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Water Pressure For Hot Water?

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Verify that all faucets are off at the "hot" and "cold" knobs, not just at the water saver shutoff. Wet bay and shower.

It could also be that you have mineral accumulation that is blocking water flow. When is the last time you drained and "vacuumed" or flushed out the minerals in the water heater.

If Atwood, buy the Atwood nylon drain plug-- 2.5 wraps of teflon tape.

If Suburban, buy the anode-- 2.5 wraps of teflon tape.

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Yes, there are flush "wands" you can buy or make.

I have always just bought 5' of thin wall clear (cheap) vinyl hose.

Water heater off long enough that it is COLD. Turn off water pump, disconnect from shore water. Bleed off water pressure (open any faucet). Remove drain plug and immediately stick in the hose pointing DOWN toward the bottom of the water heater. Suck on the other end to start a siphon (remember this is potable water). Move the water heater end around while looking at what you are vacuuming out (clear hose). When nothing more comes out but clear water, you are done.

Most likely if this has not been done in the last year, you will get a full coffee cup of white solid minerals out of it!

If you run out of water and your "vacuum" still has minerals in it, have someone turn on the water pump for one minute to replenish the water in the water heater. Repeat until clean.

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There is (most likely) a check valve in the outlet line of the water heater tank that could be plugged or defective. Also, make sure all bypass (winterizing) valves are completely closed (or open - depending on which valve).

Lenp

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I recently had the same problem. I removed the hot water on/off valve on the sink and found a small piece of plastic partially blocking the water flow. Removed the blockage and reinstalled valve. WaaLaa everything back to normal. :)

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I am having trouble removing the anode. It is not the usual one that you use a 1 1/16 socket to remove. The anode has a female hex key socket that appears to be 1/2 inch. I have looked all over and cannot find any hex key larger that 3/8. Anyone know anything about this type of socket?

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I should have known . After last post, I checked Amazon and found the 1/2 inch hex key adapted for use with sockets. Whole set for $15. Will have it Monday. Thanks anyway for any posts.

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Yes, there are flush "wands" you can buy or make.

I have always just bought 5' of thin wall clear (cheap) vinyl hose.

Water heater off long enough that it is COLD. Turn off water pump, disconnect from shore water. Bleed off water pressure (open any faucet). Remove drain plug and immediately stick in the hose pointing DOWN toward the bottom of the water heater. Suck on the other end to start a siphon (remember this is potable water). Move the water heater end around while looking at what you are vacuuming out (clear hose). When nothing more comes out but clear water, you are done.

Most likely if this has not been done in the last year, you will get a full coffee cup of white solid minerals out of it!

If you run out of water and your "vacuum" still has minerals in it, have someone turn on the water pump for one minute to replenish the water in the water heater. Repeat until clean.

Mr Wolfe could you explain the vacuum process in a little more detail kind of confused on the process, thank you.

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Yes, starting with a full, but depressurized water heater, remove the drain plug. Immediately insert one end of the clear plastic hose into the water heater. Start a siphon, either by sucking on the other end (it is potable water) or just lowering it to the ground.

Once the siphon has started, work the tank end around in the bottom of the tank. With the clear hose, it is easy to see what you are vacuuming up-- usually white chunks of minerals. If this has not been done in awhile, one tank of water may not be enough to remove all of them. If so, have someone turn on pressure water to refill the tank. Basically, you want to continue vacuuming until there is nothing but clear water coming out the hose.

In many cases, were you to put the other end of the hose in a coffee cup, you would fill the coffee cup up with mineral deposits. No different than a home water heater.

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I am having trouble removing the anode. It is not the usual one that you use a 1 1/16 socket to remove. The anode has a female hex key socket that appears to be 1/2 inch. I have looked all over and cannot find any hex key larger that 3/8. Anyone know anything about this type of socket?

If it is 1/2 inch just use the end of a 1/2 inch drive extension from your socket set.

Bill

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Check the "Check Valve". We had the same issue with an 08 Phaeton. The valve is behind the water heater. It is accessed through a small hole in the wall in the basement next to the heater. Very tight squeeze, I had a service person do it. My hot water completely stopped flowing.

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I have good news for those that have Atwood water heater. Camco makes a anode for it that replaces the drain plug. I cleaned out my water heater today and replace the drain plug with the anode plug. Piece of mind.

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If it is 1/2 inch just use the end of a 1/2 inch drive extension from your socket set.

Bill

A 1/2 drive extension is square and four sided and what is needed is a hex and is six sided. Drain plugs on the rear axle has a square hole, my is 1/2 inch.

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Morning Jim,

Even outboard motors and out drives have anode plates on them. Electrolysis will attact and eat away the softest metals even steel and especially aluminum. The anode is zinc and it will be the metal effected by electrolysis. If you pull an anode after a year in a hot water unit you will see it very pitted. That is what happens to metals in water. Stainless will be the least effected while zinc will be the most effected by electrolysis.

The reason most manufacturers don't install them is cost per unit. (I also think it prolongs the life of a unit too much)

Herman

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Actually, if Atwood thought an anode would be a good idea (or even neutral) they would certainly market one. Doubt they would ignore a good additional profit center!

Atwood does NOT recommend an anode and in fact only sells the inexpensive nylon/plastic drain plugs.

If you are considering an anode, please verify the material the threads are made of. I would question the use of steel threads into the aluminum tank threads. Speaking of sacrifice-- suspect the aluminum threads of the tank would give long before the steel threads of the replaceable anode's threads as minerals and electrolysis join them.

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Old plumber trick. At least 2 wraps of Teflon tape followed by pipe dope. Seals good and no corrosion of the threads. A very good reason for installing a anode is when I go for the winter there is mineral water that taste a bit salty. We don't cook or drink it as most people don't. Although I use a filter it doesn't get all the salt or other minerals out. I know that owning a boat in the past that salt in the water will destroy a motor in no time. Brett proves the point for the need as minerals and electrolysis so aluminum or not it gets a anode. Imagine 3 months of salty mineral water with no protection.

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Use a 5/16" bolt which has a 1/2" hex head. Use a bolt about 2" long and jamb a couple of nuts near the threaded end. Insert the head into the plug and remove it. This works for most sizes of either US or metric internal situations.

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I had the same problem with low hot water pressure. Being full-timers, we don't need the winterizing by-pass kit on the heater, which includes a check valve. I took the guts out of the check valve, to remove the restriction, and then got the same pressure on the hot as on the cold.

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