Chunkybeastracin@aol.com

Pet Discrimination

43 posts in this topic

A friend of mine moved into a mobile home park in october 07. In January of 07 a rule was passed that no dogs over 40 pounds are to reside in the park. However, they let him move in with a 75 pound dog which is very well mannered 1/2 golden/1/2 Australian Shepherd. He is their sons dog and once their son moved to the country he took him. They were wanting another puppy and was blessed with a 6 week Golden Retriever. Now the landlord is saying they can't keep him because he will be over 40 pounds. A Doberman, Grey Hound, Chocolate Lab and other over 40 pound dogs reside there and they say its because their Grandfathered in. Now my friend is facing eviction if he does not get rid of our puppy. Isn't this a discrimination situation too?

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Has anyone seen Bouvier de Flandres on a list banned breeds?

Dave,

Not sure about this breed. Each RV park may have different standards (and that may be dictated by their insurance). Best thing to do is ask when you contact a park. We have noticed some parks have weight restrictions - we have seen some restricted to less than 40 pounds and one less than 20 pounds.

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Leary. LOL, that is one "BIG" dog! I have never been asked about that one....I had a 42# mixed breed for 15+ years and put her down last July...if I was not 73, I would love to have a Flanders or it could have me! If I remember, avg. female 120#, avg. male 140#! Great temperament around pretty near everyone and everything! :wub:

Carl

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I have a well-trained Boxer. Outside the home he is always on leash.

He is six months, been trained since two months, using Leerburg methodology.

Recently at Yosemite he was very well behaved around the other hikers and dogs.

The other hikers and dogs were often not well behaved around my Boxer.

The key to training is knowing their temperament and how they respond when their prey drive kicks in.

One must also understand alpha and group behaviors.

Few owners understand that when the dog prey drive kicks in, mostly outside the home, they

won't have the same control over their dog.

Also the dog and owner needs to be trained for off-leash high distraction situations.

Imo this accounts for many of the traveling problems.

A Boxer, such as mine, is a working dog and when he goes into prey drive he is a lot to contend with.

Fortunately, his training progresses towards off-leash high distraction situations.

It is also my responsibility to protect him from other dogs. I do not rely on other owners to control their dogs.

I take full responsibility for his interactions and assume nothing about other dogs or owners.

Imo the private parks are well justified for implementing breed restrictions.

An owner's representations are not enough.

It is well known across forums that not all places where one might want to park will allow certain breeds. It is also well known that not all the hiking trails I go on allow dogs. Just like the Class A parks and the cities that don't want MH owners parking near home owners.

All those restrictions/discriminations are fine with me. Plenty to do elsewhere. Yosemite is a great dog friendly national park.

Note: I'm always on call and ready to protect my dog if attacked by another dog. I have two levels of protection. So far, around my neighborhood I have been able to control other dogs just by my alpha control presence and commands. Some day that will fail and then I will use either one of two protective devices.

Last night a pit bull came flying out of his house towards me. I stopped him in his tracks about two yards away from me. I was ready for him, the pit was not ready for me. If he had come forward, I would have put him down.

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Note: there are something like 12 to 15 different dog aggressive behaviors. All dogs exhibit one or more of them. Some of the worse bites come from small dogs. Small dogs are often the least trained dogs out there.

I worry more about small dogs than large dogs, because of the owners, not because of the dogs.

All the concerns about discriminations and the limitations in place have much more to do with the owners.

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On 3/27/2015 at 5:53 AM, manholt said:

".........According to my Vet. dogs don't hear dogs bark......?      Are you sure of that??   JM2¢

 

IMG_4280.JPG

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Old thread, but hey! How come when the dog down the alley about 2 houses down barks my dog turns it head and looks in that direction and when the neighbor's dog barks behind the fence between our yards my dog picks it's head up and looks in that direction?

Oh, my dog will not return the bark. (75 lb Husky.)

I think they hear other dogs bark very well.

Dogs bark - in slow motion

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Wow!  Can't believe that it's been 16 months since we heard from Rodger S. :lol:

The only thing I have heard, is that Dogs can't hear themselves bark! B)  So they don't know why or what they are being punished for...:(  

Edited by manholt
incomplete sentence

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13 hours ago, wayne77590 said:

Old thread, but hey! How come when the dog down the alley about 2 houses down barks my dog turns it head and looks in that direction and when the neighbor's dog barks behind the fence between our yards my dog picks it's head up and looks in that direction?

Oh, my dog will not return the bark. (75 lb Husky.)

I think they hear other dogs bark very well.

Dogs bark - in slow motion

Back to dog restrictions.  Can I just vent here!  My son just moved out and got an apartment on his own.  At the time he signed his lease, they told him about additional charges for pets, and he mentioned he might get a dog in the future.  No mention of restricted breeds at that time.

He just got himself a husky puppy, and now they mention that there are several breeds that are not allowed, including husky!  Grrrr.

It was suggested that if a doctor could sign s note saying the dog is a "companion dog", then he would be allowed.  I know this is overused (people with pets on airplanes come to mind), but this might help out the OP, if they are still reading this thread.

Chris G.

F3508s

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3 hours ago, aztec7fan said:

Back to dog restrictions.  Can I just vent here!  My son just moved out and got an apartment on his own.  At the time he signed his lease, they told him about additional charges for pets, and he mentioned he might get a dog in the future.  No mention of restricted breeds at that time.

He just got himself a husky puppy, and now they mention that there are several breeds that are not allowed, including husky!  Grrrr.

It was suggested that if a doctor could sign s note saying the dog is a "companion dog", then he would be allowed.  I know this is overused (people with pets on airplanes come to mind), but this might help out the OP, if they are still reading this thread.

Chris G.

F3508s

Please don't suggest abuse of the Emotional Support animal provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act, or even worse, the Service Animal provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act!

Just because he is having problems with his management company or Board of Directors doesn't justify making it harder for those of us who actually DO require these animals for our medical or psychological conditions -- including many vets!

Some states are actually considering legislation to make such false claims a misdemeanor offense; I support that wholeheartedly!

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It's a shame they have a restriction on a Husky. I wonder why, as they are a gentle dog and not aggressive to people.  Of course all dogs should be kept on a leash.  Why, because when unleashed dogs approach another dog instinct takes over and protective order prevails.

The Husky is a decedent of the Spritz dog.  Many think it is the wolf.  All dogs can have an admixture of a wolf family but that was 12,000 or so years ago.

Pit Bulls are also a breed that is not allowed in CG's. We have friends that have a Pit Bull as a service animal, she a disable veteran and he PTSD from an accident.  The Pit Bull is certified by the VA as being a dual service animal. That dog is as gentle as a small bunny rabbit. It's all in the training.

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I have found that a small dogs is more aggressive than large ones, and most owners of small ones, just laugh it off !  Go figure.

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I never blame the dog for poor behavior. I blame the dog's owner. The dog wasn't taught better.

I also have noticed that how a dog behaves provides very good clues as to its owner's conduct, behavior, and attitude. I think landlords and other property managers use the person looking to bring in a "big" dog as their judgement call as to whether there will be problems.

I have also observed people with very poor habits and the way they come across almost always have poorly behaved pets and/or children.

A dog who has always lived in its home and yard and protected it has no idea of how to behave in a CG. Then the misbehavior starts, unless good training has been done beforehand.

We have owned 11 dogs and 11 cats over the years and every one of our dogs were socially adapted and well mannered. (7 were German shepherds)

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Well said. :)

We have a 16 year old Rat Terrier and a 14 year old Lab mix, the Lab was a rescue dog and now has come to accept people and most other dogs...Linda trained it for 3 years and I for a year now.  I have never said a loud word to her, she was beaten and miss treated by a man, so it took her a year to get used to me! :wub:

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7 hours ago, nitehawk said:

I never blame the dog for poor behavior. I blame the dog's owner. The dog wasn't taught better.

I also have noticed that how a dog behaves provides very good clues as to its owner's conduct, behavior, and attitude. I think landlords and other property managers use the person looking to bring in a "big" dog as their judgement call as to whether there will be problems.

I have also observed people with very poor habits and the way they come across almost always have poorly behaved pets and/or children.

A dog who has always lived in its home and yard and protected it has no idea of how to behave in a CG. Then the misbehavior starts, unless good training has been done beforehand.

We have owned 11 dogs and 11 cats over the years and every one of our dogs were socially adapted and well mannered. (7 were German shepherds)

We had our Husky professionally trained. Plus I keep up at the training. Part of the professional training was socialization. It worked until she was 18 months old. Until 18 months old she would walk up to any dog sniff butts while circling and play. Then at 18 months old she was attacked and no less by a Chihuahua not on a leash in a campground. My dog is always leashed. I had to kick at the Chihuahua to keep it away from my dog until the owner came and got it. They were all sitting outside. Over the past several years my dog has been attacked 9 times by various breed dogs whose owners don't think they need to keep their dog on a leash.  So now it is the thinking of the professionals that my dog has "fear aggression."  It only manifests itself when other dogs start approaching her.

Walking in CG's or anywhere my dog can walk by my side (always on a leash) in heel mode and just glance at any dog that is 5-6 feet away with not show of aggression.  If you were near me with your dog I could ask my dog to lay down and your dog could be within 5 feet and my dog would ignore your dog unless it started to come near here.

I don't believe your statement of a dog who has lived in a home/yard all its life does not have an idea how to behave.  Just doesn't ring true with our Husky.

p.s., forgot to say: If my dog is attacked by another dog, especially one of those little yappers and I just let her have her way, which one is the aggressor? Our Husky is 75-80 pounds given the week or day and one of those little Chihuahua's would be a toss toy for her.

I could hear the rumblings now, "That big mean dog bit up and spit out that little dog, what a mean dog."

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Wayne.  You got my Vote!  I hear that kind of talk in campgrounds all the time...poor little doggie!  At the last CG before getting home 10 days ago, I went and told all the owners of small and medium dogs, who was not on a leash that if they came around our dog and got chewed up, I would sue them...I explained to them, that in Texas we have a State leash law and my dog would suffer a guilt trip, anxiety and confusion, because she was not allowed to roam free, but your dogs are!  We where at the KOA in Mount Pleasant, TX.!

They all got the hint or maybe they figured that I was nuts enough to do it.

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I hope they don't forget the lesson at the next camp ground.

To all those who "know" there little angel will never attack.  Well, you just don't know what a dogs behavior is going to be when it finally gets next to another dog. One false growl or bad eye contact can send dogs into a frenzy.

On Mother's day DW was walking our dog around the block.  On a sidewalk next to an open lot an unleashed Pit Bull came charging at our dog and grabbed her by the neck.  DW grabbed the collars of both dogs and finally the Pit Bull let go. This caused DW to fall and in doing so broke a couple ribs.  A passer by took the Pit Bull which was not aggressive to humans and tied it to his bumper until animal control could get there. DW had called me and I was on scene in about 1 minute. Police were at the scene. I stated that had I been with her I would have put a bullet into the Pit Bull and he said i could have done that but to watch out for ricochets.  Yep! Know about them ricochets.

Texas law. All dogs need to be fenced, tethered, or on a leash.

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