring. Most of us feel that the correct answers should be given and if not others can correct them, this is all that I am doing is correcting your misstatement regarding 3000# maximum is the law. All states are not the same and all inquiring have the right to know the correct answer to their question. Have a great day!

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Good response, Kay. As we all know, there is a lot of erroneous information on the web and many times it takes some digging to get to the real facts. Of course, by human nature we all want to hear what we believe...right or wrong.

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There is reciprocity for driver licenses but rules of the road and safety are State by State. You my have a lower limit in your state but don't leave the state as the next state over may be different,

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21 minutes ago, wayne77590 said:

There is reciprocity for driver licenses but rules of the road and safety are State by State. You my have a lower limit in your state but don't leave the state as the next state over may be different.

100% ACCURATE!

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