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tcolburn

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About tcolburn

  • Birthday 02/22/1950

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Chicago's South Suburbs

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  1. I live just south of Chicago and I'm looking for a shop within a reasonable distance which will repair my driver's-side window. One of the three panes has condensate in it and the seals are leaking--makes using the rear-view mirror a bit of an adventure in some light conditions! I contacted RV Glass Solutions, which has a shop in Elkhart, Indiana, but they will only do a complete replacement of all the panes with their new double laminated solution--which requires two visits to the shop: one to measure, and the other several weeks later, after the new glass is cut in Oregon and then shipped to Elkhart.! I'm not interested in the time nor the expense. I also contacted Master Tech RV, also in Elkhart. They can do the job I need (removing, cleaning, resealing the window); however, they have only one technician who does this sort of work and he hasn't returned to work from Florida or wherever yet!! I'm awaiting a call back from them when he returns, but... Mobile RV Glass advertises that they have several affiliates who repair thermal windows, but when I contacted those shops directly it turns out they only do windshields, not thermal glass repair. Anybody know of another source in my area? Thanks. --Tim C.
  2. Thanks for the responses. I did what F442485 suggested: logged out and then in again. Now it works! —Tim C.
  3. I discovered that the fmca.com website has now come back online, and I was browsing through the various areas to see what may have changed. When I looked at the Membership Directory, I found that I could see my own entry but no one else's. I tried searching by member number (by the way, before upgrade just the numerical portion was enough but now I had to include the "F" at the beginning); by city and state (but just zip code wouldn't get it); and by name. Only entry I could see was mine. Just wanted to let you all know... Best, Tim C.
  4. On our ‘04 Revolution, there is an in-line fuse in the power lead going to the water pump. It’s just behind the pump, which is behind a removable panel in the wet bay. I’ve blown that fuse twice so now I carry some spares of that type in my toolbox.
  5. tcolburn

    step retraction

    Not sure if I understand the problem correctly. But when we put away our coach in storage, here’s what I do with the steps: after I exit the vehicle, I close the screen door (which retracts the steps), then reach through the door handle opening in the screen door to turn off the house batteries—fortunately the switch is right by the door! Then I open the screen door, attach it to the outer door, and close and lock them both. Steps stay retracted till I return, open the door, and flip the battery switch. Hope this helps somehow. —Tim
  6. Ours has a 10A in-line glass fuse in the power lead right at the pump. (‘04 Fleetwood Revolution) —Tim C.
  7. I had a slight leak in our tank’s fill valve. RV dealers didn’t want to deal with it and recommended I go to a propane supplier. I found Amerigas in Lansing, Illinois. They had to vent all of the gas out of the tank, then replace the valve. In the process they broke the gauge sender and had to replace that too (but didn’t charge for the extra labor). Took a week or two for the whole process due to their other clients. Everything’s been working fine since.... —Tim
  8. Our local Petro will run the card (before fill up) for whatever you estimate your fill up will cost; this places the hold on the account, and when you reach that amount, the pump shuts off. If you don’t reach the preset amount, you are only charged for what you pumped—whether or not you go back in to get an accurate receipt. I, too was skeptical about this when we first got our diesel, but checking my credit card balance verified that it really works this way. By the way, I avoid using a debit card for these kinds of transactions, since I like the ability to dispute a charge with the credit card company in the event something goes sideways.... Like Herman, I usually avoid Love’s because their prices tend to be higher. ...Now it’s time to go out and move some snow here in eastern Will County...😏 —Tim C.
  9. Slide seal lubricant. I think it’s a Camco product; comes in a spray can. I apply some a couple times a season (when I think of it!). I’ve also used it on the door seals of our cars to help prevent the doors from freezing shut in the winter. —Tim C.
  10. Couple of comments. First, deciding “yes” or “no” on the proposal was not so easy—thanks in large part to the thoughtful discussion here on the Forum. There were a lot of considerations we never thought of before seeing them addressed by others. I vacillated a lot and so did my wife and several of our friends. One procedural issue we had was what to do when the two of us did not agree, since we only had one vote for our F#. I imagine others may have had this concern too, and maybe that was part of the low voter turnout. (BTW, DW and I did reach agreement eventually and got our vote sent in...) Second, apropos chapter membership and governance, this whole process illustrates the need to examine the organizational structure to ensure that every member is fairly represented. I don’t think that there has been any intentional effort to exclude non-chapter members, but from many of the comments here, I can see how some would get that impression. There are several possible models for national/chapter structure (I belong to some other organizations that address this in various ways) and FMCA might well want to establish a committee or something to investigate whether some sort of restructuring might better serve all its members. If this happens, I hope that the accumulated wisdom here would be part of the conversation. And I’ll finish with a chapter comment. When we joined FMCA as newbies a few years ago, we didn’t know anything about chapters. Shortly afterward, though, we got an invitation to join a local chapter, and did so. When we attended our first outing, we discovered a whole new group of lifelong friends we hadn’t known we had! Our chapter is most interested in being together and having a good time: no cliques, no politics, just friendship and a welcoming attitude. For us, this is the face of FMCA. Best, Tim C.
  11. Good idea. Didn't think of that while I was under there! --Tim
  12. Success! And thanks to all for your advice and support. As jobs go, this one turned out to be relatively uncomplicated. Was very conscious of all the safety warnings, so I worked slowly and methodically ('course, everything I do these days is slow and methodical!). Gary, your advice to use vise-grips to hold the shaft was spot on--made it very easy to reassemble all the parts. I purchased the entire unit and just used the clamp, diaphragm, and air chamber/spring brake (referred to as a "piggyback kit" in some of the documentation I found) so that I wouldn't have to mess with the slack adjuster and clevis, nor have to measure and cut the new shaft. Nothing else was bent or damaged. Hardest part was getting the air line nipples out of the old unit, but a gentle application of heat finally did the trick. Interestingly, I discovered damage to the diaphragm under the hole in the chamber housing so I was happy to replace it. The whole operation only took three tools (well, four, if you include the torch): 9/16, 3/4, and 7/8 inch wrenches. Luckily I have some GearWrenches--made it a lot easier. But, wow, my muscles still ache from cranking up that caging bolt! Here's how the new one looks. And it works perfectly. --Till next time, Tim C.
  13. Hey, everyone--thank you all for your responses and excellent advice. I've got a new unit on order from Freightliner and should have it in a day or two. I will be back to update the group on my progress. As Kay noted, it's just the chamber housing that's damaged. And I am parked safely in our local storage area, so no emergency. You bet I'll be careful about the spring, too! See you soon. --Tim
  14. Motoring along on I-80 Sunday, we struck a piece of shrapnel (looked like a metal grating of some sort) that was sitting right in the middle of our lane. I thought I straddled it well enough to avoid damage but as we exited the Interstate the rear brake pressure dropped quickly and the alarm came on. Managed to get home carefully and got the coach parked in its storage slot. Upon inspection, I discovered a hole in the left rear air brake chamber! Here's the question: is this part something I can try to replace by myself? I've looked at several YouTube videos and it certainly seems doable: cage the spring, disconnect the air lines, remove the clamp, and then reassemble with a new part... Any words of wisdom? Sure would rather not have to get the coach towed to a shop! --Tim C.
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