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Against The Law To Idle, Gas Or Diesel

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Recently i discovered that New Jersey vigorously enforces a law that makes it illegal to idle gas or diesel for more than three minutes. The New Jersey State Police particularly enforce idle regulations on the New Jersey Turnpike. A fellow MH owner on a recent trip thru NJ stopped at a rest stop, while waiting for engine to cool, he fell asleep in the drivers seat. Apparently a trooper was timing the idle time from a nearby vantage point 

After ten minutes the trooper approached the MH, woke the driver and presented him with a $250.00 summons. The driver vigorously protested that he did not purposely idle the MH for more than shutdown cool, at which point the trooper checked the box on the ticket requiring him to also appear in person in a NJ courtroom at a later date. When the MH owner who is home plated in Georgia, called the court and explained that he lived out of state and it would be a financial hardship to return to NJ, the court allowed him to "Plead Guilty" and pay his $250.00 fine by mail.

The point here is that approximately  31 states out of  50 have Idle Laws of some kind or other.  Check out the states you run in!

idling_fact_sheet_1.pdf

 

2016 State-to-State Idling Guide_ Land Line Magazine.pdf

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I would have argued that it was  necessary under the exception. "Operation of auxiliary or alternate power systems for cabin comfort."  They may say it only applied to running the generator.

Thanks for the links. I know they watch the trucks around here and all the big truck stops have installed systems to cool or heat the cab.

Bill

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That is total BS... five minutes is NOT long enough for a heat soaked turbo to sufficiently cool and prevent bearings from coking oil.  Caterpillar turbo cartridge = $3500.00 plus labor.  

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Actually, that's likely not correct.  If you were driving 65 MPH and you suddenly had to stop for traffic 5 minutes might not be enough time.  However, for most of us we slow down for the exit, drive at a substantially slower speed to where we plan to stop or fuel or whatever and during that time the engine has had more than ample time to cool down.  By the time to get where you actually plan to shut down the engine everything is plenty cool enough to shut down.

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I base my cool down time on actual EGT not time to stopping point. Yes most time by the time you get to a camp spot it should be cooled down enough. It does take longer when the outside temps are higher.

Bill

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The slant for these idling violations is primarily for desel vehicles, and idling for comfort or cool down.

Another type of idling violation that probably won't apply to most RVs, but still exists is "puffing".  This is where the owner leaves their vehicle idling and unattended (while they go inside their home) to warm the vehicle up in the winter months.  It's a violation in Colorado, and probably a few other states as well.  $100.00 fine.

http://www.nbc11news.com/content/news/Warming-up-your-car-unattended-is-illegal-in-Colorado-364803991.html

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Several years ago, I was flying a corporate jet and we had a trip to northern Canada.  We got picked up (after securing are aircraft in a heated hanger) by our customers and during the drive to the motel made a comment about how much those folks must appreciate their vehicle's garages.  Much to out surprise the driver said most people don't have garages, they start their diesel trucks in the fall and shut them off in the spring.

My DD's manual says emphatically, not to idle it for a long time.  Should idling be necessary for cabin heat or cooling, the high idle setting should be used.

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Read volume one (the section on thermodynamics) "The internal combustion Engine in Theory and Practice" by Charles F Taylor....  Ageed that EGT  is a good measuring tool for shutdown

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Never argue with a cop especially a NJ cop. Apologize if you can and might get a warning. Heat Soaked Turbo on the Jersey Turnpike ? Come to think of it the warning sign has always indicated 5 minutes when I was there many time since the Eco Police evolved.

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Don't know if there any other Huey drivers in the group, but in a Huey after setting it down upon hovering to parking (a hover is the power equivalent of cruising), the throttle is rolled down to idle for two minutes...then it is shut down.

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On 5/15/2017 at 6:32 PM, FIVE said:

Don't know if there any other Huey drivers in the group, but in a Huey after setting it down upon hovering to parking (a hover is the power equivalent of cruising), the throttle is rolled down to idle for two minutes...then it is shut down.

Different beast all together.... made of exotic metals like tungsten, molybdenum, niobium .......     modern diesel turbo (Ray Jay or Garrett) nothing like a Pratt or GE turbine.   The Pratt engines do have the same compression ratio as a Cat or Cummins tho~

Yea, and also those entities who purchase and operate Bell UH-1s have the ability to actually PRINT money.

Let your turbo cool...  it will last longer

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When I get fuel, I do not shut down engine or generator...never had a problem and have not seen many UTR;s shut down either!

Carl

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I installed the EGT gauge last year. To my surprise it cools rather fast even on high idle with the cruise on. I can pull a hill on the highway let off the accelerator pedal up the ramp and coast. at the end of the ramp I'm below 400 degrees when I was at 1100 prior. 

Carl, I didn't shut it down before, after Herman posted how he tilts his coach to actually fill the tank I do now and dump the bags on the right side. My gauge actually goes to Full now! Before I would turn the cruise on and bring the idle up to 1100. But my HWH system will not come out of travel mode with the engine running 

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What size tank do you have?  Herman is 135 gal and mine is 150....Generator shuts of at 1/4 tank, I took it here once and had no problem finding a Truck stop.  Took 109 gal...my fuel line is right at bottom of the tank! When traveling I fill at 500+/-, avg 78 gal.

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135 gallon (of useful space as Monaco calls it) on ours also. The tank is actually 150 gallon, but there is a large air pocket on top of the fuel. When you tilt the coach you have around 5 gallons of air space instead of 15. When I would fill up the gauge was below full. Herman posted how he will lean his coach to one side and fill it up, then his gauge reads full. Ours does the same, now I do that every time.

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Joe have you noticed the looks you get from the truckers when you do this. I have had them come up and ask what and why. Then their response is 'Oh'. The one thing I noticed is after I fill and check my Trip Tech will shows 124 Gallons in the tank. It will stay at 124 for about a 100 miles.

Herman  

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Herman, yea....you do get some funny looks :lol:. We just returned from a weekend trip, I put 150 miles on the coach, its still at full. The only problem I have is how long it takes the coach to get back to its normal position. I usually go and wash my hands while its adjusting back to normal so I can move it.

Its all good until I take the cap off at home to add an additive or syphon some fuel to replace a filter and get a lap full of diesel :wacko:. Someday I will have a shirt for that also :lol:

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Does it really make that big a difference to get that extra few gallons in. I thought you weren't suppose to top off anyway so the fuel had room for expansion 

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John, by design there is still room above. Our fill necks are not on the top of the tanks so when you fill it up the level only goes to the bottom of the fill neck, from the photo below that is still well below the top.

IMG_2636.JPG

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Gee I have fuel tank envy!!! I only have a 90 gallon tank and seldom wait till it is 1/4 before filling most times just under 1/2.  If I wait till 1/4 that still gives me over 550 miles before I need to look for fuel.

Bill  

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Joe I see your point I get to about 7/8 of a tank then the foam starts kicking it out I can play with it and get it filled 

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