QuiGonJohn

Long-term Parking - Tires On Plastic Or Wood?

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I was told that when you park for more than a couple days, you ought to put something under the tires. Specifically, that it's not good to leave the tires sitting on dirt, grass, asphalt or concrete for weeks or months at a time.

We park our RV beside our house, currently just in the grass. As recommended, once I have the RV positioned, I place plastic levelers, pull forward, put the levelers in place and back up onto the plastic levelers. I usually only leave the RV parked 3-4 weeks, as we have been, and plan to, take it camping about once a month.

My questions are:

Is this true that I need to do this?

Could I park it on rectangular paver stones, which I am thinking of putting where my wheels go? And would this do the same thing or would I still need to put it on plastic or wood, (that was the other option I was told about).

Thanks for the help!

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FIVE   

I have heard the same thing, especially avoid asphalt. Where I park for storage has a concrete floor, I run the tires up on plywood and then put out the jacks to take some weight off of it.

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wolfe10   

I have heard the same thing, especially avoid asphalt. Where I park for storage has a concrete floor, I run the tires up on plywood and then put out the jacks to take some weight off of it.

I do exactly the same-- plywood on concrete. If storing more than a month, per Michelin's recommendation, inflate tires to max on sidewall.

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When any vehicle is in long term storage the tires should be completely off the ground. Radials (especially steel belted ones) tend to take a 'set' over time. When I rotate tires I keep them on the same side for that very reason.

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skyking8   

When any vehicle is in long term storage the tires should be completely off the ground. Radials (especially steel belted ones) tend to take a 'set' over time. When I rotate tires I keep them on the same side for that very reason.

It isn't good to lift your motot home tires completely off the ground. First they then would be hanging on the axles and they are heavy. Secondly, it would negate the braking system.

I use heavy duty fatigue runners under my tires. Comfort mats can also be used. Both are made of heavy duty rubber so it's rubber to rubber contact. An added benefit is that they are flexible and can be rolled up and put into basement storage.

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My two bits worth of understanding is that you want to avoid surfaces that may contain oils or chemicals that could affect the tires. Safe bet is to place a barrier between the tire and surface. I would think good clean concrete pavers would be okay, but if in doubt a piece of clean plywood can’t hurt.

Have always heard that any vehicle in long term storage should be lifted and placed on blocks to take the weight off the tires. Seems if you used the lift jacks to take most of the weight off, that would be a good compromise, but that’s just my idea. Don’t think this is an issues if you drive it once every 2 or 3 months (my idea again). Michelin says to inflate to sidewall pressure while stored and I’m guessing it is to help with the weight on the tire.

Aside from the tire question, parking on grass, may want to consider how much, if any, additional moisture will collect on the underside. Equipment parked outside on grass seems to rust sooner and faster and not everything under a coach is undercoated.

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There used to be a place near Princeton, MN that sold teflon sheets sized to fit under dual and single tires. They also sold sheets sized to be creeper size so you could scoot under a coach fairly easily flat on the ground. They were about 1/8 inch thick and stored flat. I still carry my creepers as they can be used on dirt, grass, mud, etc. They used to advertise in FMCA but apparently are not in business. I have had mine for years. They weren't cheap but will last forever and I wouldn't trade mine for anything. As per my previous post my coach tires are always on these when in storage.

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dmorris   

My solution was to use old plastic mats used to protect the floor from your desk chair. I replace my plastic floor protector/ mats about once a year for my office. I always buy the larger mats so I can cut them in half. I park on a graveled parking lot and the ruff pointed underside of the mats keep the mats from moving around.

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Koliver   

I have some mats on my garage floor to protect the concrete from any oil drips off the cars, etc. These mats are made from chipped up rubber tires and have been there since 1986. I can seen no signs of deterioration of the mats yet. The concrete under the mats looks less worn than the concrete beside them, so they have done their job.

I can't see how parking a rubber tire on anything they are designed to run on could cause any deterioration of the rubber. If there is a scientific explanation for this practice, that would be infinitely better than "Someone told me" and I would pay attention. Until then, I will continue to believe that the rubber will outlast the concrete or asphalt, and use other materials only to more easily achieve a level park.

I do park on concrete most of the time, and I take up the weight by using the leveling jacks, but this is just in case there is a leak of air from one or more of the tires.

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Koliver,

My mindset is similar to yours, so I looked around before I made post #8. Maybe should have included the quotes then, but would have required more effort, :) but since you asked.

Specific to surface a tire sits or rolls on, I found the following in the respective RV tire guides. They also have info on inflation or lifting the weight off.

Michelin: "some storage surfaces can cause tires to age faster"

Bridgestone: "Avoid letting tires sit on asphalt for long periods of time because they can absorb damaging oils from it.

Goodyear: "Thoroughly clean your tires with soap and water before storing them to remove any oils that may have accumulated from the road.”

Okay, so its not a scientific explanation, but should elevate the practice a little above the "somebody told me" status.

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Briarhopper, interesting thought on the grass. I think I will look into pulling the grass and making an area that I can then put down plastic sheeting with gravel over that. Maybe pavers where I expect the tires to be. We've only had it since mid-April and we have been, and plan to, take it out about once a month, 5 to 6 weeks between outings should be the longest time. But I'd like to not have it on the grass. For one thing, we have had tons of rain here and the ground is so soft, the tires have sunk quite a bit into the grass/ground.

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tireman9   

If you look at the statements from the tire mfg they basically do not want "stuff" that can harm the tire to move to the tire and hurt it.

Oil from asphalt or water from dirt/sand. It isn't the grass but the moisture that can migrate into the tire over time from the dirt or sand.

I would think that pavers would be reasonable. Personally I have some 2x10 that are large enough to support the complete footprint that I place over the gravel where I park for the winter.

Inflating the tires to their max is a good idea. If you can remove some of the load that would decrease the rubber "set" that can occur too.

Don't forget the white tire covers to protect against excess heat and UV and no electric motors or devices like ozone generators near the tires or in the same garage if indoors.

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Was going to buy some cutting boards, store didn't have enough. How about vinyl floor mats?

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bobbyks   

My coach is under cover on concrete, I purchased horse mats from Tractor Supply and cut them to desired size.

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jleamont   
On ‎7‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 8:59 AM, bobbyks said:

My coach is under cover on concrete, I purchased horse mats from Tractor Supply and cut them to desired size.

I have the same under ours.

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FIVE   

I keep mine under cover and on plywood, with linoleum under the plywood in case I get water inside from a hard rain.

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MWeiner   
On 5/18/2012 at 4:03 AM, QuiGonJohn said:

I was told that when you park for more than a couple days, you ought to put something under the tires. Specifically, that it's not good to leave the tires sitting on dirt, grass, asphalt or concrete for weeks or months at a time.

We park our RV beside our house, currently just in the grass. As recommended, once I have the RV positioned, I place plastic levelers, pull forward, put the levelers in place and back up onto the plastic levelers. I usually only leave the RV parked 3-4 weeks, as we have been, and plan to, take it camping about once a month.

My questions are:

Is this true that I need to do this?

Could I park it on rectangular paver stones, which I am thinking of putting where my wheels go? And would this do the same thing or would I still need to put it on plastic or wood, (that was the other option I was told about).

Thanks for the help!

Big difference between more than a "few days" to months at a time... 

I try to take my rig out at least once a week to exercise it.. parking on concrete driveway should not be a problem...mine is right in front of my house.

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Rain should not hurt the tires, after all we ride in rain.

However, even in storage a neighbor could have a transmission leak, oil leak, antifreeze leak and it could float and puddle under 'your' tires. Best to put them up on something.

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FIVE   
23 hours ago, MWeiner said:

 

...I try to take my rig out at least once a week to exercise it.. parking on concrete driveway should not be a problem...mine is right in front of my house....

By "exercising it" if you mean taking it out and running it long and hard enough to get all systems up to normal operating temperature, the experts say that's fine, other wise leave it parked.  Those same experts say to put something between rubber tires and concrete....rubber mats, plywood, etc.

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garyreed   

Just curious, What are the benefits of elavating the tires on rubber or wood?

Gary

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2 hours ago, garyreed said:

Just curious, What are the benefits of elavating the tires on rubber or wood?

Gary

It protects the tires from contact with the concrete or asphalt. The thought is the chemicals and moisture can damage the tire.

Bill

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