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Dual Pane Windows, Heat Pumps

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I will be ordering a new coach in the near future. Ive talked to two Winnebago dealers and gotten totally different opinions on the two items.

One says the dual windows are future problems and that adding the heat pump option is a waste of money also. The other says I should get both.

Any comments appreciated.

Henry #152452

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Henry,

There is some validity to both their answers.

Dual pane windows ARE prone to fogging, and at a higher rate than in home installations because of the likelihood that bouncing down the road adds to the chance of breaking a seal. If you camp in very cold or hot areas, the added expense and maintenance may well be worth it.

Heat pumps are more efficient at providing heat in the 40 degrees F and up temperatures, particularly if you are not paying for power where you camp. So, if you often camp in 40+ degree F conditions and have electricity there, it may be a worthwhile option. If temperature is below about 40 degrees F, heat pumps loose efficiency and cease to function properly. And, of course, if you primarily camp in the summer, it is a moot point. The heat pump function does add a small degree more complexity to the A/C, as the valve that "reverses" the coolant can stick.

Brett

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That's kinda what I figured also Brett. I live in Michigan, so you know the winters we get, but the my ride is inside when not in use, and I won't use it in the winter. How difficult is it to change a window? Probably a pain in the ***.

Thanks for the reply

H

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Another point about dual pane windows. They will help a little with heat loss in the winter, but will do nothing to inhibit heat transmittance from the sun in the summer. What makes the most difference in the summer are tinted windows, insulated drapes and window awnings.

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hanco

I have a 1995 Bounder with 19 dual pane windows and to date I have removed 9 of them As Soon As Moisture Appeared. I remove, dissemble, clean, then have the glass professionally resealed (currently $40 per window). I reinstall the windows and silicone around the outside on all sides except two small areas of the bottom of the frame that has cutouts for moisture. When the motor home is parked, I snap on a professionally made outside sun screen for each window and during the day I can see out but no one can see in. Motor home is stored outside (Minnesota) with no cover. My personal preference is dual pane windows.

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Guest BillAdams

Another point about dual pane windows. They will help a little with heat loss in the winter, but will do nothing to inhibit heat transmittance from the sun in the summer. What makes the most difference in the summer are tinted windows, insulated drapes and window awnings.

I am not sure that this would be correct. The dual pane windows in my coach remain cool to the touch on the inside while the single pane units (except the mirrored ones) are very hot. Homes with dual pane windows are also able to take advantage of this reduced heat transfer and would expect the same to be true in an RV.

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I think that if you do any camping in the fall time or spring that the heat pumps and dual pane windows would be a good option. They would certainly help with heat loss as well as helping your air conditioning in hot weather. I also think that if its noisy outside that the dual pane windows would help when your trying to sleep. Just my two cents Smokeater75. :)

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This is our third coach. Two with dual pane and one without. This one has heat pumps. If I can, I will not get another coach without dual and heat pumps. This coach also has two LP gas furnaces. When the temp exceeds 5 difference to the set point, the gas furnaces heat the coach up to the set point and then the heat pumps maintain that temp. As Brett stated below 40-45 degrees heat pumps are not very efficient.

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When you're at a rally, traveling from RV park to park and it's cold outside the central heat with the heat pump (powered by electricity you paid for at a park) is the cheapest way to keep warm. Mine works when the temperature is down to 25 degrees or so. When it's 25 degrees outside and you're burning propane at $4 a gallon and the insulation of the RV isn't great, the furnace(s) will burn a lot of propane. The only problem with the thermopane windows is the seal leaks sometimes and you'll have to get a pane resealed; considering all the windows in my RV, I have only two that fog up with moisture occasionally.

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My present coach is my first one with dual pane windows and a heat pump. Absolutely no problems. The heat pump has been very efficient in both heating and cooling modes. AC wise I prefer it over roof top units for the quiet operation. As previously stated, when the temp drops into the 40's thegas furnace picks up the function. Very pleased with both.

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Unless thermal windows for motor coaches have improved lately, I would stay away from them. I am taking my coach to a glass shop tomorrow. They are going to reinstall my driver's side window which was impossible to see out of under certain light conditions. The cost was not too bad (about $350 to replace just the fixed part) but I would just as soon not have to have it done.

I must confess that I spent hours scrubbing the windows and went on to this forum to find out why I couldn't get them clean. Brett straightened me out, but I did feel a little silly!

I thought about taking the window out myself, but the whole thing is about 4' wide by 3' tall, and I have reservations about balancing on a ladder and taking it out.

I live in Northern California where heat is much more of an issue than cold so I can't comment on their ability to keep out cold. I exp[ect that is compromised once they get cloudy anyway.

JT

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We've had both dual pane windows and heat pumps on our old coach as well as our new coach. Dual pane windows offer better insulating factors in summer as well as colder temps. And depending on the quality of coach, you should not have to worry about windows fogging. We updated to a new Anthem with the dual pane windows and our old coach(2002 Travel Supreme) had them also. We never had an issue with fogging. The heat pumps are also a great idea. You may not use your coach in the winter, but using your coach in the North in the summer. It still can be a bit chilly overnight. And the heat pump can give you heat without having to fire up the propane heater. We've used our coach into November and were able to use our heat pumps instead of the heater. I know it's an option on most coaches, or they'll give you 1 out of 2-3 AC's with heat pumps.

In my opinion I would not consider a new coach without either!

Dana & Shari and the Buster

2012 Entegra Anthem 44DLQ

2006 Envoy Denali Toad

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This is our second DSDP, both have had heat pumps and dual pane windows. Never had a problem with either other than in colder weather the heat pumps don't work so we have to use other sources (some as the sticki house).

Won't have an RV without both of them.

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Another point about dual pane windows. They will help a little with heat loss in the winter, but will do nothing to inhibit heat transmittance from the sun in the summer. What makes the most difference in the summer are tinted windows, insulated drapes and window awnings.

The insulation properties work both ways, keeps heat in and heat out. The only way it would be different is if they were coated to reflect sunlight, then they would keep heat out better than holding it in.

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I currently have a 2008 Winnebago Voyage which has both dual pane windows and a heat pump. So far, no fogging problems with the windows and the heat pump has worked flawlessly. As previously stated when the temp drops into the low 40's the heat pump is not effective and turns the heating duties over to the furnace. A/C wise, I think the heat pump is more efficient than roof air. A plus for me is the cleaner appearance of the coach as the heat pump is basement mounted. The heat pump is also much quieter than roof air.

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A/C wise, I think the heat pump is more efficient than roof air.

Note: Both basement AND roof A/C's can be reverse cycle/heat pumps.

Brett

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The insulation properties work both ways, keeps heat in and heat out. The only way it would be different is if they were coated to reflect sunlight, then they would keep heat out better than holding it in.

Deen, there is a problem with the reflective window tints on dual pane windows. It will heat up the air between the panes and build up pressure that can cause the seals to leak. Tints= good idea. Reflective tints= not so good an idea.

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I could be wrong about this but I was recently told by a dealer that because the air gap in dual pane windows on RVs is so small that the R factor between them and single pane is negligible.

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I have used my motor homes in temperatures 50 degrees below freezing and there is a lot of ice on the single glass windshield that I don't have on the dual pane windows. I have used dual pane windows for 49 years.

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I have a five year old coach with a HVAC type unit. It never has kept me cold or warm enough so I would never have another. The R value of a MH is poor at best which is part of the problem. Another issue is that I have floor vents and everyone knows that cold air doesn't rise. According to the manual, when the temps get below 45 degrees supplemental heating is needed. I have found that to be a true statement.

The roof top units are basically just horizontal window units. If my HVAC unit ever malfunctions, the repair bill is going to be huge because it isn't easy to get to. I assume that the weight difference is considerable.

I've had to replace two dual pane windows. It's a common problem with others. Wish I didn't have those either.

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The OP needs to read the thread, "Tinting Dual Paned Windows." There is some information here that is not correct, but is correct on the other thread...I'll not repeat it here. As stated, heat pumps are no good below about 40/45...we have two Lasko towers to supplement our Aqua Hot, not that the AH needs it, but I'd rather burn the CG's electricity than my diesel.

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