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Trynforpar

Pre Drive Checklist

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I just purchased my first Motorhome and was wondering if anyone has developed a pre- drive checklist of things to make sure you do before leaving a campsite. A friend of mine just indicated to make sure you raise the jacks before you move which seems like common sense but I'm sure there are those that may forget. if anyone has prepared a list that they are willing to share I would very much appreciate it.

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Congratulations on the motorhome. One thing I like to do is take a walk around before pulling out to check every thing. Is the antenna down are all the compartments closed securely, have you left anything out in the campsite. Is the towed hooked up right.

Have you gone camping with your new motorhome yet?

Bill

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Take a tablet so you can write down those things you forgot or didn't know you needed.

Don't drive a long way the first time you don't want to be tired when you try setting up the first time. You want to drive far enough you start to get more experienced with the new coach and comfortable driving (it is a trade off).

Take your time there is no rush. I would plug in the power first so you can get the air going.

Bill

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I gave a tablet and pen to my DW about 15 years ago, told her to start making a list and checking it twice.

Now all I have to do is look straight ahead and ask if the list is complete, if no answer, I go looking for her to make sure the most important part of the list isn't left behind. "LOL"

Many happy tales, and trails with the new adventure.

Kay

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Hello Trynforpar, congrats on your new RV. I have been using an Android app called RV Checklist from Adventure Treks. This is a great tool that can be configured the way you like. It allows for additions to customize the list to suit your needs. I believe there is also a similar app for iPad/iPhone devices.

Safe travels and smooth roads.

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We have a 43-item checklist; and, to provide an additional layer of protection, one of us drives and the other marshals from off the nose. If a "killer" item like window awnings or power cord is missed, the marshaller picks up on the error before approving movement.

I copied/pasted for you. Feel free to do same, steal and modify as desired.

  1. Chassis Checklist - COMPLETE.
  2. TPMS - ON.
  3. AquaHot Block Heat - AS REQD.
  4. Seatbacks - UPRIGHT.
  5. ALL AWNINGS - RETRACT.

CAUTION: CHECK THAT TOPPERS ARE CLEAR

  1. Cabin Windows - LATCHED.
  2. PS Slideout Shade - RETRACTED.
  3. Shower Door Lock - SECURED.
  4. Undersink Drawer - LATCHED.
  5. Dinette Tabletop - LATCHED.
  6. Cabin Heat Pumps - AS REQD.
  7. Fantastic Fans - OFF, CLOSED.
  8. Aft Closet & Desk - SECURED.
  9. Hallway Closet Doors- LATCHED.
  10. Bdrm Slideout - SAFE RETRACT.
  11. Bedroom Doors - HALLWAY OPEN, BATHROOM CLOSED.
  12. Refrigerator Door Lock - SECURED.
  13. Exterior TV - RETRACTED.

CAUTION: ALL ITEMS ABOVE ARE DONE 1ST

  1. PS Slideout - SAFE RETRACT.
  2. DS Full Wall Slideout - CLEAR FLOOR & HALL AREA & RETRACT.
  3. SilverLeaf Console - AS REQUIRED THEN OFF. DOOR CLOSED.
  4. Audio Cabinet - AS REQUIRED AND DOOR CLOSED.
  5. Cockpit TV - SECURED.
  6. Dash Cam - POWER ON.

Initial walk-around

  1. Tires - CHECKED. No debris between duals, covers secure, no visible damage, hoses & sensors secure.
  2. Basement compartments - TRAYS LOCKED, DOORS LATCHED.
  3. Water seperator - DRAINED.
  4. Parking surface - CHECKED. Ensure surface is free of fluid leakage.
  5. Water hose - RETRACTED. Wipe clean during retraction.
  6. Shore power line - OFF, then RETRACTED. Wipe clean during retraction.
  7. Jacks - VERIFIED RETRACTED.
  8. Awnings - VERIFIED RETRACTED

Start sequence

  1. TPMS - Check Pressures: Steering 105, Drive 100, Tag 95, Dolly 50, Honda 27. Allowable tolerance +10/-5 psi.
  2. Seat/Wheel/Mirrors/Pedals - ADJUSTED.
  3. Ignition - FIRST DETENT.
    1. Verify BAY DOORS not annunciated.
    2. Wait for annunciator cycling to stop.
    3. Reset Trip Computer if desired.
    4. Engine - START.
    5. Immediate Oil Pressure - VERIFIED.
    6. Low Air Alarms - NOT AUDIBLE.
  4. Leveling Control Panel - TRAVEL.

Tag lift is inhibited for two minutes after ignition cycle is commenced by hitting Travel

  1. Suspension Mode - ACTIVE.
  2. Retarder - OFF.
  3. Coolant Temperature - 180F MINIMUM.
  4. Brake Controller - “C” INDICATED. Changes to numerical readout when service brake pedal pushed.
  5. Tag Lift Button - (WHEN LED NO LONGER BLINKS) PRESS
  6. Transmission Selector - “D” and ECON. When possible, perform drift check, halt with dolly brake toggle. WARNING Forward travel only. Rise to ride height times vary. Severe marshaller must check to see that underside will clear obstructions. NOTE: Raising tag axle lowers aft end, reduces clearance.

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Congrats to AndyShane. His list is better than the one we have developed. I couldn't stress enough the good judgement of using a list EVERY time you start the engine. Most of the repairs neccessary from not checking are dreadfully expensive. Have you ever been around a pilot? Any one I have ever seen always uses acheck list before taking off. Good choice!!

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We have a 43-item checklist; and, to provide an additional layer of protection, one of us drives and the other marshals from off the nose. If a "killer" item like window awnings or power cord is missed, the marshaller picks up on the error before approving movement.

I copied/pasted for you. Feel free to do same, steal and modify as desired.

  1. Chassis Checklist - COMPLETE.
  2. TPMS - ON.
  3. AquaHot Block Heat - AS REQD.
  4. Seatbacks - UPRIGHT.
  5. ALL AWNINGS - RETRACT.

CAUTION: CHECK THAT TOPPERS ARE CLEAR

  1. Cabin Windows - LATCHED.
  2. PS Slideout Shade - RETRACTED.
  3. Shower Door Lock - SECURED.
  4. Undersink Drawer - LATCHED.
  5. Dinette Tabletop - LATCHED.
  6. Cabin Heat Pumps - AS REQD.
  7. Fantastic Fans - OFF, CLOSED.
  8. Aft Closet & Desk - SECURED.
  9. Hallway Closet Doors- LATCHED.
  10. Bdrm Slideout - SAFE RETRACT.
  11. Bedroom Doors - HALLWAY OPEN, BATHROOM CLOSED.
  12. Refrigerator Door Lock - SECURED.
  13. Exterior TV - RETRACTED.

CAUTION: ALL ITEMS ABOVE ARE DONE 1ST

  1. PS Slideout - SAFE RETRACT.
  2. DS Full Wall Slideout - CLEAR FLOOR & HALL AREA & RETRACT.
  3. SilverLeaf Console - AS REQUIRED THEN OFF. DOOR CLOSED.
  4. Audio Cabinet - AS REQUIRED AND DOOR CLOSED.
  5. Cockpit TV - SECURED.
  6. Dash Cam - POWER ON.

Initial walk-around

  1. Tires - CHECKED. No debris between duals, covers secure, no visible damage, hoses & sensors secure.
  2. Basement compartments - TRAYS LOCKED, DOORS LATCHED.
  3. Water seperator - DRAINED.
  4. Parking surface - CHECKED. Ensure surface is free of fluid leakage.
  5. Water hose - RETRACTED. Wipe clean during retraction.
  6. Shore power line - OFF, then RETRACTED. Wipe clean during retraction.
  7. Jacks - VERIFIED RETRACTED.
  8. Awnings - VERIFIED RETRACTED

Start sequence

  1. TPMS - Check Pressures: Steering 105, Drive 100, Tag 95, Dolly 50, Honda 27. Allowable tolerance +10/-5 psi.
  2. Seat/Wheel/Mirrors/Pedals - ADJUSTED.
  3. Ignition - FIRST DETENT.
    1. Verify BAY DOORS not annunciated.
    2. Wait for annunciator cycling to stop.
    3. Reset Trip Computer if desired.
    4. Engine - START.
    5. Immediate Oil Pressure - VERIFIED.
    6. Low Air Alarms - NOT AUDIBLE.
  4. Leveling Control Panel - TRAVEL.

Tag lift is inhibited for two minutes after ignition cycle is commenced by hitting Travel

  1. Suspension Mode - ACTIVE.
  2. Retarder - OFF.
  3. Coolant Temperature - 180F MINIMUM.
  4. Brake Controller - “C” INDICATED. Changes to numerical readout when service brake pedal pushed.
  5. Tag Lift Button - (WHEN LED NO LONGER BLINKS) PRESS
  6. Transmission Selector - “D” and ECON. When possible, perform drift check, halt with dolly brake toggle. WARNING Forward travel only. Rise to ride height times vary. Severe marshaller must check to see that underside will clear obstructions. NOTE: Raising tag axle lowers aft end, reduces clearance.

Andy your pilot training is showing. You forgot some circuit breakers and the generator. :D:lol:

Bill

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That's a killer list Andy! We're a lot less formal but have some key reminders that we use. We got one of those antenna tags they sell at Camping world with a clip that I attach to the ignition key ring when we put the antenna up (which these days is almost never - makes it even more important). I use wheel chocks on the left rear wheel - by the utility connections. I store them in the electrical compartment. For our slides, the engine has to be off to operate but we are to be plugged in (or generator running) to supply electrical power to the electric motors. So we are plugged in until ready to go. Once slides are in, I disconnect the electric and store the chocks. Then check the water and sewer connections to ensure that I haven't left something laying on the ground or attached to the water outlet. I walk around, checking to see that all slides are in tight, check by physically pushing each storage compartment door to ensure they are shut tight.

Louise takes care of the inside and she has her regular routine that she follows starting in the rear of the motor home and working her way forward, clearing each space as she comes forward. Securing cabinet doors and refrigerator door, storing any loose items, etc. With the toad, she works the inside and do the outside connections. Everything has a routine order and when we complete we stop and look over the entire set of connections. Then we check lights, pull forward while Louise verifies the tow arms are locked in place. Before pulling out, the step cover is put in place and the door is electronically locked which also locks the outside compartments. Set the GPS and carefully check traffic and children and the indicator panel on the dash. Away we go!

One thing to watch out for is interruptions in your routine. If something throws you off your routine - even with a checklist - you will be prone to skipping something. It can be a visitor from another campsite, a phone call or text message or almost any other interruption. When that happens and it will, stop and go back to the last thing you were working on and mentally restart that activity to ensure you completed it before going on to the next.

When you catch an "oops" make note of it and find a reminder to help you remember to get that done from now on. Build your own checklist or your own routine. We're on the road almost constantly so the routine is practiced regularly. At the beginning of a long stay it is more important to go through things carefully and if you travel only occasionally, a checklist, followed item by item would be the only way for me.

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Congrats to AndyShane. His list is better than the one we have developed. I couldn't stress enough the good judgement of using a list EVERY time you start the engine. Most of the repairs neccessary from not checking are dreadfully expensive. Have you ever been around a pilot? Any one I have ever seen always uses acheck list before taking off. Good choice!!

Thanks!

I get paid to hang around with (other) pilots, we've devoted many years and some bent metal in the pursuit of a clean getaway, trip, arrival. More so than in aviation, y'all face daunting threats to people and equipment: each CG has a variety of obstacles carefully hidden and diabolically placed, and no two are alike.

There's not a single one of you who wouldn't be superb, taxiing a 777 around any major airport, after what you've been through with your MHs.

Now, there is a risk that comes along with a checklist, particularly a long one: rushing through it. I have to force myself to pause at each item and visualize the action, or even query the wife out loud.

Except for the simplest of pull-thru departures, we marshal every time. One my closest friends, a newly-retired dentist, just skipped that and caught a pole that was barely visible, low and on the passenger side of the site, as he swung wide to miss a parked car across the lane. He crushed a door on his Essex. That right side damage down low seems to be so common in the Class A's; two in our community club have dents running the entire wheelbase.

Thanks again for the kind words, enjoy our "prime time" of the year for using the rigs :)

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Andy one thing on your start list after you have oil pressure it is a good practice to bump it to fast idle (1,000 rpm) using the cruise control. This insures you get a complete burn and don't suffer from unburnt fuel washing down the cylinders and contaminating your oil. I got this info from Cummins. They also said you don't have to wait for it to warmed up all the way, that driving it would warm it up faster as in getting out of the campground.

Bill

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Andy one thing on your start list after you have oil pressure it is a good practice to bump it to fast idle (1,000 rpm) using the cruise control. This insures you get a complete burn and don't suffer from unburnt fuel washing down the cylinders and contaminating your oil. I got this info from Cummins. They also said you don't have to wait for it to warmed up all the way, that driving it would warm it up faster as in getting out of the campground.

Bill

Absolutely correct. And, this applies to any modern diesel engine, not just Cummins.

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Absolutely correct. And, this applies to any modern diesel engine, not just Cummins.

I'll have to look that up for mine. Thanks for the tip, Brett.

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I'll have to look that up for mine. Thanks for the tip, Brett.

Andy,

Yes, it applies to your C13 Caterpillar.

Basic warm up for ALL modern diesel engines (certainly all in last 15 years):

Yes, it takes a bit of common sense. Warm up time should certainly be different if you are parked in a Flying J at a freeway entrance VS in a CG where you will be operating at low speeds for 5-10 minutes before really getting into the throttle.

Start engine. After 30 or so seconds, raise to high idle (1000 RPM or so). Once air pressure is built/you have completed your walk around, you are ready to start driving-- at low speeds/low throttle positions. I don't like to really get into the throttle too much until coolant temperature is over 150 degrees F.

So, depending on ambient temperature and how far you are from where you really need to get into the throttle, warm up time can (and should) vary quite a bit.

Same for shut down. If you have driven on low speed streets, checked into a CG, etc when you get to your site, you can shut down immediately. If you just pulled a long up-grade and are in a "scenic overlook" at the top, let it idle for 3-4 minutes. Again, just common sense.

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Andy, A big Ditto on your list!

I do a quick walk around at all pit stops-just to make sure that items are all still in there proper location and tight and add in a good look at all the rubber and no fluid leeks noticed.

Keep the top side looking at the angles.

Rich.

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I do mine just like Tom, only difference is, that I have to do inside and outside! Therefore, I go thru the steps slower. If I get interrupted by another camper, I start over. I answer no phone calls, Attach toad, L/R, breaks work, tail lights...then I walk out and look at my departure to see if it's open.

I don't like GPS, got lost, too many times! I have a photographic memory, in color, so maps are fine!

I put my phone on silent mode.

Take your time and enjoy the beautiful country!

Carl

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I have waited until engine gets to about 75-80 degrees before going to high idle.

Is there a specific temperature one should wait for before going to high idle?

You should go to fast idle as soon as the oil pressure shows. there is no specific temperature.

Bill

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