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Hankook 275/80/22.5 Vs Michelin same size

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Time to put new tires on the coach. Current MICHELIN is no longer available and the new tire is  X LINE ENERGY Z 275/80R 22.5 which are pretty expensive

I can’t seem to locate all the tech info on Hankook 275/80R22.5 which is listed in the FMCA Info. Called Hankook and this is there DH15 which is a match in diameter but have to check on load range and weight capacity. Any comments on what size replaces this and info on Hankook is appreciated 

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When I changed my eight Michelins in June, my first visit was to the MIchelin dealer to take advantage of the deal offered by Michelin through FMCA.  But I got the same story, " we don't make them any more."  Turns out that was a lucky break.  I put two Continenetal 315s on the front (and used the FMCA plan) and put six Toyo 295s on the rear (way cheaper than Michelins).  In hind sight, the Michelins were over rated and way over priced.  My Michelins cracked at five and a half years......no where near long enough or what they are charging.

If you are thinking about changing the size of the tires, here's a link that will show you what the true differences are:  https://tiresize.com/comparison/

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The DH15 is definitely a drive tire, not an all position tire or steer tire. I wouldn't try using them on the steer axle. They also don't seem to be available in 275/80R22.5 size, so they wouldn't be a direct substitute. The 295 size is wider, which may bring problems with clearance to suspension/steering components as well as dual clearance.

Uniroyal does have tires in the size you're looking for:

https://www.uniroyaltrucktires.com/tires/selector/results?l=WiEhITI3NS84MFIyMi41ISFmYWxzZSFmYWxzZSFmYWxzZSFmYWxzZSEhWiExMCEx

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I am running Continental  275/80R22.5 and they are as good or better than Michelin and were over $100.00 cheaper than Michelin through the tire program. 

Bill

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41 minutes ago, jleamont said:

295/75R22.5 is VERY close to the same size. Close enough to run along side of the 275/80R22.5.

It's very close except for the width. About an inch additional width, which may or may not be a problem.

On our coach someone installed 315s instead of the proper 12R22.5 tires. All dimensions are nearly identical except for the extra inch of width. That extra width is enough to cause the tire to rub on the air bag mounting plates when the steering wheel is fully turned in either direction. Width matters and can be catastrophic.

On some coaches, the rims do not provide adequate spacing on the duals to permit installation of the wider tires.

Not saying it isn't possible to substitute these for the original tire size, just that it is imperative to do the necessary homework and math to ensure safe operation.

There is also a slight chance that wider tires can reduce traction in wet/slippery conditions, but that's usually only when tires go really wide.

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1 hour ago, jleamont said:

Close enough to run along side of the 275/80R22.5.

I agree. I would bet you could go measure a stack of 275/80R22.5 tires and find more variation in diameter. Also on the width keep in mind on the width the one inch is actually only one half inch on each side. I would bet you can change the width at the middle of the sidewall more that by changing air preshure.

 

47 minutes ago, richard5933 said:

There is also a slight chance that wider tires can reduce traction in wet/slippery conditions, but that's usually only when tires go really wide.

It is proven that tread design and composition is a much much bigger factor in traction than a inch of width. Keep in mind wider tires can hydroplane faster.

Bill 

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23 minutes ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

Also on the width keep in mind on the width the one inch is actually only one half inch on each side. I would bet you can change the width at the middle of the sidewall more that by changing air preshure.

That extra 1/2" on each side is more than enough to cause interference with steering and/or suspension parts. You're right, that it's not usually a problem. Unless it is. That's why I was suggesting that before just slapping different sized tires on there the proper homework is done to prevent possibly catastrophic problems.

In my situation, the interference between the air bag mounting plates and the tires would possibly cause both a tire blowout and an air bag failure. Obviously something that I'm hoping to avoid, which is why money is being spent to mount the proper size tires.

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Witch brings up the point about 10.5 to 14.0 inch wide tires that all OTR's in Europe and Russia use!  They are not slipping and sliding in the snow or rain...they are designed for 2 tires per drive axle (one on each side).  Buses run them also.  I have in the past year, seen them here!

I suspect we will be running 4-6 tires on coaches here, instead off 6-8, in the near future! IMO.

I ran 295's on all my 8 tires, then 315 steer &  295's and now I have all 315's BF Goodrich by Michelin at 2/3 the cost. No problem in over 11,000 miles in 8 months!  3 of the months was in NE coast and all maritime provident's Canada...they got some bad roads there!!! 

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Carl - I believe you're talking about what are called "super singles". Many semis use them instead of dual tires on the drive axles. I've seen reports from drivers where they had to take off the super singles and return to duals because the super singles didn't give them adequate traction on wet/slippery roads. Anecdotal, but relevant.

The basic theory is that as you increase surface area of the tire in contact with the road, you increase friction/traction. This works until you get to the point of diminishing returns, at which the friction/traction starts to be reduced and goes down. If you increase the surface area too much, the weight per sq. inch goes down, and then things get wonky.

Adding more surface/contact area to the tires might help on dry pavement, but make things worse on wet or slippery pavement. It's all a balancing act, and this is not a simple thing. There are reasons that the engineers put the tires they do on vehicles, and without good reason I don't feel that I'm qualified to override their judgement.

All that said, my main point was to make sure that the extra width would fit without causing problems. It often does, but not always.

 

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2 hours ago, richard5933 said:

In my situation, the interference between the air bag mounting plates and the tires would possibly cause both a tire blowout and an air bag failure.

If I  only had 1/2 inch of clearance I would be shaving off some of the mounting plates or adjusting the steering stops.

Bill

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14 minutes ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

If I  only had 1/2 inch of clearance I would be shaving off some of the mounting plates or adjusting the steering stops.

Bill

Yes, those are other options.

I know I have done complete mechanical inspections on a couple of Foretravels who have gone from 275/80R22.5 to 295/75R22.5 and had to both cut a little off the air bag mounting plate (no big deal) AND slightly adjust the cut angle to keep from having the tire contact the drag link-- easy 2 minute adjustment with the Sheppard M100 steering box.

Again, no big deal but needs to be done.

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Isn't it easier to just put the proper size tires on?

If I trim the mounting plates, then the tire will contact the air bag itself. Not any better.

Adjusting steering stops on my coach is done in the hydraulic system, not by physically moving the stop. Adjusted properly, there is 3/8" clearance between the steering components and the stop. The steering is 45 years old and I just don't see the wisdom of messing with it and possibly opening a Pandora's box when a simple solution is at hand.

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32 minutes ago, richard5933 said:

Adjusting steering stops on my coach is done in the hydraulic system, not by physically moving the stop. Adjusted properly, there is 3/8" clearance between the steering components and the stop. The steering is 45 years old and I just don't see the wisdom of messing with it and possibly opening a Pandora's box when a simple solution is at hand.

Yes, if a Sheppard M100 steering box (and perhaps others) changing cut angles is a matter of turning a small exterior screw a few degrees.

BTW, I use a 1/4" chunk of metal to set clearance between mechanical stop and steering sector max angle.

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31 minutes ago, wolfe10 said:

Yes, if a Sheppard M100 steering box (and perhaps others) changing cut angles is a matter of turning a small exterior screw a few degrees.

Correct - the manual also calls for using a pressure gauge to properly set the cut angles. But, as with anything on a 45-year-old machine, there's always the risk of something else going wrong. I've had screws break off, parts get stuck, etc. doing some really simple things on past classic vehicles. No desire to wake a sleeping dragon if I don't have to. I'm replacing the tires one way or the other, so it just makes sense to do it with the correct size tires and not have to worry.

For information's sake in case anyone's wondering, the coach originally came with bias ply tires with a G load rating. The 12R22.5 radial tires are an H load rating, and rated for much more than I will be carrying. I think I'll have about 3,000 lbs of headroom on the front axle, and much more on the rear. The 315s on the coach now carry an L load rating, and are really too much tire for the coach.

Back to the original topic of the thread, my point was only to point out to the OP that it's necessary to do the math and be safe when switching tire sizes. I'm sure that others have safely substituted a comparable tire size for their original tires, but that doesn't mean that it will be safe to do so on the OP's coach.

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Just me. My coach came with 295/80R22.5 tires on it and it was set for the best steering and turning radius and I see no reason to vary from that. No cutting, grinding or adjusting needs to be done. I may be wrong but I trust that the engineer's at Roadmaster to  know a lot more then I do. (well sometimes)

Herman

 

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As you said, "You have a Roadmaster!"  You could put 19" tires on that chassis & still have the best ride out there today!

 

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If you are looking at rear position then you need to compare the "dual Spacing" spec, not a measurement of a stack of tires. for your current and any proposed tires. Dual spacing is controlled by wheel offset.

Also need to select tires that are rated for your wheel width.

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1 hour ago, tireman9 said:

If you are looking at rear position then you need to compare the "dual Spacing" spec, not a measurement of a stack of tires. for your current and any proposed tires. Dual spacing is controlled by wheel offset.

Also need to select tires that are rated for your wheel width.

Well if you read what I posted you would see I was talking about the diameter not wheel spacing. There is 0.1" difference in diameter.

Bill 

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23 hours ago, hermanmullins said:

Just me. My coach came with 295/80R22.5 tires on it and it was set for the best steering and turning radius and I see no reason to vary from that. No cutting, grinding or adjusting needs to be done. I may be wrong but I trust that the engineer's at Roadmaster to  know a lot more then I do. (well sometimes)

Herman

 

Ditto....I just put on the same size tires that came on the coach.  That makes it easy and you know everything will "fit."

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BandM, Check out the Sailun 295/75R22.5 in either  14 or 16 ply. This tire is 1/10" taller, and 8/10" wider than that Michelin 275/80R22.5. I think the  cost is very reasonable.

As to locating a nearby dealer, usually if the  dealer carries Cooper tires they also carry Sailun truck tires(which btw are made in Vietnam-not China)

I bought a set after walking around at truck stops and observing  HDT steer tires. I run 275/70R22.5, LR H. My final bill was $1,280 in 2017 for all 6, mounted, balances, installed, including taxes.

During the past 2 years these tires have performed flawlessly, and I think ride better than the old Goodyears I removed.

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14 minutes ago, RayIN said:

BandM, Check out the Sailun 295/75R22.5 in either  14 or 16 ply. This tire is 1/10" taller, and 8/10" wider than that Michelin 275/80R22.5. I think the  cost is very reasonable...

Not trying to nitpick or beat a dead horse, but other than possible cost savings what would be the reason in this case to change tire size when the proper size is available?

The increase in width of nearly an inch could make a difference, both on the steer tires and the duals in the rear. Sometimes close enough isn't close enough and can lead to problems.

I'd understand if the size wasn't available, but that's not the case here. Clearly the new size worked for you, but it may not be a good substitute in all cases.

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The chassis builder, puts on the rims and tires that the coach builder want's & has nothing to do with Engineering!  Has everything to do with the coach builder "Bean Counter"!  They determine what goes into an RV !  That was not an issue in 1964/74/84 and even 1994, but it's become a big issue since 2011.  Every cent is accounted for!  My coach came with rims that could carry 315'..so did FIVE's coach, mine came with 8 Michelin 295...cheaper than 315's, his came with 6, 295's and 2 steer tires of 315!  I found out that I could run 315's on all 8, no rubbing on drive tires and no interference on steer tires...the point is that it's my dime, not the coach builders! 

Whatever you want in any coach, you can get on your $$$...They will build it, but you can forget about the 30/40% off MSRP. 

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