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Finally Legal To Drive My Motorhome Licensed In Texas

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Technically, yes. However, I was not (and I have yet to hear of anyone who was) asked how I got the motorhome to the examiners for the road test. Not many of us have neighbors with class A or B licenses. I sensed that they appreciated the fact I was trying to get a license that made me legal.

I'm sure their approach to a CDL would be different than above. I would not worry about driving to the road test. Incidentally, the road test is a breeze and the examiner I had could not have been nicer.

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See my post, #7 above. If you have a drivers license from another state which is valid for driving your motor home in that state, then Texas will take that license, verify that indeed it was valid for driving your motor home, and give you the license (non-commercial Class A or B without any test required. If you already have a Texas drivers license this won't work but when you first move into state and turn in your out-of-state drivers license, this will help you.

And thanks for the compliment above. Don't be too hard on those of us who post. All of us are trying to help you and others as best we can.

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Where does one go to get regular inspection sticker? Both places seemed to only see I was over26, 001 lbs and argued I only get a commercial inspection sticker.

That is just wrong. I get inspected every year at a regular inspection station. They will not do a gas motorhome as the requirements are different than a diesel and they cannot work on it. However, the very first time I pulled into the station to inquire, and I was driving the car, they asked if it was gas or diesel and when I told them diesel they said they would inspect it. Do not know why.

A motorhome is usually exempt from commercial inspection practices. Where are you that this is happening?

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Don has a good point. The dealer should be able to inspect it, OR you should be able to go to any dealer and they will tell you what inspection station(s) to use. I have never heard of any RV needing a CMV inspection. I guess if one was being used for business and was titled commercial it would make a difference. Not sure on that one. That is another item. What does you title or bill of sale say the vehicle is.

I remember once in Rhode Island I had a 1 ton, crew cab, long bed F350 King Ranch and I stopped and got $10 worth of tokens at the ticket booth going into Newport. The toll booth operator said I could not get the tokens because I was over 8000 pounds. Next day I pulled up to the booth and showed her my registration that titled it at 7900 pounds. She was aghast and gave me the tokens. Several days later I booth operator stepped up and stopped me and said I could not use tokens because i was over 8000 pounds. I reached up to the visor, pulled out the same papers and showed them to her. She just shook her head and I passed through. Never had another problem.

I suspect in your case someone has it in their mind at those stations that you are commercial just because you are over 26,000 pounds. I don't think there has been a change in the law regarding RV's for private use. Shop around. Depending on county taxes it should cost you less than $20 to have the RV inspected. Registrations will cost you somewhere in the neighborhood of $350 a year.

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1. What does you title or bill of sale say the vehicle is.

2. I suspect in your case someone has it in their mind at those stations that you are commercial just because you are over 26,000 pounds.

Vehicle is titled as a personal use Recreational Vehicle.

That is exactly how both of those establishments viewed it . If one is over 26,001 pounds then it is viewed as a commercial vehicle which required a DOT inspection. This is correct when talking about needing a non-CDL Class 'A' or 'B' because the DOTs' definition of a Commercial Vehicle is anything over 26,001 pounds.

I will probably use the dealer the 3rd year for our inspection sticker. I am also in the process of studying Chapter 14 of the Texas Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Handbook for my Class 'A'. This is what the DMV office told me was all I needed to study. Hoping they are correct.

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I believe it is classified under "mobile home"criteria.

If so than this applies and I hope it gives you the amunition you need

http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/rsd/vi/inspection/inspectionCriteria.aspx

I'm really not sure if this is the applicable section. I'll keep looking.

I don't understand why everyone else that has a diesel MH only has to get a standard inspection and you have to get a commercial one. Beyond me!

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Hello everyone, I must say logically get the most license you can for safety's sake. So what if it is a Class A CDL? You will learn a lot and possibly save yourself/others from a serious accident. Take a CDL driving course if you have to. I have the Class A but of course not the Haz mat or tanker endorsement. You all must realize that operating your motorhome takes due diligence and a very professional attitude. What is more professional than a Class A CDL? You will feel better about yourself if you get the CDL, I know I do. One question, do you know what each of your axles weigh? Good info for the back roads.

Keep the rubber side down, Mark

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Mark,

One reason that I decided to give up my Class A CDL is because of the cost, and especially if you should get a ticket. I had a motorcycle accident involving only me and my motorcycle. I got a ticket for it. It was $164 back in that time and there was no defered adjudication of defensive driving if you have a CDL. Pay the fine and/or do the time. With a Class A license you have options that include defered adjudication and/or defensive driving. The fine may be the same, but it doesn't go on your record with defered adjudication. At least it didn't 20 years ago - my last time before my CDL.

I agree with you that knowing the CDL manual will make you more aware and is definately a good thing, but getting a CDL just to have a CDL can be costly. (In Texas.)

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Wayne,

Hey, I didn't know that, thanks for the head's up! I'm going to go by their office today and ask them about my options. (The license bureau is about like the IRS, each office has a different answer!) Take care, Mark

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Chapter 15 is in the smaller yellow manual which was given to me at the DPS office. It is by far easier to follow than the revised white version that only goes through chapter 14. The gal at the office who was the only one who understood what a non-CDL class A or B license is gave it to me.

Maybe you can show them this picture and ask for the yellow manual.

I am in Texas also and I am going to take the written test soon. The DPS office in Richmond TX only gave me the Big white handbook and said to study section 14. I guess I better get the yellow one. What is covered in section 15 of the yellow book? thanks

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Well in Ohio we do not need a CDL or Non CDL which I never heard of until this thread. However I do have a CDL class B which I got while driving part time as a school bus driver and have kept it renewed since 15 years ago. So I think that I am covered with my Ohio CDL class B to drive our 38 foot towing a toad in any state. Trust me driving a school bus loaded with middle school kids is allot harder then driving a 38 foot SunVoyager towing a toad!

J79ENG, USAF Ret 89

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This issue comes up quite often in CA. I just retired from the California Highway Patrol after 29 years, the last 10 years as a commercial enforcement Officer. California Vehicle Code section 12804.10(a) states that a House Car (Motorhome) of 40' or less, not including the bumpers can be driven with a class C license. Over 40' requires a noncommercial class B license with a house car endorsement. No where in the law does weight come in to play with motorhomes. Towing a trailer is the same no matter what class of license you have. Under 10,000 lb GVWR trailer any license class is ok. Over 10,000 lb GVWR trailer you need a class A license.

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I'll start by saying I am new to the forum and also a newby motorhome owner. Just bought our first mh in January of this year. It is a used Tiffin Phaeton 36qsh.

Now to the subject of this post. My DW is an assistant manager of the dps driver license in Ft.Worth. And sadly there are quite a few of the DL employees that aren't knowledgeable of the requirements of what is needed for mh license. That is not because they aren't taught this but that it is something that they don't see or have to use regularly. And yes if you don't use it you lose it. These employees are constantly being sent to classes dealing with changes in regulations and requirements, almost daily. It can be quite confusing and difficult to remember something that isn't used very often. And mh requirement are not just simple as it depends on weights and such.

Now I am legal here as to my license. It is a class B exempt. No I didn't have to do the air brake test because it isn't a pure air brake system it is an air over hydraulic system. I had to do the test quickly because of DW job. Now how did I get the mh to the DL office, well I took the written test and got my temp. permit. OK here is the catch these examiners aren't dps troopers most don't ask how you got it there. Now truthfully yes you should have a licensed individual get it there. Enough said there.

Sadly most mh drivers here in Texas don't know that they need a class b exempt if their weight is over 26000 pounds, it takes 26001 pounds to require this. This can also be required of fifth wheels if the combined weight is over 26000 pounds, that's another story that is even a bigger knowledge issue.

All this can get more complicated if you use your mh for business reason or pull a trailer used for business. I've seen individuals ticketed because of a simple sticker on their trailer or mh promoting a business. Same on fifth wheels. Simply put it can be and is complicated.

Good luck out there and remember to be safe and have fun.

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That is why I will never give up my A CDL which I need in Illinois to be legal. If l move to another state I hope I will Have an easy time changing my CDL to that state.

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I just had to upgrade my operators license in NM because of the new coach on order will be over 26,000 lbs, had to change to a class E which is strictly for recreational vehicles over 26,000lbs.

I am sure there are a lot of NM rv owners out there that never change their license and have never been called on it.....

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The word "exempt" is very misleading.

A person in Texas may be exempt from obtaining a CDL if the vehicle is used for personal use. A Form CDL-2 is required only if the vehicle is a commercial vehicle used for personal use. Example: A motorhome that is used by a business to sell tools out of and one member of the family uses it for recreational purposes only. They would need the Form CDL-2 only because that is a commercial vehicle being used for recreational purposes. In any case they would need the appropriate Class A, B or C license and not a CDL license. Now, I wonder how this is all explained when a person is stopped for whatever reason, has a commercial recerational vehcile and only a Class A or B license. Hmmm! Does the word "exempt" appear on his license?

Here is a direct quote from the CDL-2 Form:

"I will operate a commercial motor vehicle that exceeds 26,000 lbs GVWR and requires a Class A or B license that is exempted by the Texas Commercial Driver License Act. The Commercial vehicle that I will operate is defined in the following information. Check the appropriate box(es):

( ) A recreational vehicle that is driven for personal use: or"

That is one of four 6 boxes on the CDLp-2 form. I bolded the part that states "I will operate a commercial vehicle." So a person can operate a commercial recreational vehcile if it is for personal recreational use and not commercial use. The only time that form is needed is if the RV is a commercial vehcile.

So confusing. Must have been drawn up by lawyers. (Hmmm! My son is a lawyer.... Nah, I'm sure he didn't have anything to do with it.)

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Call me confused again, I just looked up who needs what for California and I don't see

anything about "GVWR (lbs.) 27,910" which ours is, it only states under 26,000 and

nothing else.??

Sorry to HJ your thread...

Image1

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Look on the left. No weight, but it says need non commercial B IF you are over 40', and under 45', with endorsement. Not sure what the endorsement is. But, I see no wt for motorhomes, only on trailers.

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If you look at the section basic Class C license. It states any housecar 40' or less. Housecar as defined in CA is motorhome. As I stated in a previous post, CA is one of the few states that you don't have to have a special license to drive a motorhome under 40' regardless of weight.

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