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jfxg48

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About jfxg48

  • Birthday April 9

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    presently..... Salt Lake City
  • Interests
    flying, reading(historic non-fiction, spy novels), boats, woodworking
  • I travel
    With Pets
    Full-time in my motorhome

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  1. I've had the TST in service for a year. I think you'll find it very satisfactory. One tip... when initially setting up the unit, follow their suggestion and set your high and low parameter limits *before* configuring each individual wheel. If you set the wheels first, you'll have all sorts of alarm triggers going off *while* you're trying to set your parameters. Aggravating. And, if you do encounter any difficulties, don't hesitate to call them. Incredibly friendly and cooperative folks! Good Luck
  2. We left Raleigh a year ago, and our first planned destination was eastern MA and Cape Cod to visit family. Where in NC will you originate? That will, of course, determine your route and any advice. One caution I would make (right out of the gate) is to not set your daily distance expectations too high. Enjoy the trip, not only the destinations.
  3. Thanks, Tireman... Apparently, aiming an IR gun at the sidewall is about the most useless thing you can do! Makes me feel smart! It looks like the inner rubber along the outer tread band is where the heat builds. So what are we to do? Is there any way to get a valid sense of critical tire temps? I recall a post of yours a while back mentioning 157 degrees as a critical point. At the time I was measuring sidewall temps of about 130 with an IR gun, thinking I was fine. Is there any reliable correlation? Another: when my TST system measures temperature, what is it measuring? Air temp of the air in the filler tube? Temp of the tube metal itself? And another: a few weeks ago I was climbing long grades (max elev change was about 4000 ft) in 95 degree heat. Tire pressure had been set at the low elevation. My high pressure trigger is set at +20lb, I was getting alarms on 3 or 4 tires. I'm presuming this was predominantly from the heat, since my brain tells me that the absolute pressure within the tire should be unchanged with elevation. Is my brain wrong? Thanks!
  4. Just saw this today, and that was my first thought, too, when I saw the photo... they've not even finished the pour! Looks to me like all will be fine when the driveway's complete. The garage slab is already at finished grade, and should be sloping outward. I don't even see a drainage issue. Temporary ramps or fill should do the trick until the final pour. You can probably eliminate the low spot with the pour as well, if so desired. Am I missing something?
  5. Oh, you were sweating alright..... you just didn't feel it because it evaporates so quickly. That's why and how dehydration is such a real and insidious problem in desert climates. Glad you enjoyed the trip!
  6. I know its outside your target, but just for reference we were in western SD, Black Hills, and Mt. Rushmore last year in late October. Extremely pleasant; not crowded at all; cool brisk nights for sleeping, shirtsleeve or very light jacket weather in daytime.
  7. I've been towing a Honda Element for a year now, with a Roadmaster Sterling and an RVi brake system. No problems, easy hookup, easy off. I pop two pins and the whole front assembly slides right off the car. If we're just overnight I'll leave it on going to the store or whatnot, and against all odds I've managed to walk around the front without bumping into my own car. ;-)
  8. UTT.... Don't obsess too much on the driving. A little practice will teach you a lot. If you've ever transitioned from a VW to a full-sized SUV, then you've assimilated a major size shift. You just have to learn where your corners are. In addition the the RV related suggestions from others, check for commercial driver training in your area. If you can take training for an interstate charter bus , your motorhome won't seem much different. Regarding brands: as you shop you will learn the brand mames with the good reps and the respect of the industry. Tiffin is a very well respected name, and there are others. If you will be full-timing, I'd suggest selecting the highest quality you can reasonably target, then back off in age until you can afford it. I settled on this strategy shortly after we started looking, and it helped tremendously by narrowing the search early in the process. I also found the RV Consumer Group to be a very worthwhile investment. I would highly recommend a membership. They have developed a rating system based on quality and fitness for a particular usage, so you can promptly focus only on those models suitable for fulltiming. Check www.rv.org . Good Luck with it all, and keep us posted. I'm also former USAF-- the only branch with a perfect record: we've never yet left one up there! John & Diane 2002 Newmar Dutch Star 40DP
  9. bmccann and others..... I have a weight disparity similar to the OP that I've been pondering for a while now. When I got corner weighed at the FMCA Eastern Rally last Oct in York I was actually quite pleased. The coach was 590lb under gross (30410/31000). Weighing was done with full fuel, propane; half-full fresh, gray, and black. Front axle was 250lb under (11750/12000), and the front tires were even within 30 lbs. Rear axle was 340lb under max (18660//19000) but my right rear dual was about 540lb heavier than the left (L9060 / R9600). I aired up per Michelin's chart for the heavier side, and have had no problem for the ensuing 3000 miles as we made our way to Puget Sound for the winter. With the rear air balanced at the inflation for the heavier right side my left dual is running slightly underloaded, so that's OK. According to my tpms the pressures stayed balanced and the temps were all consistent and well below any problem areas. I had no handling problems, no drifting, no lean, no scary moments with trucks. But I keep thinking about that. I don't think there's any way I could shift or compensate for that much weight, because a) there's no place on the left rear to store much, and I have about 400lb of battery and rack-2 engine and 6 house- mounted right there at the right rear. Some of that ought to have been balanced by the left-side bedroom slide mechanism, but apart from that the only left rear bays are the electric and water service bays. I've pretty much concluded that this is something I'll just have to live with. Sooo...... What am I missing? Thanks.
  10. You've probably read what I posted just last night in another thread, but I'll repeat: "...I've towed our 2004 Element ( AWD / auto trans) about 5000 miles so far with no problem. In the 2004 Owners Manual there is a procedure outlined to prep for flat towing. Its my understanding that in about 2005 or 2006, Honda stopped including this procedure in Element manuals, tacitly prohibiting the flat tow without a specific prohibition. But there was no technical change to the vehicle that would warrant such a policy change. It is the opinion of many owners that this was simply a move by the Honda USA legal department to try to sidestep any future potential liability. I know of several post-2005 owners who flat tow Elements with no problems, following the pre-2005 procedure..."
  11. UPDATE ON THE RVi SYSTEM We've now been using the RVi system for about four months. We left Raleigh, went to Cape Cod, and we're now in Everett, WA. We've put about 5000 miles on our coach, and the toad has been attached for about 4800 of them. I've developed a startup routine, so the daily trip start is now even simpler and easier. We have had not one lick of difficulty from the RVi. I know its working, as there have been a few braking events where I could feel the toad resistance kick in. I would recommend this system, or purchase another, in a heartbeat.
  12. I bought the TST system with 10 flow-through sensors last July. The first monitor panel wouldn't accept programming, and the folks at TST had a new one in my hands gratis within two days. About a couple of months later one of my sensors developed an air leak. A TST distributor at the FMCA rally at York swapped it no problem. The system works well, and I'm quite pleased. I purchased a signal booster with my initial order, but have never needed it. Good strength from toad wheels behind our 40 ft coach. The only thing I've noticed that I might call a negative is that adding/subtracting air through the sensors is a bit slower than through a straight valve.
  13. I've towed our 2004 Element ( AWD / auto trans) about 5000 miles so far with no problem. In the 2004 Owners Manual there is a procedure outlined to prep for flat towing. Its my understanding that in about 2005 or 2006, Honda stopped including this procedure in Element manuals, tacitly prohibiting the flat tow without a specific prohibition. But there was no technical change to the vehicle that would warrant such a policy change. It is the opinion of many owners that this was simply a move by the Honda USA legal department to try to sidestep any future potential liability. I know of several post-2005 owners who flat tow Elements with no problems, following the pre-2005 procedure.
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