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Tyron Bands

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We have been looking at Tyron Bands for the front wheels of our coach (40' Damon Essence Diesel Pusher/Freightliner).

I wondered if anyone has installed these on their coach, and if they have experienced a blowout on the front wheels either with no bands or with them in place?

If so what was/is your experience?

If you had it to do over again, would you purchase them again?

I understand they do not prevent blowouts, but provide handling assistance by keeping the blown tire in place and on the wheel.

When I spoke to the representative, he priced them at $ 1,995.00 plus installation for the pair.

Can anyone either defend or deny this product. If so, why?

Thanks,

Patrick Bauer

F406967

Riverview, Florida

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Patrick,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

I am not familiar with the Tyron Bands-- in fact this is the first time I have heard of them.

However, Michelin has an EXCELLENT video John Anderson helped them make on handling blowouts in a Diesel Pusher.

For a free viewing, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CseABfJL1FM

ON EDIT: Thanks to jleamont, for posting the updated link-- changed since posted 5+ years ago.

THIS IS A MUST-VIEW FOR ANYONE DRIVING A MOTORHOME.

Brett Wolfe

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This is what Patrick is talking about: Visit tyron's Website.

And looking at that, I would rather see some run flat tires instead of bans around the inside of the wheels. It is not going to stop the blow out from occurring, thus will not stop body and other coach damage. And the cost is suppose to be around a $1000 for 16" wheels. You guess is as good as mine when we get up to 22.5.

I think a good tire pressure monitor would be a much better investment!!!

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The bands are sold / installed by Lazy Days. I attended a seminar where they were discussed and a video was shown. As of March this year they were $1900 installed (2) for 22.5 inch. They reportedly prevent the blown tire from collapsing into the well created when the wheel was mfg. (to make the tire easier to install), giving you more control of your vehicle at time of the blowout. If you are in the Tampa area, talking to them about it and watching the video might be worthwhile. I don't know if a tire pressure/temperature monitoring system will help or warn for a blow out.

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Just removed bands from my Rexhall Aerbus when all tires replaced. The dealer had no idea how to handle them and caused considerable additional labor to remove so tires could be replaced. I don't think I would have paid $2000 to have them installed. I did not reinstall.

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I just had tires replaced and the tire shop wasn't comfortable leaving them on mounting new tires so I have (2) 22.5 bands available, please make an offer.

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I had them on my 45' and can tell you that I will never do it again! When I left for Redmond last year, my band came un done in my left front tire. The band totally chewed up the inside and it cost me $ 1,100+ for a new tire and labor!

There is no factory support, since they are located in Essex, England. I called them, the bands are designed and made for British Military Off Road Vehicles! Tyron's representative did not recommend the bands be used on personal or recreational vehicles!

I also got mine from Lazy days in Tampa and they will not stand behind them after purchase.

My 2 cents worth!

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We have them installed and just had a blowout on the 4th of July weekend on I-90 outside of Cleveland. My wife was driving and the Tyron did keep the tire on the wheel until she was able to get the motor home off the interstate. When you purchase the Tyron bands you are given the special tools needed to remove the bands when you replace your tires. They worked as advertised and worked well for my wife who had the blowout at 65 MPH.

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John, welcome to the forum.

Don't know what kind off rig your driving. Gas, DP, Class A,C. or B, length or weight. Glad everything worked out for you and hope you had no major damage!

I think anyone who has had Motorhomes in the past and current has had their fair share off blow outs and it's never been a pleasant experience! That said, it's always on my mind when driving and it's the reason to check for proper air pressure daily, before hitting the road! Also, make sure your weight is proper (what you carry) for the rig and tires. How old are your tires? Over 6 years, start looking to get new tires all around.

As for Tyron, I just don't trust them! When mine came apart, on the freeway in Houston, I thought I had a blow out!!! When I could visually check, every tire was fine until I started driving, the noise was unreal and I started thinking on what else it could be....25 miles to Cummins Coach Care in Houston, took over 2 hours because I could not use I-10, any speed over 15-20 mph and the whole coach was shaking and waddling like a goose! My dog went nuts....

Tyron also is very heavy for rims that carry 22.5 tires!

Carl

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I have looked at that video a number of times on various forums. It makes no more sense now than when I first saw it. Probably for the first time ever, I'm going to have to disagree with Brett, assuming he supports Michelin's philosophy of adding power in the event of a blow out. I had a right front blowout in May of this year on a very busy interstate. We were cruising at 60 in the coach pictured here, with the cruise control on, well within the tire's weight limit, it was properly inflated and had not aged out. We had just crossed a small bridge, and the emergency services driver thought we had run over something that caused the catastrophic failure. When the tire failed the steering wheel started vibrating rapidly back and forth with a slight pull to the right. I immediately tapped off the cruise control and, as we slowed, gradually moved to the shoulder. The biggest problem we had was that the shoulder was very narrow, with a 45 degree angle drop off. My Velvac mirrors have three lenses, the bottom is oriented on each respective tire, so I could see exactly how far I needed to get off the hard stand before I started down the embankment. Even getting as far as I could into the grass left us dangerously close the highway. Every 18 wheeler that went by, shook the entire coach. The emergency services driver managed to get the remnants of the old tire off, and the new tire on, without removing the rim.

As I look back on this experience, the last thing I wanted (or needed) was more speed, or thrust, it would have caused more damage and exacerbated the problem. At no time was I in danger of loosing control of the coach or was the vibration or pull to the right severe. Attempting to accelerate or increase thrust never entered my mind. I have been flying helicopters and airplanes for 45 years and have had my share of exciting experiences. Never have I needed more speed..."slow down and put it on the ground" went through my mind as I inched my way off the interstate. And that's what I did.

The Michelin video sounds good and looks good, however, all the scenarios are scripted with safety the primary consideration. It's like a lot of "school solutions," every aspect of the demonstration is planned. However, based on my experience, regardless of the physics, when doing it for real, I doubt it's merit, it just doesn't make sense.

 

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Any commercial supply house that services tire shops with weights and tools will have the bars 2 of them are needed. They will also have BUD sockets which are used to remove the lug nuts and rear studs retaining the rear inside dually. Now you need an air hose and a 3/4 inch impact wrench and a means to access the air on your coach if you have air. I frequently carry a small nitrogen bottle with a regulator. I use it to keep tires pressured up but it is good for one removal and re-installation if needed. Efficiency is the name of the game as the nitrogen quantity is not an unlimited supply if using this set of tools.  

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