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Spare Tire yes or no

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There seems to be a lot of conversation regarding the need for a Spare Tire on today's Vehicle/RV. If you are "On the Fence," in considering adding a Spare Tire to your RV, I would suggest that you ask Google, How many Flat Tires occurred in the USA last? I seen the figure of 220 Million Flat Tires on several sites, although I find this very hard to believe. Additionally. I've found that the average person will have 5 Flat Tires in his life. The point is, they happen and all too often when you least expect it.
We consider a Spare Tire an essential piece of equipment for us to have on board our RV, although ironically we hope we never have to use it! We view it like you would a Boat's Life Preserver or House Fire Extinguisher, you hope you will never need it, but you better know how to use it should the time arrive. I'll be happy if we avoid the inconvenience from just one Flat Tire! We  installation the "Roadmaster Spare Tire Carrier" on our PleasureWay XL. The Spare Tire Carrier is inserted into the Trailer Hitch's Receiver and the Tire is attached with bolts. Although my Steel Wheel/Tire weighs 65 lbs it swings down easily using the lowering lever. The Spare Tire Carrier also has the option of either another Trailer/Tow Dolly or in our case a StowAway Storage Trunk attached to it.
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Ok!  Welcome to the Forum!

Is that it?  Just a unsubstantiated comment.  5 flats in my life?  I have had dozens, between Coaches, trailers, cars, tractors and lawnmowers!

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Dear Manholt, maybe I wasn't clear in asking my question, i.e. Spare Tire yes or no? I stated the reasons, IMHO why we are adding one to our Class B+ MH. You suggested that my comments were unsubstantiated, I was simply quoting the information I found on the internet to help me make an informed decidsion. What is your source, if you have one? If so, I am very interested in learning another point-of-view, facts would be beneficial. I see you have 8653 Posts. Are all of them as well thought out as the above Post.  

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bigpapaporshe, as Carl said welcome to the forum! I also sometimes overlook the jist of a question when it is part of the subject line, please forgive Carl for jumping the gun. For that matter we all certainly make mistakes. As for your question about whether to or not to carry a spare tire is certainly personal choice, as for me, I will not knowingly leave home without a spare tire, although my coach tire is quiet a bit heavier than yours, and just guessing, mine weighs in excess of 250#. Very rare to have a flat but I would rather be prepared than to wind up paying $900.00 for a tire that I can buy at my home base for $450.00.

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I do not carry a spare tire since my size is quite common, and I am not brand loyal. Some of the MH owners in the Alaska and Canadian Maritimes caravans do carry a spare because MH tires are quite expensive, especially away from home, and some sizes are hard to locate even here in the U.S.A.

Some factors for installing just one new tire are dual tire applications. Just 5/16" diameter difference will rapidly wear both tires in a dual application. https://www.truckinginfo.com/154830/mismatching-dual-tires-a-sure-fire-way-to-kill-two-tires-at-once

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bigpapaporshe.

My bad. :(  Brain fart, I did not click to your coach & if I had a Class B, I would be caring a spare! :) When I had Class A gas coaches, they where between 22' to 33', 16" to 19.5" tires and came with a mounted spare tire, in a case built in at the rear of coach (1967-1996)!  Pre Radial/steel belted tires, I would have a flat about every trip.  I have wrapped Duck tape around a leak and limped into a garage, more than once!  The last 23 years, they have all been 22.5" and I do not have the tools or ability to change my tire!  Also, in the past 23 years, I have had no tire problem...Lucky me! :) 3 DP's. 

I average 14,000 miles a year & no, I'm not full time!

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One thing to keep in mind when it comes to statistics, we always must consider what is driving them. You ask anyone that has ever experienced a tire failure what happened, it was never their fault, they were just driving along and the tire went flat or the tire just fell apart. They will fail to mention that last month they drove over the tire speed rating for 30 miles, or they ran up over a curb 5 months ago in a campground that was the real root cause of the failure they experienced months later. Once the tire has been inspected by a professional and x-rayed the real cause of the failure comes out.

Being the topic is should I carry a spare tire, my response...if you have room and or an odd size tire that potentially would be difficult to locate in the event of an emergency, I would do so, even if you have to call someone to change it. Why? Simply because we all make mistakes and could have caused some sort of damage to a tire that has not showed that damage yet or a tires condition was never properly inspected by a properly trained technician. We assume the shop that just did our maintenance was capable and was actually going to inspect your tires when all they did was check the air pressures and in their mind and yours was a thorough inspection. 

I am in the vehicle maintenance and trucking industry, I will say from my experience 99% of tire failures (including recaps) are caused by the vehicle operator. Let me elaborate on this, curbing (and or general damage), excessive scrubbing (figure 8's in a parking lot with a tandem or tag axle that doesn't lift), low tire pressures and the hardest to avoid sometimes is striking road debris cause all of the premature tire failures. Road debris is a big one, I have found that if you maintain a safe following distance and look ahead while driving you can avoid most road debris. If anyone else on here is "Smith system trained" you understand where I am coming from. 

Tire reliability and technology has come a long way in the last 30 years. 

 

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Last September, I came back from Pigeon Forge Tn., thirty miles from home there was a blowout on inside dual drive tire, I had a spare tire, not wheel with me, I called for roadside assistance and had them replace the tire. I drove home (30 miles), then had the other tire of that same dual set replaced. I moved to a local campground for a month, (15 miles away) from home. While there I noticed that the tag axel tire directly behind the new set of duals had leaked and was low. I then put a new tire on that spot, looking for what caused the leak on the leaky tire, I found a small thread of the steel belt from the blown tire had entered the tag tire. Yes anything goes with tires.

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Always carry a spare. When you're driving in remote areas this is even more important, but I think it holds even in more populated areas. It will be possible in nearly every location to find someone willing/able to help you change a tire, whether on a large Class A or on a smaller Class B. However, you may not be able to find the size/type tire that you need. Especially if you have a flat on Saturday evening of a three-day weekend. For a small Class B without space to store a mounted spare, the hitch-mounted swing-away carriers are a good solution. Pray you never need it, but be prepared for when you do.

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DB, I resemble that remark!

I'm like others, unable to handle the big 22.5" tires weighing so much, let alone carrying a jack to hoist up a portion of 47,000 pounds. I would never use my leveling system to try and raise a tire off the ground.  If I were going to travel to a remote area I may purchase a tire, no rim, and throw it in the back of the TOAD.  Roadside service is pretty available and they have the tools to change tires.

As for your Class B, yes, your idea of the tire on the hitch is a good one, as long as the hitch can withstand it.

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I have always carried a spare in the last 44 years of motor homing.  When I became too old to do all the lifting I installed an electric winch to load it up into storage position.  I have had to change several tires over the years.

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17 hours ago, bigpapaporsche said:

Dear Manholt, maybe I wasn't clear in asking my question, i.e. Spare Tire yes or no? I stated the reasons, IMHO why we are adding one to our Class B+ MH. You suggested that my comments were unsubstantiated, I was simply quoting the information I found on the internet to help me make an informed decidsion. What is your source, if you have one? If so, I am very interested in learning another point-of-view, facts would be beneficial. I see you have 8653 Posts. Are all of them as well thought out as the above Post.  

Well without knowing which class "B" you have it is hard to make an good recommendation. This is where if you add your coach information to your signature it will help to get better answers. Most of the "B" coaches run on 16" tires and those are easier to handle and store. You also need to have a jack and large lug wrench and for safety a jack stand if you are going to change  your own tire. You will have to find storage for everything.

I would be inclined to carry a spare if a good place could be found.

So now I am curious as to which "B" you have as I saw one going down the road that had what looked like a molded spare cover on the back. 

Bill

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Thanks, I will update my profile. It a 2017 PleasureWay XT Twin Beds, on a Sprinter Chassis. I am still working with Roadmaster to get their Model 195125 Spare Tire Carrier to fit correctly. I am having a Spare Tire Cover (HardShell)  custom made by Boomerrang in Calif. They are going to paint the Big Flat Cover Plate the same as the RV color, which should compliment the Stainless Steel Outer Band. I am also modifying a Trailer Hitch Extension so I can attach a Stowaway Storage Trunk to stores 2 Folding Bikes. Hopefully I'll meet some of you guys in Atlanta. Attached is a Mock-up so far, not completed yet. Note, as you might imagine, our RV's License Plate is partially hidden by the Storage Trunk. My solution was to copy my original Ohio Plate and mount the copied Plate on the Trunk, it almost impossible to see the difference. Is it Memorex or Real. 

DSCF1989.jpg

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Looks like a doable system to me!  Don't know about Atlanta, but we will be in Perry, GA., The 12th of Feb. in Handicap 50 amp Parking!  Have a red Jeep with all the appropriate Masonic stickers in back.  Herman Mullins, will also have a Meet & Greet at his coach, it will be announced on the Forum, as to space #, when!

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That's a good looking rig.:) here is what I use to use two different hitches at one time. The one shown is about a 5" spacing and works great but I also have another that I cut the two bars that space the two receivers and put a 12" extender there, this is very handy. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Steel-Dual-Hitch-Bicycle-Rack-2-Receiver-Extender-Trailer-Boat-Extension-Black/391952409899?epid=8017023527&hash=item5b422f252b:g:swkAAOSwiqFaXmov:rk:44:pf:0

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On 2/14/2019 at 7:42 PM, bigpapaporsche said:

Thanks, I will update my profile. It a 2017 PleasureWay XT Twin Beds, on a Sprinter Chassis. I am still working with Roadmaster to get their Model 195125 Spare Tire Carrier to fit correctly. I am having a Spare Tire Cover (HardShell)  custom made by Boomerrang in Calif. They are going to paint the Big Flat Cover Plate the same as the RV color, which should compliment the Stainless Steel Outer Band. I am also modifying a Trailer Hitch Extension so I can attach a Stowaway Storage Trunk to stores 2 Folding Bikes. Hopefully I'll meet some of you guys in Atlanta. Attached is a Mock-up so far, not completed yet. Note, as you might imagine, our RV's License Plate is partially hidden by the Storage Trunk. My solution was to copy my original Ohio Plate and mount the copied Plate on the Trunk, it almost impossible to see the difference. Is it Memorex or Real. 

 

3

Nice install.  You might consider some protection for that spare tire. Continuous exposure to the sun can result in a belt separation, EVEN WHEN MOUNTED ON THE CARRIER as seen here 34693mg.jpg

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Be sides the environmental protection benefits of a Spare Tire Cover, they also provide much better security and provide better appearance IMHO. I am having a custom Hardshell Spare Tire Cover being made right now, from Boomerang inc in Calif, eta 10 days or so. They are custom painting the Hardshell cover the same as the RV's body color and it has a Stainless Steel Rim Band, should compliment the back of the RV. I also hope to install a MB Emblem in the center. Attached to the Spare Tire Cover will be a Stowaway Storage Trunk  to store our 2 folding bikes.  

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On 2/14/2019 at 11:11 AM, wayne77590 said:

DB, I resemble that remark!

I'm like others, unable to handle the big 22.5" tires weighing so much, let alone carrying a jack to hoist up a portion of 47,000 pounds. I would never use my leveling system to try and raise a tire off the ground.  If I were going to travel to a remote area I may purchase a tire, no rim, and throw it in the back of the TOAD.  Roadside service is pretty available and they have the tools to change tires.

As for your Class B, yes, your idea of the tire on the hitch is a good one, as long as the hitch can withstand it.

I am well with-in its capacity. The Wheel/Tire assy weighs 60 lbs, plus the added Hitch/Carrier Parts 25  lbs, plus the Stowaway Trunk 45 lbs and the 2 bikes another 60 lbs = 190 lbs total. The total vertical  load Spec is 500 lbs.

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On 2/14/2019 at 3:11 PM, WILDEBILL308 said:

Well without knowing which class "B" you have it is hard to make an good recommendation. This is where if you add your coach information to your signature it will help to get better answers. Most of the "B" coaches run on 16" tires and those are easier to handle and store. You also need to have a jack and large lug wrench and for safety a jack stand if you are going to change  your own tire. You will have to find storage for everything.

I would be inclined to carry a spare if a good place could be found.

So now I am curious as to which "B" you have as I saw one going down the road that had what looked like a molded spare cover on the back. 

Bill

Thanks Bill for the good suggestions, I have updated my Profile. For the benefit of other our MH is a 2017 PleasureWay XL Twin bed, on a 2016 MB Sprinter Chassis.

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