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kimenker

Motorhome Tires Size Change

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I'm looking at all my options for new tires on my 2009 Winnebago Journey 37H I've purchased this last year with 2013 255/80-22.5 Michelin XRV tires on it now. I drove these tire not know to check age when purchased from NC to Vegas this last January. I'm looking at the (3) types of tires sold thru FMCA , Michelin, Hankook and Continental. However both Hankook and Continental only come close to the size I have now in 275/80-22.5. My question is will that size work on my coach?

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The OP mentioned 2013 tires.

17 hours ago, kimenker said:

I'm looking at all my options for new tires on my 2009 Winnebago Journey 37H I've purchased this last year with 2013 255/80-22.5 Michelin XRV tires on it now.

 

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This gets to be like an adult diaper commercial, "It depends". I went to the 275/80-22.5 size from the 255/80's. I don't have a problem but I don't know how much clearance  is on your coach. There isn't that big of difference in the size. You can use this comparison tool to help you see. https://tiresize.com/comparison/

Bill

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On 9/9/2019 at 1:55 PM, kimenker said:

I'm looking at all my options for new tires on my 2009 Winnebago Journey 37H I've purchased this last year with 2013 255/80-22.5 Michelin XRV tires on it now. I drove these tire not know to check age when purchased from NC to Vegas this last January. I'm looking at the (3) types of tires sold thru FMCA , Michelin, Hankook and Continental. However both Hankook and Continental only come close to the size I have now in 275/80-22.5. My question is will that size work on my coach?

One thing we need to know is the actual load on your tires. Load capacity is IMO more important than just tire age. Before you decide what tires to buy you need to load the RV to the heaviest you ever expect to be (Fuel, water, food clothes tools books i.e. everything. Then get "4 corner" weights.  HERE is a worksheet that can help you with the math.

After you learn the weight on the heavy end of each axle feel free to contact me directly or post the numbers here. We can then work through the options. You might also check out my RV Tire Safety blog for general info on the "care and feeding" of your tires.

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14 hours ago, tireman9 said:

One thing we need to know is the actual load on your tires. Load capacity is IMO more important than just tire age. Before you decide what tires to buy you need to load the RV to the heaviest you ever expect to be (Fuel, water, food clothes tools books i.e. everything. Then get "4 corner" weights.  HERE is a worksheet that can help you with the math.

Well that is nice if you want to adjust your tire pressure but does nothing to tell you what tire you should buy.  The minimum tire size and load range for that RV is specified by the manufacturer. See the OEM size spec on the placard in the RV. You need to buy tires that meet or exceed those called for by the manufacturer. 

Bill

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On 9/13/2019 at 7:34 PM, WILDEBILL308 said:

Gee it looks just like what I posted 5 replies ago.

Bill

You mean we are supposed to read all the previous posts??😏

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That is pretty close. The other consideration is to get the proper load range. What coach do you have? 

See it would be easier if that info was in your signature.:D

Bill

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15 hours ago, OldBeaver said:

265/75R 22.5 is the nearest size to 255/80R 22.5.

 

I am actually doing research on tires myself as I have 265/75 R 22.5 on my motorhome. 

Don't forget to check the width. The new tire would be wider by about 0.4 inches. Not a lot, but sometimes it only takes a little bit to cause a problem. On your rear duals this will bring the tires 0.4" closer, which may or may not be acceptable. You must check the requirements for dual spacing and see if the new tires will have the required spacing when mounted on your wheels.

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17 hours ago, richard5933 said:

Don't forget to check the width. The new tire would be wider by about 0.4 inches. Not a lot, but sometimes it only takes a little bit to cause a problem. On your rear duals this will bring the tires 0.4" closer, which may or may not be acceptable. You must check the requirements for dual spacing and see if the new tires will have the required spacing when mounted on your wheels.

The tread width does not determine dual tire spacing, it's the section width of the tires when installed on the vehicle: https://www.pavementinteractive.org/reference-desk/design/design-parameters/additional-tire-information/Rim width has a great deal to do with tire sidewall bulge too.

Back years ago, before computers, the rule was a minimum of 1.5" between sidewalls, measured on the bottom when installed on the truck.

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The 1.5" rule also applied  to non radial tires, because over night the tire would settle and we would have a "flat spot"!  When leaving we would have the clunk sound until tires got warm...about 5 minutes.

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Dual spacing is specified for each tire from the manufacturer. It's usually listed in the spec for the tire. When installing tires which are different from OEM, it's necessary to verify that the new ones will have adequate spacing. Since the specific requirements for each tire are available, why would anyone go with a generic rule of thumb?

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This isn't rocket science. If you are concerned with dual spacing, go take a picture of the spacing. You could actually measure it. All the modern dual setups I have seen have plenty of spacing. A 0.4" change is so minor as to be not a issue. I doubt the average mechanic could repeat the same measurement with a +/- 0.4 accuracy.

Bill

 

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2 hours ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

This isn't rocket science. If you are concerned with dual spacing, go take a picture of the spacing. You could actually measure it. All the modern dual setups I have seen have plenty of spacing. A 0.4" change is so minor as to be not a issue. I doubt the average mechanic could repeat the same measurement with a +/- 0.4 accuracy.

Bill

 

Correct. It's not rocket science, which is why I'm so surprised my comment about checking the dual spacing is receiving such push back. It's simple to do, and it should be done whenever a change in tire size is made. Check the charts, compare to dual spacing of the wheels on the coach, and then carry on as needed.

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Don't take it personal...Ray & I only commented on the way it was, pre 1990.  Your coach did not come with radial/steel wrapped tires !

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