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In front of the front axle is a U shaped bar that spans the frame.  The tails of the U are toward the front.  The tails are anchored to the frame with a long bolt (althread) starting with bushings, the U tail, , a 7" spacer, bushings at the frame.  The frame bushings are gone.  Has anyone encountered this, where can you get bushings.  I can easily recreate a new one if I can source the bushings.

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1 hour ago, Afordeck said:

In front of the front axle is a U shaped bar that spans the frame.  The tails of the U are toward the front.  The tails are anchored to the frame with a long bolt (althread) starting with bushings, the U tail, , a 7" spacer, bushings at the frame.  The frame bushings are gone.  Has anyone encountered this, where can you get bushings.  I can easily recreate a new one if I can source the bushings.

       What chassis do you have?   Frightliner makes a kit with both to bolts and the bushings. that connect between the frame and the ends of the  of the "U" shaped bar that connects to the front axle - on a solid front axle common on Coaches. The independent front axles would use a different style stabilizer system. 

I think that one could get a similar kit for most chassis builders, but always ask if the stabilizer bolt kit includes the bushings.

The stabilizer bar bushings - that connect it to the front axle are not supplied with the above mentioned kit.

IMHO - the bushings should be inspected every year and a new kit installed - replaced every 10 years. They can cause the coaches to loose stability, most noticeable in cross winds on PD coaches. 

Rich.

NOTE - Defective bolt bushing can cause the chassis leveling system to twist the coach enough to crack the windshield.  BTDT  

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18 hours ago, Afordeck said:

In front of the front axle is a U shaped bar that spans the frame.  The tails of the U are toward the front.  The tails are anchored to the frame with a long bolt (althread) starting with bushings, the U tail, , a 7" spacer, bushings at the frame.  The frame bushings are gone.  Has anyone encountered this, where can you get bushings.  I can easily recreate a new one if I can source the bushings.

Yes, I replaced with mine with Polyurethane bushings. See the post below.  

Bill

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4 hours ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

Ok do what you want but the Polyurethane bushings last longer and work better.

Bill

I agree.  And a side benefit is the polyurethane bushings are a little stiffer so they give better sway control.

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Not to be a trouble maker, but sometime just because a part will last longer doesn't mean it works better.

Polyurethane bushings are available to replace lots of rubber bushings. They do change the ride and handling characteristics though, so it's important to research the results on the particular chassis in question to be certain that any negative consequences don't outweigh the positive ones. Not saying that polyurethane bushings are bad, just that they are not recommended in all applications on all chassis types.

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2 hours ago, richard5933 said:

Not saying that polyurethane bushings are bad, just that they are not recommended in all applications on all chassis types.

"Not to be a trouble maker," Well yes you are. Give us specifics What RV chassis maker recommends against polyurethane bushings? Have you used them? 

I have used them in a couple of applications and the ride is ALWAYS better.

Bill

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I guess I could throw that back at you in reverse? What manufacturers specifically recommend replacing OE rubber bushings with polyurethane bushings?

I can only speak directly about my research on these regarding the front end of a bus chassis, but logic would say that the theory holds true for many (if not all) types of vehicles. Polyurethane bushing have different elasticity and hardness qualities than rubber. There will be differences in ride quality, handling, vibration transmission, and other factors. When engineers spec out these things on a chassis, they're not just randomly picking some rubber bushing off the shelf because it's the cheapest or because it fits. They choose the bushing based on a number of factors that contribute to ride quality, safety, handling, etc. I don't have an engineering degree, so I'm not keen on just randomly changing a component of my suspension system because it's supposed to last longer or provide better handling, at least not without doing my homework to be sure that it's a wise choice.

Here is just one of many sites out there that spell out the differences: https://www.suspension.com/blog/rubber-v-polyurethane-suspension-bushings/

Like I said in my previous post, I'm not saying that it's wrong to install the polyurethane bushings. I'm just saying that before someone jumps in and installs them it's wise to do a little research and see if the positives will outweigh the negatives. There will be both.

Kind of like a situation years ago when someone at the tire shop convinced my father that he should ante up and get the more expensive 'better' tire that carried a 60,000-mile wear warranty. He did and proudly drove the car home. Next day he drove it right back and had them put on the tires he originally asked for. What went wrong? The 'better' tires had a much harder rubber compound designed to make them wear longer. Problem was that the trade off of getting a longer wear life was a drastically harsher ride and increase in road noise.

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Sorry, but I'll go with Brett and Bill on this one.  I have never heard anybody complain about poly bushings, me included and I have them on mine!  

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Have not used them in a coach but as Richard suggests I and I can attest to in some cases and my reference is a little smaller than a coach, a Porsche, and similar, the ride will change to tighter and harder. Will the same occur in a coach of 30,000 pounds or greater you will have to try them and see for all our benefit. You might ask me if I would change should and when my big ones on the rear axle go, I would say definitely yes. The question then becomes what density. Like tires there are a significant variety to select from...

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