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gregrock68

Motorhome To Pull 15k-18k Stacker Trailer

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HI all

New member here and looking for some advice.

Soon I will be purchasing a used motorhome and I need some advice on one that will pull a my race car trailer which is a 2 car stacker type of trailer that is 26 ft long. Some guys I know use a TAG axle, others do not. Most everyone uses at minimum of 400hp and typically a Cummins over the other available brands per my friends who haul this type of set up.

I guess my question is since I am looking at particular brands, including Newmar, Beaver, Tiffin and a few others does any one brand stand out better than others for pulling or is it just personal preference and features of the chosen motor home?

Also, what features do you recommend or not recommend??

Thanks

Greg

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You are not going to be happy with most answers because very few motorhomes are rated to pull that kind of weight. Most of your run of the mill diesel pushers have a 10k hitch. You will need to move into the high end like Marathon, Blue Bird, Prevost or something similar to get to these weights. You will see a lot of people towing way over their max and get away with it but they are on borrowed time. Good luck with your search.

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Yes, most are 10k but there are a few in the 15k range in a TAG axle, (Fleetwood Revolution TAG for example), just wasn't sure if there are other motorhomes out there that I am not aware of. I agree that most are on borrowed time when not out fitted correctly for the pulling capacity, hence my question.

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Greg,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

Tell us what price range you are in-- that will help us to help you narrow down the field.

Said another way, if you are in the under $50k, no point in our listing new coaches.

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There are some bargain used class 8 tractors out there with custom sleepers and the amenities of a small motorhome. Everything you need to sleep, shower, cook, and be comfortable. They can pull large loads, but you would have to be able to shift multi geared transmissions. 10 speed and up. Might find one with an automated tranny. Good luck finding a used Renegade. Might be my next motorhome if we had the $$$.

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Lets go back to what Wolfe10 said "Tell us what price range you are in" If you have deep enough pockets just drive your motor home and have one of your people drive the toater with the stacker. I don't know of that many coaches that have over 10,000 lbs. rated towing capacity. Just because some one wants to do something doesn't always make it safe or practical. Said another way just because some one has done it and got away with it doesn't make it a safe practice.

On the other hand I know a guy who will build you what ever you fancy.

Bill

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Greg,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

Tell us what price range you are in-- that will help us to help you narrow down the field.

Said another way, if you are in the under $50k, no point in our listing new coaches.

I am thinking up to 120k, that way I get into reasonably new unit minimum

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Regardless of the HP, most MH will not handle more than 10K because of the tongue weight and the stress that puts on the chassis and coach. There devices such as the Hitch Helper and other brands of tow dollys that take the weight off the hitch and place it on a extra set of wheels. However in looking at it, I still had reservation about the braking, Most trailers are electric brakes, don't think that would cut it! I don't know much about them, but there is such a thing as air over hydraulic brakes for large trailers which might work better for you.

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There are plenty of 5th wheel, custom trailer haulers out there, that will do the job....no class A motor homes in your price range that I know

about, new or used!

Any thing less than 40' and you will have the tail wagging the dog!!!

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Greg.

There is a caveat. If you do find a DP in your price range, there is a matter of care and feeding. DP's are not cheap to insure, operate, service or fix! 8 tires alone, is in the $7,000 to $9,000 dollar range, depending on size, every 6 to 7 years.

You can save some $$$ if your able to service your engine.

I think you should ask your race friends, the same questions your putting on us...

Happy New Year :)

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There is another factor that needs to be considered, that is the maximum length, "http://www.onlinetowingguide.com/pdfs/StateTowingLaws.pdf". I do see some people exceeding the maximum length, but I consider it a very risky thing to do.

You might be lucky and avoid ever questioned by a trooper, but there is always the possibility that something might go wrong, a wreck could be devastating in the event insurance fails to pay because of not staying within the guidelines of the law.

I do see many tractors that have been converted as mentioned in an earlier post that is designed to do the job that you are wanting to do. I love my class A, and want others to enjoy also, but be careful in your planning.

Kay

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Kay/ I have seen the class 8 tractors I mentioned pulling large racing trailers. If the OP found one with a regular fifth wheel they can be modified by a public garage specializing in large trucks for not a lot of money.

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Most higher end models of all brands will have a 15k tow rating...Amer Coach, Monaco, Newmar, Winnebago, etc. Normally, to go higher than that, you'll need Prevost, Newell, etc.

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Most higher end models of all brands will have a 15k tow rating...Amer Coach, Monaco, Newmar, Winnebago, etc. Normally, to go higher than that, you'll need Prevost, Newell, etc.

Most of my friends racing are using Newmar, Beaver, Prevost or Monaco to pull there stacker trailers. These units have 15k hitch ratings and the only modification they have done are to gusset the hitch more than it already is in stock form. This seems to be a safe, good and reasonable idea.

Thank you everyone for your advice.

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There is another factor that needs to be considered, that is the maximum length, "http://www.onlinetowingguide.com/pdfs/StateTowingLaws.pdf". I do see some people exceeding the maximum length, but I consider it

a very risky thing to do. You might be lucky and avoid ever questioned by a trooper, but there is always the possibility that something might go wrong, a wreck could be devastating in the event insurance fails to pay

because of not staying within the guidelines of the law. I do see many tractors that have been converted as mentioned in an earlier post that is designed to do the job that you are wanting to do. I love my class A, and want others

to enjoy also, but be careful in your planning.

Kay

Thanks K, but is this possibly dated? The speed limit listed for Virginia (where I live) is listed as 55mph, and that dates back approx 10 years ago since it was changed. The length allowed is also higher than listed on the sheet which is currently 65'

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Greg,

That is great news that it has increased in Virginia. If you travel to other states, the length factor for each state applies, reciprocity does not apply. My coach is an MCI, and does have the class V hitch, which I installed. It will definitely pull the weight, but with a 26 foot trailer behind it will be at least 68 feet. MCI does have an F3500, only 35 feet with single axle and same drive train as the larger coaches, it has been converted by many to a beautiful coach. Happy holidays.

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The hitch rating is only part of the towing equation. The coach and chassis makers will also have a tow rating (some times not the same). Finally, the proper way to compute the tow rating is to take the coach's GCWR and subtract the coach's ready to travel actual weight from it. If you are operating the coach GVWR, take that number and subtract it from the GCWR.


The lowest of these four figures is the actual tow capacity.

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If I was younger, I could be a bus nut. Road a lot of them as a kid in the fifties. I have mentioned before that I have a friend that worked on both MCI and Prevost coaches. He liked the MCI units the best and said that in his opinion they were best.

As far as length when towing goes. When so called Deregulation occurred in the trucking industry in the early 80s the Federally mandated max length for a single trailer eventually became 53 feet on the Interstate with no limit on the size of the tractor. I was normally 71 to 72 feet in combined length with extended hood tractors and some of the custom tractors with a really long wheel base were far longer. If you check the Motor Carriers Road Atlas you will see many non interstate routes in the lower 48 marked in orange that indicate that those rigs are allowed. I don't know how these facts pertain to non commercial towing, but it probably is affected by the Federal and complying state regs. A good internet search might be in order to figure out exactly what a motorhome or bus can tow. Possibly more than we guess??

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ObedB,

Yes I do like the bus, had one uncle, and two cousins that drove for Greyhound while I was growing up, also an uncle that drove a city bus in Lagrange Ga., had plenty of riding experience back then. At the age of twelve I landed my first job as a greaser/spotter at a chicken hauling company, several IH tractors with 10 speed road ranger's, and two Autocar's with 13 speeds, that's where I learned of course how to back a trailer, very good experience as far as I am concerned.

And I picked MCI over Prevost because of the monocoque design, there is no flexing of the body as with a floor over frame rigs, therefore the granite floor and granite counter tops will not crack from normal movement down the highway, and of course that is only my opinion.

I might mention that my bus was in Whitehaven Pa., when I bought it, I think that is NE of Stewartstown.

Anyway Happy holidays,

Kay

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