bburns8

How Do MH Engine Batteries Receive Their Charge?

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The cable you now have is 1/0 sometimes referred to as "One  Ought" Your best bet would be to purchase the cable from a Welding Supply House if you are planning on making them yourself.  A hardware store is a good place to find the lugs. You will need  1/0 X 5/16 copper lugs for your house batteries since they have threaded post.

Herman

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wolfe10   

You can also purchase  "properly large-gauge" pre-made interconnects from any marine dealer.  Yes, more expensive, but the pre-tinned (marine grade) wire is MUCH more resistant to corrosion than raw copper.

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I just went thru this exercise using 2/0 wire, regular welding cable. I used closed ended lugs and adhesive laden shrink tube. Before assembly and crimping I used dialectic grease in the lugs. Then they were crimped with a crimping tool, not a hammer like I have seen used before. Then the adhesive laden shrink tube was used, red for positive and black for negative.  I did this on the previous coach and no corrosion issues in seven years. Dialectic grease was used on all battery connections during assembly. Amazon is an excellent source for the heavy wire and reasonably priced. 

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On 12/6/2017 at 11:07 AM, bburns8 said:

  Only appliance turned on was the refrigerator in AC mode.

Unplugged from Shore power

Voltage at chassis batteries tested in series:  12.82v
Voltage at house banks batteries tested in series:   12.04v

 

I am wondering about this.  If the fridge is in AC mode and he is unplugged from Shore-power,  is the inverter creating that 120 volts to power the fridge?  The AC heaters for an absorption fridge use a lot of amps. 

Could that explain the voltage drop on the house battery's?  

I reread thru the thread and couldn't find any info on his fridge.  

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wolfe10   

Good question.

It would be extremely unusual for the refrigerator 120 VAC outlet to be off the inverter-- would really negate the purpose of having an absorption refrigerator.

But, super easy to check. 

Unplug from shore power, generator off, inverter off:

Either plug voltmeter or any 120 VAC device (hair dryer works well) into the outlet behind the refrigerator that the refrigerator is normally plugged into.  Better be no power there.

 

Now, turn on inverter and repeat test.  Very likely it will still be "no power".  If there is power,  look for another place to plug in.  I have even seen the two outlet plugs behind the refrigerator with one powered by shore only and the other by inverter.  Generally the inverter outlet is for an ice maker.

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