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AndyShane

Another Goodyear Tire Failure Saga

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I specifically requested Goodyear tires on a car-hauler trailer custom-built for me last year. It arrived with Goodyear Wrangler II LT tires, late 2014 manufacture dates. I shrugged off the age of the tires, and accepted the unit.

My practice is to inflate to sidewall placard pressure, as we've discussed extensively at FMCA and iRV2. Additionally, I scan both tire and bearing temps during safety stops on a progressive schedule underway: first, third, sixth hour. 

With a year of use, and about 5,000 miles -- there was no visible tread wear -- my trailer tires began failing internally during a recent trip. Thankfully, the first two were caught during slow deflation by the TPMS; the third exploded and did some fender damage.

To help users, I'll include a photo of the second tire failure, caught in progress. That way, you can spot what to look for. This particular tire was checked an hour prior to the incident and was running at 116F on a warm summer day in Georgia, inflated to 80PSI at 70F. There was no bearing or brake drag to increase wear/temperature. The combined weight of the car, trailer and misc contents divided by four barely exceeded 50% of the tire's load rating.

 

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In the case of this tire, I initally thought it was a false alarm from the TPMS: I entered a nearby rest area and parked on the end with the alarmed tires curbside for safety, soap-tested the still-inflated tire. No leakage was noted, so I tightened the TPMS transmitter, reinflated the tire and noted the pressure, fixed myself lunch. A half-hour later, I noted the pressure. The tire had lost something like 40PSI, so I removed it from the trailer and found these fissures between the treads.

Research showed a pattern of failure in earlier Wrangler II LTs, some 200 injuries and 15 deaths have been associated with the model. However, Goodyear has paid claims and not recalled the tires.

Three of these tires failed internally in three successive days of driving; so, I was at the Goodyear store in Marion, Mississippi, when it opened the morning after my third loss. The helpful salesman confirmed that Goodyear had not recalled that series, and explained that he'd have to order replacements. 

Since a Toyo dealer was nearly next door to our RV park, I went to them, next. Imagine my delight, discovering that the owner is a fellow Class A owner! He had indeed gotten the proverbial memo about Goodyear's quality/safety problems, and steered me to Toyo. We rummaged through his inventory, and he had me grab various sidewalls to assess their strength, an important characteristic of trailer tires. I noted that the light truck tires actually seemed to have beefier sidewalls than those designated for trailer use. 

His crew immediately swapped out all four of my tires. Counting the generic Chinese spare I'd bought in the wake of the first tire failure, I'd spent about $1,000.

I reported the failures to the trailer manufacturer, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and to Goodyear. 

Goodyear contacted me quickly, their representative stated that I'd been assigned a claim number. I submitted a debrief and receipts to them upon request and was just notified yesterday that they intend to give me a $267 rebate on a future Goodyear purchase.

Given my experience with their product, I'm not sure if that option will be exercised, frankly.

Consumers beware.

 

 

 

 

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Andy, thanks for your your report. Sorry for your issues. 

I have 6 G670s on the rear of my coach and plan on replacing them with Toyos the first of next year. I replaced the Steer tires to Toyos after an experience with GY.

Herman

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IMO I would consider that tread design too aggressive for a trailer application. If you read my blog on Interply Shear. you may understand that all the high side loading has to go through the tread to get to the belts. The side loading seen in the video is just tearing the big lugs off the carcass. A ribbed pattern would be better for trailer application.

 

I hear good things about the

Sailun S637

  in STt235/85R16 LR-G  and LT235/85R16 LR-G

You do need to be sure your wheels have the load & inflation rating to support the tire.

 

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I've run Goodyear Wranglers on several trucks and now on my Jeep Wrangler, have had very good luck with them. I am surprised that a car hauler came with them on it as they are not designed to be used on a trailer. I would suggest that one should use an ST tire on any car hauler because of the number of plies on the sidewalls, I want even run automotive tires on a tow dolly, and especially on my car hauler. I started this yesterday before tireman9 had responded, but was called away a did not finish. I have re read the OP and saw that you were referring to Wrangler II, I can not find any reference to wrangler II to know if ST or not, so I agree with Roger that they do appear too aggressive for load bearing purpose.

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On 10/10/2018 at 7:30 AM, AndyShane said:

....I specifically requested Goodyear tires on a car-hauler trailer custom-built for me last year. It arrived with Goodyear Wrangler II LT tires, late 2014 manufacture dates. I shrugged off the age of the tires, and accepted the unit....

Goodyear has nerve putting three year old tires on a brand new trailer.

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FIVE.  It's the other way around.  I would never have accepted the trailer!!! :angry: Unless it was a brother-in-law deal, why insist on a "Brand" lug, tire?  We got anything from a 12 foot single axle to a 42 foot triple axle goose neck trailer and none are running lug or AT tires!  :wacko:

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16 hours ago, FIVE said:

Goodyear has nerve putting three year old tires on a brand new trailer.

I doubt that Goodyear had anything to do with putting those tires on that trailer, they don't build the trailers or choose the tires.:wub:

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I have a 24 foot Featherlite enclosed trailer and run the 235/85 R16 Sailuns, so far so good. It is an all steel casing and reasonably priced. At this point 2 years old and look good, minimal wear. I agree with Carl who would put a lugged style, rough terrain oriented tire on a trailer unless they thought it looked cool???

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On 10/10/2018 at 7:30 AM, AndyShane said:

My practice is to inflate to sidewall placard pressure

Could this be part of the problem? If the trailer was only loaded to about 50% of load capacity but the tires were inflated to their max pressure, they'd be over-inflated in my book. I'm not an expert on tires, but I have to ask what the implications are of running tires at their max pressure, specifically as it relates to the damage detailed above.

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1 hour ago, richard5933 said:

Could this be part of the problem? If the trailer was only loaded to about 50% of load capacity but the tires were inflated to their max pressure, they'd be over-inflated in my book. I'm not an expert on tires, but I have to ask what the implications are of running tires at their max pressure, specifically as it relates to the damage detailed above.

That would depend on the tire and load rating. Most automotive tires have much lower sidewall pressure rating than an ST tire, automotive is rated for a much lower load and a higher speed rating, most are only 2 ply sidewall, while an ST rated tire has a higher load rating and a slower speed rating, usually 6 ply or higher. The best practice is to buy the correct tire, and drive according to the speed rating. If an ST tire it will have the correct max weight stamped and the pressure is set to match this, any weight up to this weight should be OK, if driven accordingly.

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Goodyear  Endurance ST is on most of our trailers, both here at Linda's & in Gladewater!  As for the rest of the big trailers, 19.5 & 22.5 we use, Kelly Armorsteel KRH!

Either the OP ordered the wrong Goodyear or he left it up to the manufacturer, who just happened to have 4, old tires laying around ! 

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Not to side with Goodyear, (believe me i'm not, I do not like their product) but they are LT tires on a trailer application. Car and light truck tires are not designed to scrub in turns like a trailer does at every turn, even worse trying to back into a tight spot :wacko:. Cars and truck have steering, trailers are dragged around a turn. They just are not designed for it.

I constantly hear about cheap Chinese tire failures on trailers, I am 99% convinced its not the tire, its the end user. I have had many, many trailers over the years I have replaced tires when they wore out and when they had side walls breaking down from UV. They all had Chinese tires, the same ones I read about all day long failing, one set I got 10 years and almost 50,000 miles out of them. 

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Joe I would concur with you. Every time I have had a problem I could track it back to something stupid I did. That said I ran a set of 9.50 16.5 Bridgestone V steels on a heavy trailer for years, till they were so cracked up it was pitiful. They held the same air for years.  Finally sold the trailer while down sizing and and he changed the tires. Now I know better. 

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Joe.  The Endurance ST is not designated for car or LT, they are specific designed for trailer application...we use them on twin axle open, horse & car hauler trailers!

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On 10/14/2018 at 10:35 AM, manholt said:

Goodyear  Endurance ST is on most of our trailers, both here at Linda's & in Gladewater!  As for the rest of the big trailers, 19.5 & 22.5 we use, Kelly Armorsteel KRH!

Either the OP ordered the wrong Goodyear or he left it up to the manufacturer, who just happened to have 4, old tires laying around ! 

Carl, the tire in question is a failed Wrangler LT from the OP's post. The ST tire you mentioned should suffice in a trailer application.

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Joe.  You wrote it, LT on car hauling trailer, should be a ST. :P That's what Kay & I said.:)

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I do note that when there are tire problems, including actual "failure" it's common to say "My xxx brand tires failed, I will never buy xxx tires again".

Well sorry to tell you but there is no such thing as "Fail-Proof" tire. This was even mentioned by DOT spokesperson during the Ford Explorer rollover fiasco of 2000.

Today's tires are amazingly robust. Even when they are made in Japan, and we all remember how bad "Made In Japan" was when were growing up. As I pointed out in this thread previously the subject tire was not at all appropriate for heavy trailer application. Both the tire type / size was wrong and the tread pattern was wrong. for the application. Why is this the tire's fault?

If you put a truck tire with a heavy off-road mud traction tread design on the front of your 40' DP and had loud noise and vibration and harsh ride would that be the tire's fault? Would simply changing tire brands from say Bridgestone to Michelin solve the problems? No of course not.  From my experiences as a tire engineer, I can tell you that I can probably "fail" any tire in under an hour and under 50 miles if you let me set the conditions.

A tire is just a tool you use to get a job done. If you don't select the correct tool that is appropriate for the job you want to be done why is it the fault of the tool manufacturer? Think of the absolute best tool company. Now select one of their flat blade screwdrivers. OK now start using it as a chisel and pound on it as you try and cut through some rusty bolts. After cutting through a few bolts would you blame SK or MAC or  Snap-On or ???? if the point of the screwdriver is dented and chipped?

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Roger that is an outstanding response! I hope that is on your website, it should be mandatory reading on every website that talks about tires.

As to the conversation about ST tire pressures, very few mfgrs. recommend less than running sidewall air pressure, for a valid reason; tire scrubbing. I  saw a man make a spot turn with his 5er on hot blacktop(in TX), he rolled one tire enough to break the bead seal. While helping him change to the spare(Carlyle), I pointed out the sidewall pressure recommendation. Carlyle used to state in their warranty it was void if operated at less than sidewall pressure.

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On 10/14/2018 at 8:19 AM, richard5933 said:

Could this be part of the problem? If the trailer was only loaded to about 50% of load capacity but the tires were inflated to their max pressure, they'd be over-inflated in my book. I'm not an expert on tires, but I have to ask what the implications are of running tires at their max pressure, specifically as it relates to the damage detailed above.

Trailer application is not like Motorhome or tow vehicle or truck operation.  I cover "Interply Shear" extensively in my RV Tire blog (see my signature).

IMO as a tire expert, the damage as seen was not due to "over-inflation" but evidence of the abnormally high side loads trailer application puts on tires.

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