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How Old Is To Old To Keep A Rig


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#1 gcwp75

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:23 AM

Just thought I could get some opinions as to how long one could keep a class a diesel?


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#2 wolfe10

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:41 AM

Off the top of my head, I can think of four primary factors:

 

Initial build quality.

 

The "care and feeding"/maintenance it has had through its life.

 

One's interest and ability to do routine maintenance and smaller repairs ones self.

 

One's "need" for new/newer.


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#3 DickandLois

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:49 AM

After reading Brett's thoughts.

We all look at items from different perspectives.

 

The current coach we have is almost 14 years old and is in good mechanical condition in regards to the Chassis. So it is not a concern at the time. Being and older Diesel it does not have any EPA required added system, that do add necessary maintenance and the cost associated with them.

 

Diesel engine has a good 400,000 miles left on her bearing any major issues that could pop up. Granted the warranty period is up, but being a relative simple chassis there is really little to worry about. Now! in regards to parts being No Longer Available. That can be an issue, but most parts are available although most are reman. and not an off the shelf item is some cases.

 

The coach section is basic, some might consider it crud or primitive. However it is sound with just a touch of delamination. When I inquired about it, the repair center just brushed if off. Noted, the 8in. by 3in. wide spot is not worth the cost and asked how long it had been there. I said like 4 years due to a small seam leak that was repaired. 

 

All the systems and equipment work fine and I can do most of the work (yet) and have the upper hand regarding how to operate, locate parts and access items. The thought of going through the required learning curve on a new or newer coach is not appealing to me at this time.

I prefer to put the money into fuel and expendable parts and run over more white lines.

 

Always weigh the investment in a newer unit to the current cost of keeping the present one the road. When the two cross, one needs to evaluate there options and needs.

 

Rich.


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#4 ticat900

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 12:10 PM

Personally I think the build technology gets pretty stale after 10 years and things are mighty worn or worn out in general.
 

It depends on if used full time or part time.

 

Mileage is not usually an issue it seems.

 

Anyhow my opinion to answer the OP question is 10 years max.


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#5 hermanmullins

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 03:30 PM

To me it all depends on the quality of your current coach and what you can afford. Ours is 11 years and counting. At my age I hope it keeps up with us,

 

Herman


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#6 Kvachereau

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:36 PM

Age is just a number! If it ain't broke...

Ken Vachereau
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#7 Allegiance40x

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 01:28 PM

I would add to Brett's post the same comments, only how they pertain to the driver/owner and add his/her overall health, physical condition and ability. :D


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#8 jharden2

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 08:06 AM

I ask this question of myself. We have a 13 year old Monaco Dynasty. 

 

Parts for the chassis are available. The convect microwave quit last winter, so I ordered a new one. Quasar tube TV got ugly. Got a Trav'ler put it on and put in a 32" HD flatscreen. Radio quit, put in a new Sony so all the plugs work. An '05-'07 MH is going to cost ~$50k to upgrade to. The only other MH I would consider is Tradition '12 or later and they are a couple of $100k more. Needing more room might drive this, but MH age probably will not.

 

I read in a newspaper a financial advisor recommending this, when the cost of repair approaches half the cost of new, it's time to replace. In my instance, I would have to carry a mortgage of about $1000-1200 a month to buy a MH to replace this one. So if the cost of repair approaches $500-600 per month on an annual basis then it is time to move. That is $6k-7k in a year.

 

IMHO


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#9 ticat900

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 10:57 PM

I would never ever even consider nor would recommend any one ever have a mortgage/loan  on a motorhome if their either retired and or retired and living full time in the MH. If your retired and need a mortgage/loan to own a motorhome then you should not be retired.


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#10 turtlemechanic

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 07:11 AM

I would have no issues with a 50+ year old bus, as long as you know the systems or have a big pocket book :D

.

.

It's like a 100 year old house, they are either a money pit or a fun project, maintenance makes a big difference


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#11 HenryPatterson

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 10:50 AM

I agree with ticat900...no mortgage of any kind if your retired...Go with what you can afford.


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#12 DSWHIMS

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 05:05 PM

After getting rid of an 89 Southwind motorhome 6 years ago, I just purchased a 95 Safari Trek. And I was wondering the same thing did I buy a money pit. This Rig had only 45000 miles on a GM 7.4 Diesel. I liked it because the amount of fiberglass is minimal. However I am planning to take a long trip and am a little worried, even though I have had it gone over. any thoughts.


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#13 wolfe10

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 05:29 PM

DSWHIMS,

 

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

 

Suspect you have the 6.5 liter Chevy diesel-- not aware of any 7.4 diesel.  Not one of the more respected engines/chassis.


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#14 DSWHIMS

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 05:43 PM

I stand corrected it is a 6.5. Can you elaborate on your comments.


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#15 srballard

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 05:48 PM

As far as age, unless you are having problems and it is costing you more than you feel manageable age in and of itself is not really a factor.  Most people trade not so much to maintenance cost but because they want something newer and with maybe more whistles and bells. All come with a new cost factor.  The real question is what you can afford and feel the cost vs. the enjoyment is.

 

Now as to the comments on not financing a motorhome or no mortgage, as a financial anaylist retired, I must disagree. Why would you want to lay out several hundred thousand dollars on an asset that has not chance of appreciation. Even though you might have a mortgage cost you also have the reality of the asset liquidation in the event of your demise. That may ultimately be passed to the mortgagor in that event. All depends on your estate status.  This too is contingent on your financial position but many if not most cannot afford a multi-thousand dollar outlay. 


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#16 jlandon13399

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 05:57 PM

I have to agree with srballard.  If you can earn 8% or more on your money and can borrow at 3.75% it is a no brainer.  Motorhomes depreciate so put your hard earned dollars to work for you not against you.  BTW I am not a financial analyst but have a darn good one!!     :rolleyes:  


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#17 wolfe10

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 06:17 PM

I stand corrected it is a 6.5. Can you elaborate on your comments.

 

The 6.5 was a Chevy engine, not in the same league with Cummins, Caterpillar, etc.  No, this is not a "Ford vs Chevy" thing-- it is just not as robust. I was General Manger of a Chevrolet dealer when the 6.5 was introduced. The later 6.5's (from 1998 as I recall) were a little better.

 

Most have found moving the engine computer from the "valley" to out in front where it gets more air flow.  Plenty of info on the Safari Trek forum.

 

Be sure to keep the front end up to par-- air bags are an integral part of the suspension (unless front springs have been upgraded-- Henderson, etc).  Ball joints should  be checked as well.

 

The "auto park" feature has  been problematic through the years.  Make sure to keep it maintained (including fluid level), as failures can be quite expensive.

 

Brett


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#18 ticat900

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 06:20 PM

Where in the US can you earn 8% after income tax with no risk/?? You may be able to get 8% before tax but what about risk factor. Its not like your 40 here (what were discussing) never borrow money against a depreciating asset if your not working unless you have millions in offshore accounts.


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#19 ticat900

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 06:21 PM

The 6.5 GM turbo diesel was a disaster.


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