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Punxsyjumper

Hand tools, Craftsman or Snap On or ???

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18 hours ago, manholt said:

I'm not close to being very handy with tools.  I like and have both Kobalt and Craftsman!  For power tools, I have Milwaukee! 

My SO Linda, has enough tools to make Joe L. green with envy...Her deceased husband was a Mechanical and Electrical Engineer who had a water drilling business and was a well known gun smith!  Tools for every occasion...all Snap-On!  He also made his own tools for special projects.  You want to light up like the 4th off July, come and steal.  :lol:

Don't have much experience with the Kobalt but sounds like they deserve a second look. Pretty much grew up with Craftsman but they never did make a good power tool. Like you, Milwaukee Red for sure. When I was doing security work, I made some of my own tools as well. Thanks Carl

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Most wrenches today are forged with tolerances to allow for plating. A thousands of an inch too much will make the tool loose and as was said there goes the hex head. I have some very old wrenches that were US made and before shining and they still fit snug and show no sign of wear.

Herman

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10 hours ago, jleamont said:

I carry this kit (older version) with some other miscellaneous tools in the coach. At home I have all of my hand tools from when I was a mechanic, including some shop tools from when I owned the mobile truck repair business.  Home tools are mostly Snap-on and MAC, coach tools are mostly older Craftsman. In the coach I like this type of kit so its all inclusive. 

https://www.google.com/search?q=craftsman+tool+kits&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixz_Gg28jZAhVjs1kKHf2jB8kQ_AUICygC&biw=1344&bih=726#imgrc=eR14LUWIiBTNrM:

 

Looks like a good set up, thanks

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5 hours ago, hermanmullins said:

Richard,

You are correct about Snap-On. They do cater to the mechanics in shops. However if you see one of their trucks at a shop or dealer you can go in and buy any tool you want. One of the main differences is each mechanic has an account with the individual Snap-No dealer. You would need to pay with cash or CC. I got my first Tool Box in 1964 and my son in Wyoming has it on his work bench today A good Snap-On dealer can make some really good money.

I also have several Proto tools still.

You can also buy from a Matco truck the same as Snap-On. 

Herman

Yep, thanks Herman

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3 hours ago, kaypsmith said:

A friend of mine bought a complete set of Snap On tools through his employer, an aircraft rebuilder, he paid the employer through payroll deduction nearly two thousand dollars for that set of tools. After he retired, he no longer needed this large set of tools and sold me the complete set for a couple hundred dollars. On of the ratchets was in need of repair, I found a Snap On truck and asked the driver to replace or repair the tool. He took it from my hand, looked it over, then he told me that I could not have it back, because he was required to confiscate it, there was a G in the number of the tool. His claim was that it was a government issued tool and it was against the law for me to have it in my possession. The aircraft company was not owned or run by the government, and I know for a fact that the tools were not stolen by my friend, but none the less I lost the ratchet. All the tools in the set had a G in the number marking, so I can not have those tools repaired or replaced. I personally like the Kobalt brand better than Craftsman tools in these times.

That's good to know if I happen to pick some up at a yard sale. Thanks

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Forgot to mention, the Husky hand wrenches at Home Depot were made by Snap on, different specifications, actually closer to the Snap on tier two product, labeled "Blue Point". I asked a Snap on dealer that once, he admitted it but tried to talk his way out of it.

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But if there is a lifetime warranty what would be the problem if 3 year down the road it broke?

Example: We purchased a coffee maker at Bed Bath and Beyond. Took the maker and the receipt back to BB&B and they replaced it. Not only that but the price had dropped and they refunded me the difference.

I have not broken a tool so I'm just waiting for the day.

 

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The problem with having a tool with a lifetime warranty is what good is it if the company goes out of business. Sears is on a down hill spiral because of the current ownership.

I do see Ace Hardware is now carrying most of the Craftsman line of hand tools. 

Bill

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On 2/28/2018 at 3:32 PM, campcop said:

I know this may not be popular but has anyone looked at the hand tools offered by Harbor Freight? They now sell polished wrenches that are in my opinion just as good as Craftsman and look like Snap-on and at a significantly lower cost

I've gotten a couple of their tools when I needed one for a certain job.  Their warranty is the same as everybody's...break it, bring it in and they'll give you a new one.  Also, Craftsman is now carried in the military exchanges.

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On ‎2‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 3:12 PM, hermanmullins said:

Most wrenches today are forged with tolerances to allow for plating. A thousands of an inch too much will make the tool loose and as was said there goes the hex head. I have some very old wrenches that were US made and before shining and they still fit snug and show no sign of wear.

Herman

I agree, had some old stuff that was handed down to me. May not be the prettiest but they sure do get the job done. Thanks Herman

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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 2:38 PM, timetraveler said:

I am at a loss, at the moment, for the termanology but China makes Consumables not durable goods. The new standard like light bulbs is to engineer an item to last  just so long, so you will have to buy another. I first noticed the new principle when GE after the Berlin Wall fell bought, bought the Polish Light bulb Manufacturers.  In decades prior you bought a US made bub and it might last like the one we put on Mama's porch around 1960. It lasted until one o us doing some painting broke it around 2005. It is normal or us to replace a dozen bulbs every 6 months. And it now costs a lot as the LEDs are the only one's that last any time.

Consumerism not Durable Goods.

In the case of Harbor Freight they are made or a price point and are lesser quality in material and durability. They may last the average person who is working on vehicles etc daily a long time but you can't count on it and the warranties on most everything today is a joke.

Use to be quality and long life , service etc was what sold. Wall Street says servicability, service and warranty doesn't make them any money today. They want as much sales as possible and lower quality and no warranty, or Consumerism makes the most money for them. You buy one and it fails you have to buy another.

Bought a handheld gas blower from Sears several years ago, expecting the typical lifetime warranty. It worked for a short time and took it back. 100.00 for finding the probllem and 69.00 to repair it. I paid 69.00 for it. I no longer need to use my tools mostly but have  a double chest of quality, lifetime warranty, which is no longer any good, tools. Have a small rachet that need repair. They said buy a new one , that in my book is junk.

I had a Craftsman 1/2" ratchet that failed on me about 15 years ago. Took it in to Sears for a replacement and the dude took a rebuilt on off the rack by the register. This thing looked like somebody kicked it across the floor a few times. I refused to take it and said where is my new one? Said they don't do that anymore. Got the store manager and went around with him for a few times but he eventually went over and got a brand new one and handed it to me. Maybe just to get rid of me but I did get a new ratchet. Thanks

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On 3/13/2018 at 10:40 AM, Punxsyjumper said:

I had a Craftsman 1/2" ratchet that failed on me about 15 years ago. Took it in to Sears for a replacement and the dude took a rebuilt on off the rack by the register. This thing looked like somebody kicked it across the floor a few times. I refused to take it and said where is my new one? Said they don't do that anymore. Got the store manager and went around with him for a few times but he eventually went over and got a brand new one and handed it to me. Maybe just to get rid of me but I did get a new ratchet. Thanks

I don't remember the year but one of my Craftsman's ratchets broke some teeth on the pall. Took it in and Mgr went in back and brought a white box our with the whole internals. Removed the old and snapped them in.

I guess Store Mgr is involved in some o these situations. My store, I would rebuild it or replace it . Guarantees repeat happy Customers, who spread thee word on how great they take care of their Customers and much more in sales.

Satisfaction brings expectation o good quality and great service in everything else they sell.

Remember when we bought boats and motors and all our fishing tackle, and firearms, ammo and hunting duds  etc at Sears, and everything else.

Well the Bozo who now is driving into the ground, decided he was only going to carry PC items like WalMart clothes, and bed spreads and some cheap electronics and washing machines still, but higher prices and warranty is good or toilet paper after a year.

We bought our first washer and dryer for 212.00. It lasted from 1971 til about 2000 when I broke the washer.

Two sets since then at ten times the cost and repairs equal to purchase price on last set.

Those Craftsman ratchets handle design was comfortable  up to maybe a hundred pounds of torque or all day use. those smaller diameter round ones, typical everywhere  serrated or whatever, those little teeth are brutal, on the hands, unless it is just one fastener and it is not stuck.

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Ahh, the good old days!  Pre high tech and computerized Plasma Cutters in 3D.  The USA made tools and goods, that was the envy of the World.  Your Grandkids and their kids, will have no clue what we are talking about, by their time, they will have no use for the tools or ability to re build an engine!  It will all be Robotics...:(

You might say, no!  But who among us, can make and fix a wagon wheel of wood and a metal band?  Build a sound and tight log house, from scratch, without the aid of "Modern Tools"?

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And don't forget the High velocity, High Impact, Metal Parts Aligner- "Hammer Time" (any manufacturer)

Safety Glasses req'd

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On 2/28/2018 at 4:32 PM, campcop said:

I know this may not be popular but has anyone looked at the hand tools offered by Harbor Freight? They now sell polished wrenches that are in my opinion just as good as Craftsman and look like Snap-on and at a significantly lower cost

Back when I was turning wrenches for a living Snap-on, Mac or Cornwall were all that I would use. I needed them 8-12 hours a day everyday.  Now I'm just maintaining a couple of cars, a small motorhome, boat and a lawn mower.  I sold off my good tools 10 years ago. Harbor Freight and Craftsman has served me just fine since. I would say the weak point in most Chinese made wrenches is the ratcheting mechanisms and I still don't trust their torque wrenches. The tolerances have improved over the years but still not up to the quality of the better tool sets. I use CDI Torque wrenches. CDI is a subsidiary of Snap-on and makes a lower priced tool. The parts are sourced overseas and the tool is assembled in USA.

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5 hours ago, rcrowe said:

Back when I was turning wrenches for a living Snap-on, Mac or Cornwall were all that I would use. I needed them 8-12 hours a day everyday.  Now I'm just maintaining a couple of cars, a small motorhome, boat and a lawn mower.  I sold off my good tools 10 years ago. Harbor Freight and Craftsman has served me just fine since. I would say the weak point in most Chinese made wrenches is the ratcheting mechanisms and I still don't trust their torque wrenches. The tolerances have improved over the years but still not up to the quality of the better tool sets. I use CDI Torque wrenches. CDI is a subsidiary of Snap-on and makes a lower priced tool. The parts are sourced overseas and the tool is assembled in USA.

Welcome to the forum. I think it would be fun to get acess to one of the certified torque meters used to calibrate torque wrenches and run a test.

Bill

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21 hours ago, hermanmullins said:

Discount Tire has a torque wrench  tester and are happy to let you test your wrench.

Herman

I need mine checked but didn't find out ho would do it. Do I'll be going to Discount Tire. Thanks  :)

 

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