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kaypsmith

Impact tool

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I chose tires for discussion instead of general because I think it is better suited here. I have been pondering a new impact tool for changing coach tires in case of an emergency. I have all sizes from 1/4 to full 1 inch in pneumatic, but sometimes when on the road  air is not readily accessible except coach air, and that sometimes does not work like I would like for it to. A friend suggested a Kobalt brand 1/2 inch 24 volt from Lowes, I just snarled a little and said that would not work. He replied that his neighbor has one and uses it to change dump truck tires all the time. This morning I paid Lowes a visit and found one, but before buying it, I verified that I could return it if it was not adequate for my job. I took it home and proceeded to just remove a lug nut and to my surprise it worked. The battery was too weak to pull any others so I put it on charge for 2 hours and it was fully charged when I returned. I pulled the last nine nuts, removed the tire and replaced it plus all 10 nuts. I pulled out the torque wrench with cheater bar and determined that all nuts were properly torqued and found they need no more tightening. Just thought I would share in case others were interested.:rolleyes: 

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Kay you found a winner. Good reviews and you gave a good testimony. With your veterans discount the cost is down to $197.10 plus tax. Sounds like a buy to me.

Thanks,

Herman 

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Kay, great review and thank you for posting it. 

Any issues getting it into the drive axle lugs with the hub and axle so close? My concern, when you use an extension on an impact gun it lowers the Torque rating at the socket.

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59 minutes ago, jleamont said:

 

Any issues getting it into the drive axle lugs with the hub and axle so close?

Great question Joe, I changed the tag wheel today, and did not think to check clearance on the drive axel, so I just went out to the coach in the dark with flashlight in hand. Yes it is just small enough to fit all the way down to the lug nuts on my 12/22.5 with stainless wheel covers, and the stainless hub cover both in place without an extension. I will try to take a picture and post it tomorrow while there is daylight to snap a good picture. There is not a great deal of extra room but sufficient to achieve the intended goal on my size tire, probably not on 16, or 19.5 but the torque is not that great on those sizes, so an extension will be no problem on those.

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10 hours ago, kaypsmith said:

Great question Joe, I changed the tag wheel today, and did not think to check clearance on the drive axel, so I just went out to the coach in the dark with flashlight in hand. Yes it is just small enough to fit all the way down to the lug nuts on my 12/22.5 with stainless wheel covers, and the stainless hub cover both in place without an extension. I will try to take a picture and post it tomorrow while there is daylight to snap a good picture. There is not a great deal of extra room but sufficient to achieve the intended goal on my size tire, probably not on 16, or 19.5 but the torque is not that great on those sizes, so an extension will be no problem on those.

Kay, works for me! Thank you!!

I currently have the Snap on version which is in need of new batteries and it’s an older snap on model (from 2004) that doesn’t have that much power. I was going to replace the batteries but those alone cost more than the Kobalt :o 

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9 minutes ago, kaypsmith said:

Joe, this one came with a 4 ah battery, extra is $50.00, and there is a 6 ah for $80.00.

Good to know!! Already a better deal, technology has come a long way with battery powered tools!

Kay, don’t forget to recheck you wheel Torque after 100 miles. Recommended by most wheel manufacturers and a good best practice to follow. 

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Yep!  Car, Golf Carts, MC's, Trucks, RV's, Tractors, Trailers and OTR's!  I almost lost my rear wheel on the Jeep, 2 years ago. got wobbly and I stopped.  Could finger tighten 3 lugs!  :wacko:

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10 hours ago, manholt said:

Yep!  Car, Golf Carts, MC's, Trucks, RV's, Tractors, Trailers and OTR's!  I almost lost my rear wheel on the Jeep, 2 years ago. got wobbly and I stopped.  Could finger tighten 3 lugs!  :wacko:

Reminds me, I drove a DrPepper sales/delivery truck in the early 1970's, a country route, I was returning from my last stop with a nearly empty load of pop, and a nearly full load of empty bottles, an open bay truck. I was traveling about 55 mph at the time, I saw something whizzing by on the right side of the truck, about a half mile later I saw a tire on rim on the side of the road, I stopped to check it out, a quick glance at the right rear dual wheels, the outer wheel was missing, quess who the tire/rim belonged to.:ph34r:  Good thing empty bottles don't weigh too heavy.

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16 hours ago, jleamont said:

Kay, works for me! Thank you!!

I currently have the Snap on version which is in need of new batteries and it’s an older snap on model (from 2004) that doesn’t have that much power. I was going to replace the batteries but those alone cost more than the Kobalt :o 

Before buying a new Kobalt battery, check with Interstate Battery for cost of rebuilding yours. They warranty their work. I had them rebuild 2 12V Sears battery packs for me 2 yrs ago, and they still work like new. I think the cost was $37 ea. That $74 was approx. the cost of 1 new Sears pack.

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9 hours ago, kaypsmith said:

Reminds me, I drove a DrPepper sales/delivery truck in the early 1970's, a country route, I was returning from my last stop with a nearly empty load of pop, and a nearly full load of empty bottles, an open bay truck. I was traveling about 55 mph at the time, I saw something whizzing by on the right side of the truck, about a half mile later I saw a tire on rim on the side of the road, I stopped to check it out, a quick glance at the right rear dual wheels, the outer wheel was missing, quess who the tire/rim belonged to.:ph34r:  Good thing empty bottles don't weigh too heavy.

Kay, I cannot count how many investigations I have been involved in with "wheel off's", its common practice for most "tire experts" to mess up and improperly install, either not torqued properly or the hub flange is cruddy, either way they almost always result in a wheel off at some point. 

7 hours ago, RayIN said:

Before buying a new Kobalt battery, check with Interstate Battery for cost of rebuilding yours. They warranty their work. I had them rebuild 2 12V Sears battery packs for me 2 yrs ago, and they still work like new. I think the cost was $37 ea. That $74 was approx. the cost of 1 new Sears pack.

RayIN, I would consider that if the old design had enough power to do what this Kobalt can do. I have an newer Snap on 3/8 cordless that has more power than that old 18V 1/2" drive. 

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Impact tools are a great time saver if used properly.  Wonderful to get the lugs off. but when reinstalling, just use the impact tool to snug the lug nut up, especially on aluminum wheels.

After snugging, use a torque wrench set for about 1/3 of the recommended torque.  Tighten the lugs in the proper pattern then go to 2/3 the torque value and finally to the full recommended torque.  Then after 50 to 100 miles, stop and recheck torque to recommended value.  After another 100 miles, recheck the torque again.    Finally after 500 miles, do a final check.

Doing this will insure you have the lugs torqued evenly and properly.  I know this sounds like a nuisance, but it is the best way to set wheel lug torque.

The tire shops that run the lugs up hard and once are taking the chance of over stressing the bolts and taking the material beyond it's yield strength.  Once a bolt is taken beyond its yield strength, it is ruined and is now weaker.  It is set to fail now.

Ken

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4 minutes ago, TXiceman said:

Impact tools are a great time saver if used properly.  Wonderful to get the lugs off. but when reinstalling, just use the impact tool to snug the lug nut up, especially on aluminum wheels.

After snugging, use a torque wrench set for about 1/3 of the recommended torque.  Tighten the lugs in the proper pattern then go to 2/3 the torque value and finally to the full recommended torque.  Then after 50 to 100 miles, stop and recheck torque to recommended value.  After another 100 miles, recheck the torque again.    Finally after 500 miles, do a final check.

Doing this will insure you have the lugs torqued evenly and properly.  I know this sounds like a nuisance, but it is the best way to set wheel lug torque.

The tire shops that run the lugs up hard and once are taking the chance of over stressing the bolts and taking the material beyond it's yield strength.  Once a bolt is taken beyond its yield strength, it is ruined and is now weaker.  It is set to fail now.

Ken

Excellent advice, Ken.

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I had to sell torque operations to the inspectors at work and the standard practice was if the nut didn't move when applying the torque it had to be loosened and re torqued. In some instances the hardware had to be replaced and re torqued.

Bill

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3 hours ago, wolfe10 said:

And, one has to be mindful of lubricated vs dry specs.  BIG difference.

You lubricate the stud threads, the torque value is much lower.

 

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Just now, TXiceman said:

You lubricate the stud threads, the torque value is much lower.

 

Correct.  And in many cases torque values are ONLY for one or the other (lubricated or dry).

Do NOT confuse two, as lubing and torquing to dry specs will WAY over-torque the fastener.

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I enjoyed your Post and decided to go to Youtube to see what other people's experiences were. I've spent 50 years in the Automotive/Commercial Truck Repair Industry and have a used both 1/2 Air and Electric (110V) Impacts. It was my experience that an Air Impact is much better! We just added a Spare Wheel to our Motorhome and I plan to use only hand tools, i.e. Breaker Bar to remove the Lug Nuts and a Torque Wrench to reinstall.

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I really like that Kobalt torque wrench (can a man have too may tools?), sadly when I mentioned it to DW she reminded me I'm 76 and got no business trying to change a large tire.

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