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Bobmid

2006 Holiday Rambler Neptune "cage" under engine

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Any Neptune owners out there...  Do you have a "cage" installed under the engine?  Mine has one that looks aftermarket and attaches to the frame with 4, 5/16th bolts that have been welded (tacked) to the frame.  Appears the previous owner backed up over something and the "cage" got bent up and a couple of the bolts were sheared off.  I just was interested in knowing if other Neptune owners found this "cage".  It appears that it will help keep something from being thrown up into the engine belt and radiator.  I had to remove it to be able to get to the engine oil filter and fuel filters.  I attached a picture of it.  Need to know if I need to get a welder to reattach some bolts to the frame and reinstall it now that I have it mostly straightened out.  Thanks in advance!

2019-02-28_08_29_56.jpg

Edited by Bobmid
Attached a pic

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Bob, that looks to be something to protect against rock kick up's that the previous owner had made and installed. Perhaps before a trip to Alaska to keep the engine protected from road debris. I checked the brochure for that year and there is no mention of it and its not illustrated in any of the photos when it shows the powertrain. If it were me i'd leave it off

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That's totally what I thought.  Although this unit was bought in DEEP South Texas and only has 15K miles I don't think it went to Alaska, but it MAY have gone South into Mexico.  I'm going to leave it off.  It sure looked jury-rigged to me the way it was attached.  Since this is my first DP just wanted to check.  Thanks so much for replying!!!

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22 minutes ago, Bobmid said:

this unit was bought in DEEP South Texas  It sure looked jury-rigged to me the way it was attached.  

Down here in the South it's called Southern Engineering. :wub::lol:

Leaving it off would not hurt anything.

Herman

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That cage is a normal install from factory laying flat in front the swinging rock guard.  Protects the radiator from rocks and stones.  Don't leave home without it.  

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My 2012 Monaco Knight has one. What a great idea for a rear radiator Motorhome which is like a big vacuum under the engine trying to suck up everything into the radiator. 

While it won't cause a problem to leave it off. There might be a time where it could prevent something (like a tumble weed) getting sucked up into the fan :(

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My 2004 Holiday Rambler Endeavor has the same expanded metal rock guard but not the full width swinging rubber rock flap.

It's kind of a pain to remove to replace the oil filter, but I believe it's worth the effort to protect the radiator and fan blades.

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Something  new. Never seen one never seen or heard of one before. 

I also have never had a problem with anything outher than oil vapor being sucked into my radiator.(fixed that)  Never read about anyone having a problem with things hitting their radiator. If this is factorey I would rate it right along with the swinging rubber flap that is more for advertising than protection. That can be attributed to causing more damage than it prevents.

Bill

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Actually not a bad idea to have that grate/guard there.  Not that difficult to picture a rock being kicked up by a tire, hitting a fan blade and being propelled at high speed into the CAC.

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I know that our beast is a different species, but our coach came from the factory with a louvered belly pan under the entire engine bay. Ours serves two purposes - it helps direct airflow in the most optimal manner possible for engine cooling, and it prevents all kinds of road debris from getting sucked through the engine bay and/or radiator.

Before removing it, I'd want to know what the airflow patterns are in the rear of the coach - particularly when driving over grassy areas. I've seen some coaches create a virtual vortex behind/under the engine bay as they crawl through campgrounds, and it doesn't take much imagination to picture what the radiator would look like if that debris was somehow introduced into the radiator's air flow.

Some coaches can develop some pretty bizarre low-pressure zones under/behind/near the rear of the vehicle, so it might be a good idea to think this through before discarding this if it was factory installed.

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Thanks very much for all the opinions.  I've decided I'm going to find a welder and get him to tack some more bolts on the frame and I'll go ahead and reinstall it.  It's there, so might as well put it back on.  Again, THANKS for the help!!!

 

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I've never had or seen one!  Then again, I've always have had side radiator, DP's!  If you have a rear radiator, I can see the benefit. 

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Were this my MH, I would have it reinstalled, but while other engineering were taking place to replace it, I would improvise a trap door that would make easy access to the oil drain and to replace the oil filter without having to remove the entire cage. Piano hinges are cheap and readily available, use one bolt to provide for opening it up.

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21 hours ago, Bobmid said:

Thanks very much for all the opinions.  I've decided I'm going to find a welder and get him to tack some more bolts on the frame and I'll go ahead and reinstall it.  It's there, so might as well put it back on.  Again, THANKS for the help!!!

 

Bobmid, FYI. No welding should be performed on the coach, until the power is removed from the engine and transmission control boards. 

Best plan would be to contact the Chassis builder for the correct info before proceeding . 

Rich.

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Good point Rich. Also to prevent any electrical issues, it is alway best to have your ground clamp as to your weld as possible. I have seen a person welding on an object beling held up with a magnet between the ground clamp and the weld and demagnetize the magnet. Welding current does some strange things. Also I would consult the chassis mfg. to see if the chassi should be welded on. Most large trucks have stickers all over the chassis saying "Do Not Weld on Chassis".

Herman

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I haven't done it yet, but had thought about the DC welding current.  I thought it might be a good enough to just kill the master switches before I had the welding done.  The bolts were welded on at one point.....  I reinstalled it using the two remaining bolts and then used a couple of my heavy duty flexible duct straps to secure the other two points to the frame.  It's not going anywhere.  I think I just might leave it like that, and just be resigned to needing two duct straps every time I change the oil filter.  Again, thanks for the support!

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Rich is correct.  Chassis/RV manufactures have a set protocol of things to disconnect before doing electric welding.

Yes, batteries, but also Allison ECU, etc.

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I have the same problem on my coach, one of the bolts has broken loose from the frame.

The bolt heads are just tack welded to the frame without a full weld and with very little weld penetration.  I have considered fabricating some sort of bracket that can be clamped to the frame, just never have gotten around to it ,

Will put it on my list.

Jim

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Rather than welding, I would use the high-strength "glue" that''s advertised and sold at NAPA stores to fasten bolt heads to metal surfaces. I forget how much torque it withstands.  High-amp welding currents can do strange things to electronics.

Drilling N tapping the frame brings it's own set of problems and possible repercussions.

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My 2009 Monaco Cayman also has the cage as a stock item (I bought it new).  Interestingly, on mine, the two forward nuts are welded to the frame, but the two rear tabs attach with a loose bolt and nut through a hole in the frame.  You may consider that option rather than welding to the frame.  I love having it back there... but it is a pain when accessing the oil and fuel filter.

Good luck!

Ron

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