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Texas Drivers License


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#1 tmoning

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:01 AM

Motorhomes used for personal pleasure in Texas may require a Class B or Class A license depending on their weight ratings.

After reading the article about Texas Drivers License Requirements, FMCA member Gary Kuba contacted FMCA about the renewal of a Texas noncommercial Class B driver license. This license is required for motorhomes with GVWRs of 26,001 pounds or more. (A Class A license is required if the towed vehicle exceeds 10,000 pounds.)

Mr. Kuba states:

"Any driver renewing the noncommercial Class B license is required to renew at a Texas driver's license location in Texas. You are not able to renew this license via phone or Internet. This is especially critical for people such as Escapees members who may not physically reside in the state, but hold a Texas Class B license. Finding this out at the last minute cost me a $500 flight to Dallas (city with the lowest fare) in order to sign my name and have my picture taken. You will need to plan ahead, so this doesn't happen to you."

But according to the Texas Department of Public Safety Web site, Texas does allow mail-in renewal of Class A and Class B noncommercial licenses, even if you are not domiciled in Texas. Please see this Texas Department of Public Safety Web page:

http://www.txdps.sta...taryrenewal.htm

Several other FMCA members from Texas whose motorhomes exceed 26,000 pounds contacted FMCA with questions about the Class B license requirements.

At least one FMCA member indicated that he received inconsistent information from DPS branch offices regarding the license class and requirements. And some Texas residents said they hold out-of-state licenses from states that do not require the special noncommercial license.

Texas-lilcensed drivers of personal-use motorhomes that weigh more than 26,000 pounds are exempt from holding the Commercial Driver License. BUT, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety, they must hold the Class B or Class A.

Below is an excerpt from the Texas Drivers Handbook, page 7, that addresses the classes of Texas driver licenses. Similar information is in the Texas Transportation Code, starting under Sec. 521.081.

For more information about Texas driver licensing, visit the Texas Department of Public Safety's Web site, www.txdps.state.tx.us.

CLASSIFIED DRIVER LICENSE (Texas Transportation Code, Section 521)

The following listed Class A, B, C, and M licenses will be issued to persons who are exempt from obtaining a Commercial Driver License or persons who are not required to obtain a Commercial Driver License:

1. Class A driver license permits a person to drive any vehicle or combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, provided the gross vehicle weight rating of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds; including a vehicle included in Class B or Class C, except a motorcycle or moped.

2. Class B driver license permits a person to drive the following vehicles, except a motorcycle or moped:

a. a single unit vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, and any such vehicle towing either a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating that does not exceed 10,000 pounds, or a farm trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating that does not exceed 20,000 pounds;
b. a bus with a seating capacity of 24 passengers or more, including the driver; and
c. a vehicle included in Class C.

3. Class C driver license permits a person to drive the following vehicles, except a motorcycle or moped:

a. a single unit vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that is not a Class A or B; and
b. a single unit vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 26,001 pounds, towing a trailer not to exceed 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating or a farm trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating that does not exceed 20,000 pounds.
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#2 skyking8

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 12:36 PM

Mr. Kuba states:
"Any driver renewing the noncommercial Class B license is required to renew at a Texas driver's license location in Texas. You are not able to renew this license via phone or Internet. This is especially critical for people such as Escapees members who may not physically reside in the state, but hold a Texas Class B license. Finding this out at the last minute cost me a $500 flight to Dallas (city with the lowest fare) in order to sign my name and have my picture taken. You will need to plan ahead, so this doesn't happen to you."

According to the code, the fine for not having a TX Class B license is $200. Obviously, cheaper than a $500 airline ticket. It is also worth noting that if "out-of-staters"are going to register their vehicle in TX an inspection sticker is required. You cannot have a TX license plate and out of state inspection. Meaning that you have to bring the rig to TX to get it inspected. Another expense. I am not an attorney, but I'd suggest that the issue of needing a Class B for driving a motorhome is not required. This section indicates to me that a Class B is a form of a CDL. Sec. 522.041: Classifications - The department may issue a Class A, Class B, or Class C commercial driver's license. If that is a true statement then the following excerpt from the code SPECIFICALLY exempts owners of motor homes from needing a Class B license: Sec. 522.004. CDL Applicability. This chapter does not apply to: (4) a recreational vehicle that is driven for personal use; In this section, "recreational vehicle" means a motor vehicle primarily designed as temporary living quarters for recreational camping or travel use. The term includes a travel trailer, camping trailer, truck camper, and motor home. I too have gotten differing responses on this issue from those within the Texas DPS system that should know the correct answer. Considering that and the language of the statues, I suspect it wouldn't be difficult if, I ever got one, to defend a ticket for not having the Class B.
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#3 Leith

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 03:16 PM

Your post regarding the requirement for a Texas Non Commercial Class B license for a vehicle with a GVWR over 26001# sure seems clear and certainly is as detailed in the attached Texas driving handbook requirements in your post for a vehicle with a GVWR over 26001#.

My wife and I were made aware of this Texas license requirement at a Fleetwood Discovery MH owners club meeting and on their DOAI web site forum. Our experiences regarding this are in an article in the latest FMCA magazine. I'm surprised at the reluctance for some to accept this license requirement as the law. I recently found out that it's been the law since 1999 in Texas. A good friend of ours was rear ended by a college student in San Marcus , TX in their Discovery DP MH and the officers first request was to see his Class B license even though he was completely not at fault for the incident. I've also heard at a FCRV rally that some insurance companies may deny coverage to us if we do not have the proper license to be operating our MH's. If you think that insurance companies may not do this just ask some of our friends along the path of recent hurricanes regarding what their insurance companies do regarding crossing the "T's" and dotting the "I's"when the loss is significant. I'm also aware thet you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. Please check fellow FMCA members before the need.


Warren Leith F403214
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#4 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 09:16 PM

Ah! This topic is ever so controversial.

Up until a few weeks ago I had a Texas Class A Commercial Driver's License (CDL). (I no longer need the CDL as I am not driving commercially anymore - It cost more, and if you get a ticket you pay the fine and cannot take Driver Ed or deferred adjudication)

There are two sections of the Texas Code that apply to driver's licenses. Section 521, and section 522.

Section 521 pertains to "regular" class "A," "B," and "C." Also, pay close attention to the restrictions that can be imposed in this section against these classes of licenses. They are very different than the CDL license

Section 522 pertains to "Commercial Driver's License" Class "A," "B", and "C." Pay close attention to the restrictions on this type of license, and pay close attention to the endorsements that a commercial license can have. The "regular" license cannot have these enforcement. They are restricted to Commercial Driver's License" only.

With that said, if you MH weighs 26001 pounds, you need at least a Class "B" regular license, but you could drive it with a CDL Class B, AND you are towing something that weighs less than 10,000 pounds.

If you are 26,001 pounds and your trailer weights in excess of 10,000 pounds, you need a class "A" but can also drive with a Class "A" CDL.

I'm not an attorney either, (my son is- and without consulting him) you better have a class B or A if the conditions mentioned above are met - or be prepared for some heavy litigation. If you are at fault in an accident, the victim will own you!!!!

Edtied: Oh, and with a CDL class license you can have a restriction of "No Air," meaning no vehicle with air brakes. that does not apply to a regular class license. It should, since you should know about "Slack adjustment, Operating pressures, Warning buzzers, What pressure they are set for, etc., it is not all cut and dry. I drive a MH that does not have a "Park" position on the transmission. My only method of securing the vehicle is an Air Brake. Is it enough? No, you must block the wheels also because if you have a pressure leak your vehicle could roll. (Think young child)

Go get the proper license. You will be more knowledgeable for doing so.

#5 tmoning

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 02:58 PM

In an e-mail to FMCA, Bob Tilley shared his experience regarding the Texas drivers license. With Mr. Tilley’s permission, I have reprinted his e-mail here …

We are very satisfied new FMCA members. Our membership has already paid for itself and then some.

My wife and I have been RVers since 1979. This past March, we purchased our first Class A motorhome, a 2009 Allegro 36QSA rear engine diesel. Shortly after the purchase, we joined FMCA and left on a two-week 1,200-mile “shake down” cruise in our new Allegro.

We were pleasantly surprised when we returned home to find our first issue of Family Motor Coaching magazine (April 2009) waiting for us. We were even more surprised upon reading the Legislative Update on page 70, Texas Drivers License Requirements. We learned that I had been driving our new coach illegally!

I had assumed that my standard Class C Texas drivers license was all that I needed to drive our new motor coach. Wrong! Because our coach has a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of more than 26,000 pounds, I also am required to have the Texas noncommercial Class B license.

I, too, had to take the core commercial drivers license written test and a driving skills test. You cannot imagine how high my stress level shot up when I was advised by the Department of Public Safety that I would be required to parallel park our 36-foot motorhome! Because our coach has an air brake system, I also had to take a written test on air brake systems, and demonstrate how to do a complete air brake systems check.

Just like Mr. Leith, I now find it all rather amusing. It was any thing but that, until I took and passed all of the required tests. (And I was not required to parallel park.)

I am so thankful that I was not stopped by state or local police while driving with the wrong license. That definitely would not have been amusing.

I am so glad that we joined FMCA. Without your article, who knows how I would have learned that I was driving illegally? What if I had been pulled over during a routine traffic stop or, God forbid, had an accident? Would my insurance even have covered me?

We purchased our motorhome out-of-state. I wonder if we had made the purchase in-state if we would have been advised by a Texas dealership of the special license requirement.

I have since talked to our dealership in Louisiana. A considerable number of their sales are to folks who are residents of Texas. The dealership has been selling motorhomes for over 30 years, and yet they said they had never heard of any special license requirements in Texas.

I cannot express my appreciation to FMCA strongly enough. Joining FMCA was one of the smartest things I have done in quite a while. Janis and I are leaving in our new Allegro RED the first part of June on a three-month trip through the western United States, Canada and Alaska. Thanks to FMCA, I'll be driving with the proper license.

Bob and Janis Tilley, F406556
Kirbyville, Texas
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#6 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 10:45 PM

Thanks!
For years I have been preaching that, but most just ignore me (typical).

The difference between tests is negligible, so if you are going for a Cass B license, you may as well go for a Class A. The difference being the weight of a trailer (towable) you can tow. Both are for 26,000 pounds, but a trailer (towable) over 10,000 pounds needs a Cass A. Always go for the air endorsement (blank), because you never know when you may buy a new coach that has air. The biggest reason for upgrading your license is for insurance purposes. Driving with an improper license can cost you dearly.

#7 JackNichols

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 01:04 AM

Quote: "Edtied: Oh, and with a CDL class license you can have a restriction of "No Air," meaning no vehicle with air brakes. that does not apply to a regular class license. It should, since you should know about "Slack adjustment, Operating pressures, Warning buzzers, What pressure they are set for, etc., it is not all cut and dry. I drive a MH that does not have a "Park" position on the transmission. My only method of securing the vehicle is an Air Brake. Is it enough? No, you must block the wheels also because if you have a pressure leak your vehicle could roll. (Think young child) "

Actually, if you lose air pressure, there is no way you CAN move an air brake equipped vehicle. Air brakes by default (no air pressure) are held firmly locked by powerful springs. When operating air pressure is applied to the brakes, those springs are compressed, allowing the wheels to turn. The "parking brake" mentioned above releases air from the brake circuit, engaging the springs to lock the brakes. It may be confusing that there are two air circuits for brakes - one applies the brakes with the brake pedal (also called the foot valve), and the other is the parking brake circuit to release air pressure and activate the parking brake springs. Chocking is never a bad idea, but for different reasons, think belt and suspenders.

I also have a CDL Class A license, and like many, no longer get paid to drive, so really do not need it. It satisfies my Texas license requirement to drive my '40 diesel pusher, and am glad I have 18 wheeler experience to guide me. I keep the CDL in case I need to go to work, and can usually find a CDL job where ever I am. Of course I will have to have a current CDL physical to go to work. CDL holders are held to a higher standard, and penalties are more restrictive, so the consequences of a violation are more painful. I do not conduct myself so I get tickets (knock wood) so do not worry about that.

Now, to the point of my post: Be aware if you get your RV or car inspected in Texas (an annual obligation), there is a distinction between emission controlled or non-emission controlled counties. If you originally came from an emission controlled county, or if your permanent address is in an emission restricted county, you must get an inspection for those counties. If, like me, you are in the state for a short while, and will not go through an emission restricted county this year, you must sign a statement you intend to move to a non-emission county so you can have the inspection sticker to keep Barney Fife off you. Now, I will be out of state for the next six or so months, so if I land for any time back in an emission controlled county, I will have to get my car reinspected to the more restricted rules. Not a big deal, just a hassle and about $25.

(Comment raving about the government is deleted.)

This information might be helpful to someone.
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#8 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 08:00 PM

Jack,
You are absolutely correct about the air brakes. It was my post you were citing and I had my mind somewhere else in that paragraph. Depending on the terrain, I still chock the wheels. Things can happen.

I don't intend on getting ticketed for an infraction of the rules, but one reason I gave up the CDL portion was just in case I did, I could take deferred adjudication, or defensive driving. With a CDL you are stuck paying the ticket and it stays on the books for awhile. A couple of tickets on the books and your insurance will go up! Besides, I'm to old to go back to work, especially driving commercially.

Thanks for the clarification.

I really think every motor home driver should read and understand the CDL portion of any states licensing authority. There is so much to gain from that information. Isn't it amazing that even a simple auto driver's license test is taken one time and they it must be assumed that you will remember that for the rest of your driving life. I think not. Just getting the licensing book and reading it every couple of years will instill some lost knowledge in the memory bank. In most cases the tests are common sense questions if you think about it.

Happy trails to everyone.

#9 nspencer

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 09:16 PM

I believe Texas drivers license for large motorhomes may be one of the most confusing subjects. When we upgraded to a larger MH, the Texas salesperson (who seemed to be knowledgeable) told us no special license was needed.

We then asked our insurance agent (who owns a large MH) and he said nothing special was needed. He said it was called a "house car," a term we had never heard before.

We then called the DPS office and they said we needed a Class B, non CDL.

When we took delivery of our MH, we told the salesperson what the DPS had said. He then made his own phone calls, to whom I do not remember, and assured me we do not need a Class B license.

We proceeded to study for the test, but when we went to the DPS office, we asked for an explanation of one line about an exception. That started a heated discussion between two office personel and a DPS officer who happened to be in the office. They pulled out more books, made other phone calls, etc. but were unable to reach an agreement. One said Class B license, the other two said Class C.

We took the test, got a Class B license, and travel with slightly more piece of mind.
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#10 tmoning

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 07:44 AM

You are not able to renew this license via phone or Internet. ... Finding this out at the last minute cost me a $500 flight to Dallas (city with the lowest fare) in order to sign my name and have my picture taken. You will need to plan ahead, so this doesn't happen to you.

According to the Texas Department of Public Safety Web site, if you are not domiciled in Texas but need to renew a Class A or Class B noncommercial license, you do not have to apply in person at a Texas driver's license office. Texas allows mail-in renewal of class A and B noncommercial licenses.

The CDL-2 exemption certification form must be completed to secure the Class A or Class B noncommercial licenses. For more information, see http://www.txdps.sta...taryrenewal.htm.

Here is an excerpt from the Texas Department of Public Safety's out-of-state license renewal instructions:

"The Commercial Driver License Law mandates that a commercial driver license must include the applicants color photograph; therefore, DRIVERS WHO NEED A CLASS A, B, OR C COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MUST APPLY IN PERSON at a Texas driver license office. If you are not domiciled in Texas you must obtain a license from the state where you currently reside.

"Operators of Class A or B vehicles who are exempt from the commercial Driver License Act may renew by mail. If you qualify for a class A or B non-CDL, please complete the CDL-2 (Exemption Certification) form.When applying for a duplicate or a renewal of a Texas non-commercial driver license or identification card, provide a Texas residence address. Upon request, the license may be mailed to your current out of state address. Please provide the mailing address in the designated space on the application.

"Any license issued via the mail will be produced with the previous digital photograph on file. If there is no digital photograph on file, a 'Valid Without Photo' license or identification card will be produced."
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#11 GARYGIBSON

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 01:59 PM

SO CONFUSED!!!! :blink: HERE IS A DIRECT EXCERPT FROM THE TEXAS DRIVERS HANDBOOK.


COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE (CDL) - (Transportation Code, Chapter 522)

[color="#FFFF00"]Exemptions: Persons operating the following vehicles are exempt from a Commercial Driver License (CDL):[/color]
1. Class A Commercial Driver License permits a person to drive any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, provided the gross vehicle weight rating of the vehicle or vehicles being towed exceeds 10,000 pounds.
1. A vehicle that is: a. controlled and operated by a farmer;
b. used to transport agricultural products, farm machinery, or farm sup- plies to or from a farm;
c. not used in the operations of a common or contract motor carrier; and
d. used within 150 miles of the persons farm.
2. A fire-fighting or emergency vehicle necessary to the preservation of life or property or the execution of emergency governmental functions, whether operated by an employee of a political subdivision or by a volunteer fire fighter;
3. A military vehicle or a commercial motor vehicle when operated for military purposes by military personnel, members of the Reserves and National Guard on active duty, including personnel on full-time National Guard duty, personnel on part-time training, and National Guard military technicians;
4. A recreational vehicle that is driven for personal use;
5. A vehicle that is owned, leased, or controlled by an air carrier, as defined by Section 21.155 of the Transportation Code, and that is driven or operated exclusively by an employee of the air carrier only on the premises of an airport, as defined by Section 22.001 of the Transportation Code, on service roads to which the public does not have access; or
6. A vehicle used exclusively to transport seed cotton modules or cotton burrs.


IS THIS INACCURATE???? DIRECT FROM THE DRIVER'S HANDBOOK?
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#12 wolfe10

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 02:16 PM

Gary,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

Correct, you do not need a CDL.

As many have posted on this thread, you do need a Class B license if the GVWR is over 26,000 pounds.
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#13 TBUTLER

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 10:25 PM

And just a brief addendum here.

Louise and I have been licensed in South Dakota for almost 10 years. When we were preparing for our Texas drivers license we investigated all the information and read the drivers license book carefully. All said and done, we needed a class B license for our rig and toad. I thought we were going to have to take the test but no. Louise called the office and they asked if our South Dakota license allowed us to drive our rig and yes, it did. That license was not a special license, just a regular drivers license as that was all that South Dakota required. We went to the license bureau and presented our South Dakota license, after the clerk made a phone call, we were given our Class B Texas drivers license, no test. If you have a license from another state that meets that states standards for driving your motor home, based on our experience, you should be able to get the class A or B license you need to drive your motor home in Texas without taking a test. We simply specified that we needed a Class B license when we filled out the application and talked to the clerk.

As an aside, if you are a winter Texan, get your initial vehicle inspection and drivers license deep in the winter season at a time that you are sure to be there before the inspection and license renewal become necessary. That way you shouldn't have to make a special trip to Texas to renew these documents. If you don't want to make that trip, our vehicle licenses in South Dakota with no inspection were easily obtained by mail. Drivers license renewal in South Dakota does require your presence there (5 year renewal) and thanks to the Department of Homeland Security, now requires a stay in state with proof (RV park receipt) of your stay for a short period of time (I think it is just one night but might be several). With the increased requirements for drivers licenses meeting security demands, I think you will find that all states will be requiring actual presence for renewing licenses.
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Posted 18 August 2011 - 12:25 AM

Gary,
It is absolutely correct as you posted it for section 522 of the Texas code. However, it is the wrong section, wrong code.

Here is the one that pertains to you: (If you notice, you are still required to have one of the 4 classes of license, depending on the type of vehicle you are driving - and it is NOT commercial.)


CLASSIFIED DRIVER LICENSE (Texas Transportation Code, Section 521)
The following listed Class A, B, C, and M licenses will be issued to persons
who are exempt from obtaining a Commercial Driver License or persons who
are not required to obtain a Commercial Driver License
:

1. Class A driver license permits a person to drive any vehicle or combination
of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or
more, provided the gross vehicle weight rating of the vehicle(s) being towed
is in excess of 10,000 pounds; including a vehicle included in Class B or
Class C, except a motorcycle or moped.

Minimum Ages: 18, or 17 with completion of an approved driver education
course including classroom and practical training or approval of minors
hardship application.

Fee: $24.00 for 6 years. Applicants under the age of 18 are charged $5.00
for a license to expire on the next birthday.

2. Class B driver license permits a person to drive the following vehicles,
except a motorcycle or moped:

a. a single unit vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001
pounds or more, and any such vehicle towing either a vehicle with a
gross vehicle weight rating that does not exceed 10,000 pounds, or a
farm trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating that does not exceed
20,000 pounds;

b. a bus with a seating capacity of 24 passengers or more, including the
driver; and

c. a vehicle included in Class C.

Minimum Ages: 18, or 17 with completion of an approved driver education
course including classroom and practical training or approval of a minors
hardship application.

Fee: $24.00 for 6 years. Applicants under the age of 18 are charged $5.00
for a license to expire on the next birthday.

3. Class C driver license permits a person to drive the following vehicles,
except a motorcycle or moped:

a. a single unit vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that is not a Class A
or B; and

b. a single unit vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than
26,001 pounds, towing a trailer not to exceed 10,000 pounds gross vehicle
weight rating or a farm trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating that
does not exceed 20,000 pounds.

Minimum Ages: 18, or 16 with completion of an approved course of driver
education including classroom and practical training, or 15 with approval of
minors hardship application.

Fee: $24.00 for 6 years. Applicants under the age of 18 are charged $5.00
for a license to expire on the next birthday.

4. Class M driver license permits a person to drive a motorcycle or moped.

#15 rorr1821

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 10:43 AM

I am a Texan and since we are not fulltime we have a house in Texas. Everything said about needing a Class B licenses to operate a MH over 26001 lbs in Texas is correct. I have a neighbor who has a large MH and for years has argued he did not need a class B licenses. The point Wayne 77590 made is right on target concerning insurance company's assumption of risk for an illegally operated vehicle. If you had a small claim this would probably not be an issue, but on a large payout I could easily see an insurance company using this as a reason to deny the claim. As someone else stated, get the class B and be legal. Yes, you must side parallel park unless Texas accepts your out of State license. You will also need to take the written test and driving test.

Also the point about having the Class B with the CDL endorsement has given me cause to reconsider if I want to keep that endorsement. No one looks forward to getting a ticket but with the CDL you have no option's to adjudicate the ticket.

Ray
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Posted 18 August 2011 - 05:40 PM

(For TEXAS)
This subject has come up so many times on different forums. I think the problem is that people pull up the on-line version, as I did, and then search on the words "CDL," or "Commercial." They get Section 522 and read that part that was outlined in red above and say they don't need a commercial drivers license. And they are correct, they do not need a commercial drivers license unless they are using their RV as a business. If you look at both type of licenses in Section 521, and then 522, you will see that they both have Class A, B, C, and M. The difference is if you are using the vehicle for commercial purposes. It really is confusing when they have that statement about RV's in the CDL section. I think they should annotate it with "See Section 521 for Non-CDL Licenses." But hey, I'm not a bureaucrat writing manuals. It all comes down to the weight factor, an most Class A RV's will fall into the Class B license area. Those pulling big box trailers with their auto inside may fall into the Class A category if their trailer weighs 10,000 pounds. Just pulling a TOAD, even a 1 ton pickup, would fall into a Class B license unless the 1 ton is 10,000 pounds or more.

I had a CDL up until about two years ago. I had a bump and thump, single vehicle, and it was my fault. With the CDL, as Ray stated, there was no adjudication other than paying the fine. I converted it into a Non-CDL Class A since I am not driving commercially anymore. Now if I get a ticket I can take deferred adjudication, or defensive driving and not have it go on my record.

#17 Tobyjug

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 06:19 PM

Hi all. Very informative thread. However, be aware that not all Texas DMV Offices require a Road test to upgrade from a Class C to a Class B Non CDL License. I called around several DMV Offices and while most required both a written and a road test, one office did not require a road test. When I challenged them and said all other offices seemed to require a Road Test, they responded that it was at the discresion of the Manager at each office. So I travelled a little further a got an upgrade to a Class B Non CDL with just a written test.
So call a few different Texas DMV offices, you may be able to avoid the Road Test.

David B
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#18 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 10:53 AM

David,

That is unreal. Wow!

#19 TBUTLER

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 10:00 PM

Just when you think you have it all figured out, zap, there goes your theory! I know it is Texas but I think the DPS could hire an English proficient writer to rewrite the whole drivers manual and then maybe it would be clear enough that the rest of us could understand it. Perhaps they prefer to keep it so muddled that local officals can make up their own rules!
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Tom and Louise Butler
2004 Monaco Windsor, Cummins 400 ISL
Roadmaster Sterling Tow Bar, Brakemaster, GMC Acadia, BikeE Recumbent Bicycles

After 9 1/2 years full time in our motor home and being Winter Texans we are now living at Sandpipers Resort in Edinburg, Texas. Now we are Summer Chickens!

"The tipi is much better to live in; always clean and warm in winter, cool in summer, easy to move... If the Great Spirit wanted men to live in one place he would have made the world stand still." -- Flying Hawk, South Dakota Oglala Sioux


#20 mikelm48

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 07:27 AM

Hi all. Very informative thread. However, be aware that not all Texas DMV Offices require a Road test to upgrade from a Class C to a Class B Non CDL License. I called around several DMV Offices and while most required both a written and a road test, one office did not require a road test. When I challenged them and said all other offices seemed to require a Road Test, they responded that it was at the discresion of the Manager at each office. So I travelled a little further a got an upgrade to a Class B Non CDL with just a written test.
So call a few different Texas DMV offices, you may be able to avoid the Road Test.

David B

David, which office did you go to?

Mike
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