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Ford 2012 Escape, Fusion No Longer Towable

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rodneyr,

Welcome to the Forum.

Idling while being towed is not a good idea. There is very bad air circulation and the engine will defiantly over heat and that is another problem you do not want.

It seems to have come down to either a Dolly or pump.

Now would be the time for auto makers to come up with a lock out hub for front wheel drive vehicles. Hook up, twist the knob and away you go..

Herman

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As new FMAC members, we are reseaching the towability of our 2009 Escape FWD Hybrid. We currently have been using a tow dolly by Forrest River.....no problems.

However, the setup is time consuming and bad weather does not help matters. I spoke to a Ford Motor Company representative today, regarding flat towing our '09. The did provide some information....but not enough to my satisfaction. During a recent FMCA rally, we noticed Escape FWD Hybrids flat towed. I asked the owners....."did you have any problems while towing?" Their replies....."Not yet" or "None at all"

If any one has any new related news or information, related to "flat towing your Escape Hybrid".....please posted.

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I assume ll of these posts apply to automatic transmissions. I recently purchased a Fusion S with manual transmission to tow behind my Motorhome. Assume no problems with this.

Since the steering column doesn't lock on manual I assume this can be towed with ignition off.

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Strouble,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

Yes, as of one week ago (I got current information, as I moderated the Towing Roundtable at the FMCA Convention this week), Ford shows the manual transmission Fusion towable 4 wheels down.

You will have to look in your owners manual for the proper procedure.

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I purchased a new 2011 Escape in August of 2011and flat-towed it from Louisiana to Georgia & back, plus a few shorter trips. Then, in June, 2012, returning to Louisiana from a trip to the east coast of Florida, we were flagged down by another motorist on I-10 just east of Pensacola when they saw our Escape trailing smoke. We pulled immediately into a rest area whereupon further investigation revealed the transmission to be extremely hot. On top of that, the engine would not turn over although the battery seemed to still have some charge. Still would not start after jumper cables attached to RV. Long story but we ended up having it towed to the Ford Dealer in Pensacola where 2 weeks later it was returned to us with a new transmission, free of charge, with the explanation that a "pin" inside the transmission had done something it wasn't supposed to do, hence the transmission was destroyed. I'm not sure the service-writer knew what he was talking about - young guy - didn't really give a crap.

So now I am gun-shy. It is a royal pain in the butt to have this happen on the road away from home because first, you have to find someone to fix it, then, whether you want the **** thing or not, eventually you have to go back and get the car at your own expense. Ford won't pay for that.

I have been a Toyota owner for years and thought it was time to give an American company another chance. Big mistake. My advice to anyone looking for a toad - don't buy a Ford. The Escape is a noisy, rough-riding, gas-guzzling little beast that IS NOT FLAT TOWABLE!

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Hello all,

I leased a 2012 Ford Escape last November because It was made to be flat towed.

I made a few short trips with no problems but, last week I took it from NJ to South Carolina and in the way back home a state trooper pulled over to tell me that the car was smoking.

once I opened the hood I found that the transmission was extremely hot and the car wouldn't start at all, as a matter of facts the transmission got stuck in park.

I removed all three shafts and towed the car back home. I'm taking it to the dealer tomorrow morning.

Now, if this car can't be towed, then I don't need it. What can I do with the rest of the lease? Do I have any right to fight this with Ford Motor Company?

Please help!

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Greetings . . .

I am in the similar situation I purchased a Ford Escape in December and in April had it outfitted for flat towing. On Friday I was looking through my newly arrived FMCA magazine and found the notice about flat towing. Today I called my dealer and at first was told that I could tow it and I explained the notice in the FMCA magazine. He send an email via their internal email system which they enter a VIN number and a few minutes ago he called me and the response came back that this (no flat towing) only effects 2012 Ford Escapes built after February 17th and as mine was built in October 2011 it can be flat towed. While I know of no difference between the ones built before and after the February date I will be flat towing it and hopefully it is one of those that has no problems.

Mine was built in October also and the transmission just burned last week.

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Hello all,

I leased a 2012 Ford Escape last November because It was made to be flat towed.

I made a few short trips with no problems but, last week I took it from NJ to South Carolina and in the way back home a state trooper pulled over to tell me that the car was smoking.

once I opened the hood I found that the transmission was extremely hot and the car wouldn't start at all, as a matter of facts the transmission got stuck in park.

I removed all three shafts and towed the car back home. I'm taking it to the dealer tomorrow morning.

Now, if this car can't be towed, then I don't need it. What can I do with the rest of the lease? Do I have any right to fight this with Ford Motor Company?

Please help!

I got a call from the dealer telling me that the car is not covered because it was not to be towed for more than 20 miles.

what should I do?

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The 2012 Ford Fusion FWD is NOT towable. I just got a phone call from one of the sales persons, Kevin, stating that he has verified via the official FORD (internal) WEB site this fact is true. I also got a phone call from the New Car Sales Manager saying he would terminate our deal, because of this fact, or was it because we were concerned about it being towable.

I had purchased a 2012 Ford Fusion, but never taken delivery of it. Then I was sent to this thread by a good friend. Thank God for small favors. So I decided that I should update this thread as to what I was told. I feel bad for those that are stuck with a bad car.

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I have an 09 hybrid ESCAPE i have flat towed it ever where with no trouble at all. I towed it from Georgia to Vegas and back no trouble-- very good towing car.

Gary Holden

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I have a 2012 Ford Escape. Fried the transmission while towing it, and Ford replaced it. I have always followed the their limits of under 65 MPH and start and run through the gears for 5 minutes every 6 hours. So, now I am paranoid, and stop every 2 or 3 hours and start it. Just got home from a 7000+ mile cross country trip and so far its been good, but I'm just waiting for it to go out again, as I have heard lots of disaster stories re the Escape (especially that Ford no longer has faith in their product and will no longer cover towed transmissions under their warranty - this alone speaks volumes).

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I sure hope that more Hybrid owners will post their updates. I've been dealing with trying to decide what to do about my 2009 Ford Escape, have started a blog about it with lots of information about the transmission types, types of problems, misinformation and conflicting ideas from Ford, etc. http://www.maliasmiles.com/blog/2009-ford-escape-dinghy/

But I'm trying to make a decision about what to do before the extended warranty expires. I know I'll be on my own then! I'm starting more research on the Hybrid model now because of hearing that since it has a completely different, sealed transmission (eCVT) vs. the 6F35 transmission that keeps frying.

I had really hoped that would be the answer for me since that would save me having to buy a new baseplate, etc.

What I've seen here early on is encouraging. Any updates or news on the Hybrid being flat towed?

Thanks!

Malia

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We purchased a new 2012 Ford Fusion SEL in August 2011 as a tow vehicle for our motor home. When we were considering cars, we specifically asked the sales representative what Ford products could be flat-towed behind our motor home as we did not want to deal with a tow dolly. We were told a Fusion would meet our needs. Accordingly, we purchased a Fusion. Six months later, an "Owners Guide Supplement" dated February 2012 has come out saying that "Front-wheel drive (FWD) vehicles CANNOT be flat-towed (all wheels on the ground) as vehicle or transmission damage may
occur. The front wheels must be placed on a two-wheel tow dolly." We have experienced transmissions issues already, and wondering if anyone has gotten any satisfaction from Ford or a sure-to-resolve solution, other than a dolly?

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I too Purchased a 2010 Escape to flat tow. I was assured by the salesman at the time that it was towable. After about 6K miles the transmission burned up. Ford was very cooperative in replacing it with no restrictions on future towing. The service department manager just said that if it happens again they'll just replace it again. At that point I make the decision that I was not going to take a chance on getting stuck somewhere in the middle of nowhere with a bad towed. I now tow a Chevy Spark (standard transmission) and love it. I still have the Escape because I enjoy driving it, and love the utility of it. However, I will be hard pressed to buy another Ford product in the future. While everyone was nice, none was willing to tell you the truth. While they covered the damage, I'm probably several thousand dollars out of pocket in the transition.

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The problem is not with a particular model of Ford or Mercury. The problem is the 6F35 transmission. The problem is compounded if you are towing with a Diesel Pusher and / or are towing in hot weather. We lost two transmissions while flat towing in hot weather in AZ and had a third overheat in AZ while towing behind our Diesel Pusher again in AZ hot weather. We finally unhooked and my wife drove our 2010 Ford Fusion home the last 200 miles of our trip. These trip interruptions have been extremely inconvenient. Ford has been willing to replace the transmissions but not take the car back or buy us a tow dolly. We are disappointed in both Ford and FMCA for not helping to resolve these problems. We bought the Fusion specifically for flat towing after reading FMCA's flat towing car guide. In 2012 we finally broke down and bought a tow dolly. It's nice to not worry about the transmission frying but the dolly is inconvenient and dirty to deal with the belts around the tires. Besides that all the money spent for the base plate and tow bar was a waste.

In my opinion Ford has admitted that the 6F35 transmission is not acceptable for flat towing since they now say it is not warranted for flat towing in the later 2012 models.

We flat towed a 2000 Honda Accord for 7 years before we were rear ended and it was totaled and we never had a problem.

We have been toying with the idea of replacing the Ford and getting a new dinghy we can flat tow but I am leary of problems similar to those we have had with the Ford.

Any suggestions?

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JO1589,

Welcome to the FMCA forum!

There are few if any perfect solutions, regardless of what one buys. The fact that hindsight is generally 20 / 20, I have lamented some of my choices.

Ford did replace the transmission, that kind of leads me to believe they accepted responsibility for a system that did not perform as advertised.

It sounds like the car works well for you overall, how many miles you tow each year related to total millage driven is a factor.

Selecting a vehicle to tow, one needs to prioritize items. Sometimes style, features, ergonomics and maintenance need to be place lower on the list.

With all the current changes to Hybrid, Electric and Fuel cell that list is going to remain very fluid.

The statement of buyer be where is always going to be true. Things change regardless of what was built and will be built in the future.

It looks like many of the Electric / Hybrid systems will not lend themselves to flat towing. Currently that is not the market manufactures are looking to fill.

Rich.

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OregonBrewski --- Does your state (or the state where you bought the Ford) have a lemon law? If so, you should be able to make them buy it back. If not, does your owners manual state that the car can be flat towed (following the instructions in the owner's manual)? If that is the case then again, Ford should be liable at least until the warranty runs out. The fact that they sent you a supplement stating you cannot tow it 4-down does relieve them of liability. You bought the car for that purpose before they (Ford) notified you it isn't towable. They have to honor the terms that applied the day you bought the car. I would spend the money to at least talk to a lawyer and get his opinion. You might be able to find info on the lemon law in your state by looking at the secretary of state's website for your state.

Just realized from your name you may be from Oregon?? I googled "Oregon lemon laws on new vehicles" and got several hits saying they do have a lemon law and that buying back the car is a possible remedy. Check it out. Not sure, but I assume the laws of the state where you purchased the car would apply here if that is not the same as your state of residency. If you didn't purchase in the state you live in, I would definitely go the lawyer route.

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