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jcbett

Recommended Cord Length And Size?

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We were motorhomeing in the 80s with a 30amp requirement and we carried about a 100' of 30amp electrical cord. I would use an adapter at the source if needed. This coach has 50amp and about 30' of cord. Typical power source was one power source per cluster of 4-6 camp sites.

First question: What is the typical distance to power source in campgrounds?

Second: Carry 50amp extension cords (hard to coil and store) or step down to 30amp and complete the extra run? Understand that would not be able to run two air conditioners.

Looking to know what recommendations for extra electrical and water lines to carry on board.

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Jim, this is a good question. I haven't had to use an extension for 50amp service. So far I have ben able to position the coach so I could plug in. I do have a 50' 30 amp cord because I have ben to a couple of events where they only offered 30A and said it would be a fairly long run to the power supply. I do look at the 50A extension cords and think I ought to get one, but I haven't needed one.

Now with water and sewer there is a no telling how much you will need. I have 4 sections of sewer hose and have needed all of it once or twice. I have water hose in 3,' 15', 25, and 50' and have actually used all of it in a state park to fill water with out moving.

Bill

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I never had to use a extension but had to use adapter for 30 amps. I think you will be lugging and storing a very heavy cord for no reason. I would rather dry camp than stretch a power core that long as can be either be a fire hazard or be damaging to the coach with not providing enough amps to one leg or another.

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I carry a 50' 30 amp extension cord and only use it in emergencies when I need to charge my coach batteries. In five years have only use it when parking at

family member homes.

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The welding cable will cost a lot more. I still haven't needed more 50 amp cable anywhere.

A couple of add on things. I do carry a fairly heavy duty 10 gage extension cord and all the adapters to connect to anything. I can go from 15A up to 50A and back down. :D

While we are talking power cords and what you need for your new RV. A surge guard is probably the most important item you need.

Here is the one I have and it saved me once again this last summer from plunging in to a bad power supply.

http://trci.net/products/surge-guard-rv/hardwires-portables/50a-portable-w-lcd-display

Yes I know you can use a meter but that meter will only tell you what the power is when you are holding it. The Surge guard will monitor and shut off power in low and high power events.

Bill

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Don't know there is a "one answer fits all".

For the last two decades, we have the OE 50 amp shore power cord and TWO 30 amp RV cords. Have never been where the original 50 and two 30's would not reach. And, have never been in a place where they had 50 amp service that was remotely located-- just 30 or 15/20. We will continue with what we have.

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I have 6 feet of 50 amp cord that pulls back inside the coach and remains there, I carry a fifteen foot 50 amp extension that can and usually is added at the campgrounds many times, then I also carry a 30 foot 50 amp that can be used in place of the 15 footer.

Only once have I been in a situation that I actually had to use both 15 and 30 feet to make a total of 51 feet if needed. I coil the 30 foot into a 5 gallon plastic bucket and the 15 foot on top of the 30 foot in the same bucket which I have room for in my electrical bay.

The bucket serves very well, especially for coiling purposes.

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Hmmm, my 50 amp cord must be short. I carry a 15' 50 Amp extension cord. I have never measured what is on the reel but it is resides 4' in front of the rear tire but it will only go maybe 8-12' beyond the rear of the coach. Most of the time its fine but at least once a year I have to pull the extension out. I also carry an 20' Sewer hose extension and two water hoses, one is 15' and one is 25'. We have been a few places where all of the connections were on the passenger side (back in site) at least 10' over in the corner where 4 sites all met. A campground in Delaware comes to mind as I am typing this.

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We carry one 50 amp extension cord. Only used it once, but when you need it, you need it. We were in a CG on the MS River that was set up for Class A's...we had a 5th wheel at the time. The only way we could park facing the river was 'backwards,' which put all the connections on the 'wrong' side.

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I have 6 feet of 50 amp cord that pulls back inside the coach and remains there, I carry a fifteen foot 50 amp extension that can and usually is added at the campgrounds many times, then I also carry a 30 foot 50 amp that can be used in place of the 15 footer.

Only once have I been in a situation that I actually had to use both 15 and 30 feet to make a total of 51 feet if needed. I coil the 30 foot into a 5 gallon plastic bucket and the 15 foot on top of the 30 foot in the same bucket which I have room for in my electrical bay.

The bucket serves very well, especially for coiling purposes.

The bucket is a great idea and I use for tire chains, w/s solvent with lids on both. You never know what you get at truck stops.

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I agree the bucket is great idea and the one we haven't thought of hummm. I agree on the surge protector but on our coach I hard wired it, too easy to steal if plug in model. Shop Amazon, I got the current 50 amp last month for $274 and free freight and no tax!

Bill

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I have 50A on power reel, 30'. Carry a 50', 30A. Same connectors as Brett. 4, 10' sever hose. Water reel has 50' and carry an extra 10' and 25', also a 30' for filling fresh water tank. Inline filter. The 10' is designated back flush! First owner re plumbed so I can't use my city water hook up to fill tank! :wacko:

I have several 5 gal. buckets at house...now I know what to use 2 for, elect and water...thanks for a great idea Kay! :wub:

I'm now leaving for South Plains Cummins (CCC) to spend $$$$! :)<_<:D

Carl

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I agree the bucket is great idea and the one we haven't thought of hummm. I agree on the surge protector but on our coach I hard wired it, too easy to steal if plug in model. Shop Amazon, I got the current 50 amp last month for $274 and free freight and no tax!

Bill

The hard wired surge protector also protects you from bad cords and extensions cords as per this discussion.

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Your right Ray! I forgot to mention that mine is hard wired. Also, have a pedestal mount that I keep at the fish/duck camp in LA.

Carl

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I tried a bucket with a 5th wheel. If really cold, you can't get a 50 amp cord coiled into a bucket...maybe a 55 gal bucket. :)

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FIVE.

I don't do "really cold"! :P Just as I avoid 100+ in summer, unless I'm rolling thru on my way to the mountains. Like 108 in Roswell and 80 in Ruidoso, NM. Besides that, I do have heated bays, don't you? :rolleyes::D

Carl

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We too carry extra extensions. You will get voltage loss over distance with a given wire size. You can use this handy calculation to help make sure you don't overload your line. I used the same when installing remote service to our RV parking spot at our last house.

http://www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-calculator.html

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I've had to use a 50amp extension one time at campgrounds. I had bought one because of the previous setup at my home (since changed) required use.

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Sure, the bays are heated, but the cord laying out in the freezing weather is not. I'm not sure even the power cord roller in this Eagle could handle it, but it's nearly impossible to coil by hand when that cold.

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You'll get no negative from me! That's why my coach don't come out and play in the snow/ice! :P If I want snow I'll fly and stay in a warm cozy lodge :D

Carl

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The only time you'll find us out in the cold is when heading south...out of the cold!

Agreed! I won't drive ours until the rain has washed away all salt.

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