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shmily18

Class A Coach Cover

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I have just purchased a 2014 Newmar Ventana 3436 and will be storing it outside, I live in Northern California and although the winters are mild it still gets blazing hot. Our plan is to travel as often as possible but we still want a durable, high quality cover with a good warranty that can stand up to heavy rains, high wind and intense spells of hot weather. I have a copy of the Oct. 17 MotorHome magazine that reviews more than 8 manufacturers but would sure like to hear from some owners based on real life experience.

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Your coach is built to do that...stand up to the elements....If your property is big enough, I would Google...Ranch portable enclosures.  They cover you, like a car port, made out off very durable material and since they are portable it's not taxed as a home improvement. 

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Another vote for not using a cover. I've read lots of material about these and bottom line for me was that the potential for damage from the cover far exceeded the potential for benefit. The heavy rain will inevitably get trapped under the cover, the intense heat will make it a breeding ground for mold, and the high winds will whip the cover around no matter how well it's tied down and scuff and rub against the finish.

Better off using UV blocking window covers inside to prevent sun damage to the interior, if even that. Your existing window blinds are probably already all you need.

The only time I've used a cover was temporarily while we located and repaired a small water leak. Otherwise, the only thing I'd consider would be some type of carport or other structure that allowed air to flow and that didn't make contact with the motor home itself.

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A few more considerations when using a cover...how will you get it on the roof...they are heavy, and where will you put it when using the coach?

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Not a fan of covers for RVs. They are bulky, seldom fit properly (most are universal fits) and tend to wear quickly, i.e. UV rays destroying their fabric integrity as well as when becoming saturated from rainfall can result in mold/mildew to the surface . They also create a haven for pest, i.e. insects to collect underneath not to mention the pain of putting them on, tethering and pulling them off. Anyone who makes them will speak to their protective properties and durability but IMO, that's just marketing hype.

You'd be far better off erecting an overhead enclosure if your residential property code will permit otherwise consider off-site covered storage facility even better if you can find one that offers constant shore-power connection.

Maybe not the answers you're seeking.

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Interesting to note, we spend as much or more on our "Rolling Earthquake", than we do on our house! :P Yet, we balk at paying for a garage to store our toy and keep it out of harms way!! :wacko:

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I have some bad experiences to share with these covers and I am not a fan.  Both our coaches came with covers, the C was an Adco almost new, not used often, it scratched up the gel coat on the corners and left mold behind that got into the gel coat. The A came with a brand new one in the box, Adco top of the line. I put it on one 1st year we had it, also the only year I had a mice/mold and scratches on the coach from it. Apparently the mice loved to eat the cover also as it apparently attracted them :wacko: Never again! 

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Thanks to all, I hear you all loud and clear. Good point on home vs "Rolling Earthquake" :), maybe I just need to spend more time on the road, thanks again to all. I'm all ears if anyone else has any comments...

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Keep it protected via waxes, polishes and UV protection spray. Tires parked on rubber or wood and covered when not in use.

enjoy!

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Joe.  Our coach shed (end of year garage) for both rig's are cement, covered by a thick layer of epoxy, works the same as rubber...we have never "Covered" the tires!  Linda in 36 years and 5 rigs, me in 51 years and 17 rigs!  Tires are changed out in 6-7 years, weather you cover or not! :blink: Never even knew about covers, until early 1990..

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I agree with the NO COVER policy.  Wind causes the cover to wear the paint at the top corners and mold is a problem.  If you have snow it is a real big issue especially if you want to move the RV and have to take it off,  almost impossible with snow or ice on the roof.  Best advice is wash and wax.  Use a good UV protectant.  Structure covers are the best but local codes can prohibit construction of those unless you have lots of room,  square footage or acreage.

My current RV has vinyl graphics on the sides and the sun is really harsh on them.  Next coach is going to have full body paint which I plan to wax often.

 

 

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My experience has been different from many expressed above. I agree that a building or metal car storage building is the best, but the fabric covers shouldn’t be ignored. Not all of us have the space or legal ability to put in a (much more expensive) garage or metal cover. I just purchased my class A last year, but I’ve used Adco covers for over 15 years on my Travel Trailers before that. I had no problems with wear on the paint. I believe that is because in Northern CA we don’t get the kind of constant winds some of the country experiences. Yes, if you leave the cover on all winter you might get some mold on the roof, but I never had any problems with mold and the paint, as I wax the unit before storing it. I bought an Adco cover for the class A right after I bought it, and used it over last winter with no problems. 

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Using a cover is the last thing I would do.  The hassle of the bulk of the fabric plus the wear and tear on the finish,  although you find a few individuals that use them with some degree of success.  Absolutely a garage or at least a roof over the motorhome is mandatory in my book.  Just my own opinion.  It doesn't make sense to me after spending all that money on a coach that you leave it outside.

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I've used a cover for a short time and have given up on it.  It is hard to haul up on the roof, you have to very very careful not to step onto a sky light or A/C unit cover and other hazards.  Remember each time you want to use your coach or take it for a quick run to 'exercise' the engine, tranny etc ...  you will have to take it off and put it back on again.  The other BIG thing is the damage it will due to your corners.  It will rub the paint or jelcoat off and the generally cause more damage than good.  

Use a good wax and UV protectant.  I wish I could erect a cover but local gov't codes don't allow it.  I just polish and wax, polish and wax.

Edited by struthers495
Added two lines.

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On ‎5‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 3:35 PM, struthers495 said:

I've used a cover for a short time and have given up on it.  It is hard to haul up on the roof, you have to very very careful not to step onto a sky light or A/C unit cover and other hazards.  Remember each time you want to use your coach or take it for a quick run to 'exercise' the engine, tranny etc ...  you will have to take it off and put it back on again.  The other BIG thing is the damage it will due to your corners.  It will rub the paint or jelcoat off and the generally cause more damage than good.  

Use a good wax and UV protectant.  I wish I could erect a cover but local gov't codes don't allow it.  I just polish and wax, polish and wax.

That may be so for permanent structures. I'd look into installing something that's "temporary", i.e., that can be dismantled easily and moved. Usually such structures will not require a permit, or result in a property reassessment. I have a friend who installed a frame over which is covered by a canvas-like material which serves to put a "roof", and sidewall covers, completely housing his 33 foot RV. He informed me it's a temporary structure, can be easily disassembled, and did not require a permit, nor a reassessment. Perhaps your community has similar ordinances?

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I am just curious, how much does a cover weigh to cover a 40 foot motorhome, TT or Fifth Wheel? And how do you get it up on top to cover the unit? I'm not trying to be funny I would really like to know.

Herman

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The cover I had weight approximately 35lbs.Elements Premium model from CW.  It had a storage sack with a large strap that I would put it around my shoulder like a back pack and climb up the ladder. Not to enjoyable. Fortunately it was only for the first winter of owning the coach now it’s in a heated garage and the cover is in its sack and collecting dust. But there is all types of covers out there with all different weights to them. 

Phil

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OBIWAN.

What your referring to, is sold mainly for Farm & Ranch storage of hay or farm equipment.  They come in various sizes from 20' x 30' x 10' to 80' x 200' x 20'.  Cost for a 30' x 60' x 18'...perfect for any DP coach or 40' + fiver is $11,000-$16,000.  Not permanent, movable, but withstands wind to 85mph and totally weather resistant.  No permit required.

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9 hours ago, manholt said:

No permit required

This might not require a permit by you, but around here they'd consider that a structure and want a permit. They don't care how permanent it is, just if it is safe and meets code. Put up something around here without a permit and get caught, and they'll charge you triple the fees to get the permit retroactively. That is if they decide that it's a permissible project and allow it at all.

The good news is that almost every municipality has posted their codes online, so it's pretty easy to know ahead of time what requires a permit and what does not. Better to check and not assume no permit is required.

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Sorry, my bad...we live in the country, outside City Limits!  I forgot to mention that.  We are also AG exempt.  Homestead and over 65!  Most important part, we live in Texas! :wub:

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1 hour ago, manholt said:

Sorry, my bad...we live in the country, outside City Limits!  I forgot to mention that.  We are also AG exempt.  Homestead and over 65!  Most important part, we live in Texas! :wub:

that's a fact, Jack-

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