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I guess I'm just an old geezer when it comes to all this techie stuff but I just found out about VPN (virtual private network) and am interested in the security aspect of it.

We all know how unsecure campground wifi is (whenever it works) so I'm interested in this. We never us camp wifi to do any banking or anything but use our Verizon jetpack for that. The VPN is a secure network that prevents cyber attacks and hackers from stealing your stuff.

Just wondering if anybody else is using it out there and maybe some pro's and cons if any.

Thanks

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Even campground WiFi is totally secure if you are using an HTTPS (S is the critical part) connection.  So I do banking any most anything else using campground WiFi.  You just want to make sure you don't enter any personal information on any standard HTTP website.

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TBUTLER   

If you have the cellular (Verizon) service available, I'd use that.  If the only thing available is the campground WiFi, I've used it.  Years ago, it was often the only option.  When you are on the WiFi, you are an unexpected target. Unless someone is constantly looking for an easy target, it is unlikely that anyone will find you and intercept your signal.  I figured if I was on and then off again quickly, no one would catch it.  I also don't leave my computer on-line when I'm not using it so it.  If I'm not in a campground for a long time, it would be hard to catch me.  I've been at this for seventeen years now and never had a problem.

Check to see what documents are in your shared document folder.  I once had neighbors who had a shared document folder with a file that had all their passwords.  I periodically check my shared document folder and noticed that there was an unknown folder there.  There was enough information there to let me know who it was.  I knocked on their door and told them what was happening.  They had no idea.  They were sharing the folder between themselves and had no idea that meant anyone had access to it.  You don't have to be on-line to expose that folder. 

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11 hours ago, BillAdams said:

Even campground WiFi is totally secure if you are using an HTTPS (S is the critical part) connection.  So I do banking any most anything else using campground WiFi.  You just want to make sure you don't enter any personal information on any standard HTTP website.

Not familiar with that term at all.

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7 hours ago, TBUTLER said:

If you have the cellular (Verizon) service available, I'd use that.  If the only thing available is the campground WiFi, I've used it.  Years ago, it was often the only option.  When you are on the WiFi, you are an unexpected target. Unless someone is constantly looking for an easy target, it is unlikely that anyone will find you and intercept your signal.  I figured if I was on and then off again quickly, no one would catch it.  I also don't leave my computer on-line when I'm not using it so it.  If I'm not in a campground for a long time, it would be hard to catch me.  I've been at this for seventeen years now and never had a problem.

Check to see what documents are in your shared document folder.  I once had neighbors who had a shared document folder with a file that had all their passwords.  I periodically check my shared document folder and noticed that there was an unknown folder there.  There was enough information there to let me know who it was.  I knocked on their door and told them what was happening.  They had no idea.  They were sharing the folder between themselves and had no idea that meant anyone had access to it.  You don't have to be on-line to expose that folder. 

OK, thanks

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2 hours ago, punxsyjumper said:

Not familiar with that term at all.

Please don't take offense by this, but if you don't know what HTTP and HTTPS is you might be a bit over your head if you have plans to setup a VPN.

Every time you go on the internet you will be visiting a site whose address begins with http://www. or https://www.  The S at the end (https) means that you are connected to a secure site like your bank and everything that takes place after that site opens is completely secure.  You don't need a VPN or any other form of security.  If you go to a known site and it's an HTTPS site (you will also usually see a locked padlock icon vs the unlocked padlock icon) then you can feel comfortable make any necessary transactions.  As an example, the reason you can feel safe while shopping at Amazon is the HTTPS address and look for the padlock to the left when you visit.  https://www.amazon.com/

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The S at the end of http means that the server which you are attached to in the "cloud", internet, has established an encrypted protocol with your computer, only your computer and the server that you are in contact can understand each other. The server sends data to your computer in a manner so that the encryption actually changes at least twice per second to insure that a hacker cannot stumble onto the encryption scheme that is being used at any particular time. Sorry that this probably over some heads, but as Bill A said, it works well. Your cell phone is not as secure as your https: protocol, and think of how often you give out personal info on your phone.

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5 hours ago, BillAdams said:

Please don't take offense by this, but if you don't know what HTTP and HTTPS is you might be a bit over your head if you have plans to setup a VPN.

Every time you go on the internet you will be visiting a site whose address begins with http://www. or https://www.  The S at the end (https) means that you are connected to a secure site like your bank and everything that takes place after that site opens is completely secure.  You don't need a VPN or any other form of security.  If you go to a known site and it's an HTTPS site (you will also usually see a locked padlock icon vs the unlocked padlock icon) then you can feel comfortable make any necessary transactions.  As an example, the reason you can feel safe while shopping at Amazon is the HTTPS address and look for the padlock to the left when you visit.  https://www.amazon.com/

OK, so the S stands for secure. I got it. Thanks

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4 hours ago, kaypsmith said:

The S at the end of http means that the server which you are attached to in the "cloud", internet, has established an encrypted protocol with your computer, only your computer and the server that you are in contact can understand each other. The server sends data to your computer in a manner so that the encryption actually changes at least twice per second to insure that a hacker cannot stumble onto the encryption scheme that is being used at any particular time. Sorry that this probably over some heads, but as Bill A said, it works well. Your cell phone is not as secure as your https: protocol, and think of how often you give out personal info on your phone.

Just needed it explained to me. Thanks

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Just keep in mind that the S is only meaningful if you have a valid relationship with this company.  If you follow some random link to an unknown site with an HTTPS address is just means that the theft that is about to take place will be complete secure and between you and the thief only!  :D

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The most insecure thing that you can do to a computer, is to allow "TOOLBARS" to reside on your computer. The toolbars take you to other sites that monitors everything that you do in most cases, gives you all those unwanted ads and several of them on your computer will slow your computer to a crawl. I go to programs and features, located in the control panel, daily and look for toolbars and uninstall any that reside there. There many places that we visit that will install them unwantedly by just having you click to see something, then those disgusting critters are installed. I don't even allow Google toolbar.

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10 hours ago, kaypsmith said:

The most insecure thing that you can do to a computer, is to allow "TOOLBARS" to reside on your computer. The toolbars take you to other sites that monitors everything that you do in most cases, gives you all those unwanted ads and several of them on your computer will slow your computer to a crawl. I go to programs and features, located in the control panel, daily and look for toolbars and uninstall any that reside there. There many places that we visit that will install them unwantedly by just having you click to see something, then those disgusting critters are installed. I don't even allow Google toolbar.

I'm running linux. Thanks for the info

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Try Adblock Plus and Ghostery.

With Linux you can set parameters using etc/hosts file to keep known bad sites out, it's the unknown that can sneak up on you.

 

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7 hours ago, wayne77590 said:

Try Adblock Plus and Ghostery.

With Linux you can set parameters using etc/hosts file to keep known bad sites out, it's the unknown that can sneak up on you.

 

Exactly

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