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On my 2016 Tuscany Coach with Cummins 450, the dash air has never really been too cold, actually more cool than cold. I just added Freon to the system. I put about 16 oz in, with the capacity being 2.5lbs or 40 oz. Gauge I used to insert Freon has the green area which ranges from 25 to 50. When I finished adding what I did the air coming out of the dash was colder than it has ever been and the gauge was reading about 33, 34 in the green. 

Did I put enough in or should I add some additional. I saw the warnings about not overcharging the system.

Any help would be appreciated

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At what ambient temperature,  and verify that the condenser fan was running? Low side PSI (what you are reading) IS temperature dependent.

What was temperature at the return (inside coach) and what was temperature at the center vent with the fan on high, engine at 1,200-1,300 RPM?

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Brett, temperature here in Florida is 88, condenser fan was not running when I first started adding Freon but did come on and was running through the remainder of this process. I believe the low side (blue cap) is where I connected hose and gauge and after adding 16 oz it was reading 33 in the green on the gauge. I do not know the exact temperature coming out of the returns but the engine was idling most of the time, I did increase the rpm for less than a minute and the air coming out was significantly cooler than when I started.  

Obviously I have no idea how much was in the system when I started which has lead to my question about 33 on the gauge and did I do enough.

First time I have tried this with my motorhome, have done it with my wifes car in the past.

Thank you

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Mypopslou, I recommend you get professional help rather than depend on the internet.  You can easily do more damage that will cost you more than a certified A/C tech.

Ken

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FWIW, I had the same problem when we bought this MH in 2013. I bought a large can of refrigerant that has the gauge showing low/OK/high. I  added refrigerant until the gauge was in the middle of the green/OK. Ever since the dash air has measured about 40-45°F, regardless of outside temperature.

I can't ever recall reading about someone ruining their auto air conditioner with the self-use containers.

Edit: This utube video tutorial was informative to me.

 

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Listen to TXicman. He is a certified refrigeration guy.  What chassis do you have. I have Freightliner so I took mine to the Freighliner place. They determined it was a leak. Replaced what had to be replaced and the problem was solved.  Prior to that I took it to two garage (mechanics) and the fix they did, did not last.

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The low pressure side should be no higher then 30 to 35 lbs. on the low side of the gauge set.  To high and one gets into high pressure issues that can get real expensive quickly.

Rich.

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Rich, the problem is he isn't using "real gages" he has one of those charge kits with just a color coded gage. If it is in the middle of the green and cooling ok he should be ok. When it leaks down again I would take it to someone who can do a proper leak check.

Bill

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On 5/24/2020 at 4:30 PM, WILDEBILL308 said:

Rich, the problem is he isn't using "real gages" he has one of those charge kits with just a color coded gage. If it is in the middle of the green and cooling ok he should be ok. When it leaks down again I would take it to someone who can do a proper leak check.

Bill

Bill, Sniffers and UV dye work will when looking for those nasty little leaks!

Rich.

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8 hours ago, DickandLois said:

Bill, Sniffers and UV dye work will when looking for those nasty little leaks!

Rich.

When you need to know, use a helium leak detector. 

https://heliumleakdetection.net/what-is-helium-leak-detection/

I use to have one at work. 

The OP may be lucky as the stuff he used has a sealer in it and it might fix the problem for the season. 

Bill

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2016 hmmm  Did you put R134a into a R1234yf  system?  Also where is the condenser.  If in the rear 40 feet away the efficiency is loss from that distance.  If you got cold air while driving, consider yourself lucky.   

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Thank you for all your help, I put R134A in the system as that is the type of refrigerant listed on system. The gauge read 33 when I was finished and I had cold air coming into coach. I have not driven it yet but hope that it is better than it was.

Thanks for all of your help 

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1 hour ago, huffypuff said:

2016 hmmm  Did you put R134a into a R1234yf  system?  Also where is the condenser.  If in the rear 40 feet away the efficiency is loss from that distance.  If you got cold air while driving, consider yourself lucky.   

Ray, The 2 Freon's are compatible. The difference is price and 1234yf is flammable. Because of the molecular structure the compressors tend to run cooler, but a spark can light the 1234yf. Not much of an issue in Diesel coaches, but I do wonder about gas powered vehicles as the ignition systems age. There is a flammability warning in the safety data sheet. Some AC Compressor builders are using a different PAG oil for the 1234yf.

Rich.  

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4 hours ago, DickandLois said:

Ray, The 2 Freon's are compatible. The difference is price and 1234yf is flammable. Because of the molecular structure the compressors tend to run cooler, but a spark can light the 1234yf. Not much of an issue in Diesel coaches, but I do wonder about gas powered vehicles as the ignition systems age. There is a flammability warning in the safety data sheet. Some AC Compressor builders are using a different PAG oil for the 1234yf.

Rich.  

When I got certified on the new refrigerant we also had a class and a test to be certified.    If you top off a A/C unit with r134a  in a r1234yf  unit you contaminate the system which is illegal.  

Please read number 6 in the link.  

https://macsworldwide.wordpress.com/2016/10/24/keeping-the-facts-straight-on-r-1234yf/

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On 5/27/2020 at 12:53 PM, DickandLois said:

Ray, The 2 Freon's are compatible. The difference is price and 1234yf is flammable. Because of the molecular structure the compressors tend to run cooler, but a spark can light the 1234yf. Not much of an issue in Diesel coaches, but I do wonder about gas powered vehicles as the ignition systems age. There is a flammability warning in the safety data sheet. Some AC Compressor builders are using a different PAG oil for the 1234yf.

Rich.  

Speaking of flammable, the ideal refrigerant would be propane-if one could live with the obvious drawback.(pun intended)

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