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Michlin XZE2+ or Goodyear G670 RV tires?

Tire Michlin Goodyear G670 XZE2

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#1 ghfromva

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 08:19 PM

I have the G670s on my 2006 Revolution now. I had the front tire blowout at 28,100 miles. Almost lost control of RV. Just missed going off bridge by two feet. The tires are 7 years old. I keep the tires covered, check air pressure and under weight limits. I could just replace the other 5 tires with Goodyear or go with new set of the xze2s. Which tire would you pick?
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#2 RVerOnTheMove

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 08:25 PM

If all of your other tires are also 7 years old then I would suggest that you replace them all. Michelin says that their normal life-span is 10 years but most all of the other manufacturers say 7 years. I don't think you will do better with one or the other so take a look at the best pricing and be sure to see how the FMCA Michelin pricing impacts that decision.
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#3 wolfe10

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 10:41 AM

Actually, Michelin says UP TO 10 years, with annual inspections by a tire professional beginning at 5 years.

So, 10 years is the absolute outside number, not the suggest life of the average tire.
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#4 RVerOnTheMove

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 11:20 AM

I don't think anyone gives a fixed life span on their tires. I know that my Michelin's were over 10 years old when I replaced them and then only due to wear. They were just starting to show some signs of cracking as well but not enough that I was concerned. Michelin recommends that tires be replaced at 10 years assuming there are no issues with the tires that would require an earlier replacement.
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#5 Allegiance40x

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 05:38 PM

I'd chose the one where you get the best deal, they'll age out before they'll wear out...also, change all six. Try Toyos.
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#6 AndyShane

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 08:53 AM

I just spent time with a Rev owner with your tires, same vintage, he was experiencing classic Goodyear wear problems. Our rigs were side by side, he was drooling over my Michelins of the same age with no visible wear.

If I recall, folks believe Goodyears are less tolerant of non-optimum inflation. It shows in the form of scalloped marks on the outside edges of the tread.

I'll replace mine with the Michelins, without a doubt. I like our tire specialist's advice: replace steering tires at 5 yrs or half tread, whichever occurs first. Manufacturers might give longer spans; but, with the steering tires, I'd prefer to err to the conservative.
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#7 tomgauger

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 08:57 AM

Another point: Assuming our coaches can handle either size, would you go with 315's or stick with 295's? I'm told my '01 Monaco Exec can use the 315's.
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#8 howardsmith

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 06:43 PM

Im going to buy new tires for the front of my MH. Has anyone ever bought Westlake tires? If so, any feedback?
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#9 clbuchheit33

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 01:23 PM

Goodyear makes another tire recommended for RV application, G149RSA. About $100 less than the G670 RVs with nearly identical specifications. I'm replacing my 7 year old G670s with them. The 670s are 7 years old with 22,000 miles on them and show no signs of cracking but I worry about them and will feel much safer with new tires.


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#10 tubetweak

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 06:01 PM

I am a commercial tire dealer. I am dealer for Michelin, Goodyear and also sell some Bridgestone truck tires.

Michelin does not say 10 years. They say they "While most tires will need replacement before they achieve 10 years, it is recommended that any tires in service 10 years or more from the date of manufacture, including spare tires, be replaced with new tires as a simple precaution even if such tires appear serviceable and even if they have not reached the legal wear limit."

They also say " This service-related evolution varies widely so that accurately predicting the serviceable life of any specific tire in advance is not possible. That is why, in addition to regular inspections and inflation pressure maintenance by consumers, it is recommended to have RV/Motorhome tires, including spare tires, inspected regularly by a qualified tire specialist, such as a tire dealer, who will assess the tire’s suitability for continued service. Tires that have been in use for 5 years or more should continue to be inspected by a specialist at least annually. "

As a tire dealer, and with over 30 years commercial tire experience, including retreading, I cannot look inside the body of the tire and tell you the heat history or strength of the bond between the rubber and the steel in the tire. It all depends on the heat history of this tire and the severity of other problems caused from "scrubs, bumps, scuffs, potholes hit, curbs climbed, etc....). Plus new tire quality during construction, etc..

As a trained tire dealer, much of this "evidence" is very hard to see. Sometimes having to look inside the tire is the only way to see the extent of the damage. As an RV'er myself, I'm done with the tire at the end of it's warranty... usually 5 years. I drive the RV for fun and family time, vacations, etc. To me it is worth peace of mind knowing that I am driving on safe tires and they are still covered under the manufacturers warranty. If I am on a vacation with my Family... the last thing I want is tire trouble on the road!

Here is the Michelin warranty...
"MICHELIN® truck tires bearing the MICHELIN® name and complete serial and identification numbers, used in consumer service, such as on a motorhome, according to the instructions contained in this Operator’s Manual, are covered by this limited warranty against defects in workmanship and materials for the life of the original tread, or five years from the date of purchase, whichever occurs first. At that time, all warranties, expressed or implied, expire.

Michelin/Goodyear/Bridgestone??? Depends on Vehicle Manufacturer, wheel specs, weight in all wheel positions, etc.... You need to consult a professional for your exact coach. Different tires for different purposes and not all brands are "the best"... depending on exact tire for your exact coach and weight requirements.

Some sizes in certain brands can carry more load because the "Load Range" is different. But it also depends on the wheels too. If you go up from a Load Range H to a Load Range J in the same size, you can usually add aditional air pressure to carry more load... but only if the wheel is rated for the extra pressure. You need to know this before upsizing or uping the "Load Rating".

There are many good tires out there to do specific jobs. There are also a lot of "not so good" tires since they may not do the job you are wanting them to do. Every brand has both!

When I sell Michelin tires to RV'ers, I will always recommend the Michelin Advantage Program through FMCA. It is a great program that can save you money on Michelin tires. But that does not make the decision on which tire to recommend. It all depends on the situation, use, weight of the coach, etc...

I have Goodyear tires on my coach because they came on it. They are good, smooth tires after properly balancing them. (They were not properly balanced from the factory). I will keep them until they get 4 years old or so. When it comes up time for replacement, (5 yrs MAXIMUM for me), I will evaluate needs from weight ratings and how I am using the vehicle and offerings from tire companies that match my needs and make an educated decision at that time. (I will probably not go with Bridgestone or Toyo since they do usually ride slightly harsher because of Manufacturing differences in their sidewalls). But Michelin, Goodyear and Continental are all in the running as far as I am concerned. It will depend totally on what is needed to best suit my coach and my driving habits.


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#11 thrushl

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:31 PM

I am a commercial tire dealer. I am dealer for Michelin, Goodyear and also sell some Bridgestone truck tires.

Michelin does not say 10 years. They say they "While most tires will need replacement before they achieve 10 years, it is recommended that any tires in service 10 years or more from the date of manufacture, including spare tires, be replaced with new tires as a simple precaution even if such tires appear serviceable and even if they have not reached the legal wear limit."

They also say " This service-related evolution varies widely so that accurately predicting the serviceable life of any specific tire in advance is not possible. That is why, in addition to regular inspections and inflation pressure maintenance by consumers, it is recommended to have RV/Motorhome tires, including spare tires, inspected regularly by a qualified tire specialist, such as a tire dealer, who will assess the tire’s suitability for continued service. Tires that have been in use for 5 years or more should continue to be inspected by a specialist at least annually. "

As a tire dealer, and with over 30 years commercial tire experience, including retreading, I cannot look inside the body of the tire and tell you the heat history or strength of the bond between the rubber and the steel in the tire. It all depends on the heat history of this tire and the severity of other problems caused from "scrubs, bumps, scuffs, potholes hit, curbs climbed, etc....). Plus new tire quality during construction, etc..

As a trained tire dealer, much of this "evidence" is very hard to see. Sometimes having to look inside the tire is the only way to see the extent of the damage. As an RV'er myself, I'm done with the tire at the end of it's warranty... usually 5 years. I drive the RV for fun and family time, vacations, etc. To me it is worth peace of mind knowing that I am driving on safe tires and they are still covered under the manufacturers warranty. If I am on a vacation with my Family... the last thing I want is tire trouble on the road!

Here is the Michelin warranty...
"MICHELIN® truck tires bearing the MICHELIN® name and complete serial and identification numbers, used in consumer service, such as on a motorhome, according to the instructions contained in this Operator’s Manual, are covered by this limited warranty against defects in workmanship and materials for the life of the original tread, or five years from the date of purchase, whichever occurs first. At that time, all warranties, expressed or implied, expire.

Michelin/Goodyear/Bridgestone??? Depends on Vehicle Manufacturer, wheel specs, weight in all wheel positions, etc.... You need to consult a professional for your exact coach. Different tires for different purposes and not all brands are "the best"... depending on exact tire for your exact coach and weight requirements.

Some sizes in certain brands can carry more load because the "Load Range" is different. But it also depends on the wheels too. If you go up from a Load Range H to a Load Range J in the same size, you can usually add aditional air pressure to carry more load... but only if the wheel is rated for the extra pressure. You need to know this before upsizing or uping the "Load Rating".

There are many good tires out there to do specific jobs. There are also a lot of "not so good" tires since they may not do the job you are wanting them to do. Every brand has both!

When I sell Michelin tires to RV'ers, I will always recommend the Michelin Advantage Program through FMCA. It is a great program that can save you money on Michelin tires. But that does not make the decision on which tire to recommend. It all depends on the situation, use, weight of the coach, etc...

I have Goodyear tires on my coach because they came on it. They are good, smooth tires after properly balancing them. (They were not properly balanced from the factory). I will keep them until they get 4 years old or so. When it comes up time for replacement, (5 yrs MAXIMUM for me), I will evaluate needs from weight ratings and how I am using the vehicle and offerings from tire companies that match my needs and make an educated decision at that time. (I will probably not go with Bridgestone or Toyo since they do usually ride slightly harsher because of Manufacturing differences in their sidewalls). But Michelin, Goodyear and Continental are all in the running as far as I am concerned. It will depend totally on what is needed to best suit my coach and my driving habits.

 

 

You make some great points.  I'm a computer guy not a tire man like you so I'll take your advice  I have a 2005 Holiday Rambler  Navigator weighing just under 46,000 pounds.  I only do freeways (normal speed is 55-60) and a lot of them (30K last year alone) often in the south in summer... well over 100 each day.  Clearly the tires get hot.  I'm coming up on 4.5 years.  

 

I rarely curb a tire...very rarely, but freeways in California and Illinois only have limited blacktop between the potholes, eh?

 

Recommendations? I have another maintenance issue ongoing and while it's in the shop, I might as well do it all and get the pain over.  I have a tag so I will need 10 tires.  I carry 23K on my drive axle (under the rating guys...) but that is after the masters in Florida set the suspension. If it matters, last year I put 10 Koni shocks on...


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#12 RobDays

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 11:42 AM

10 Tires? I thought there is two in the front + four on the driving axes + two on the tag which equal 8 total. Hello?


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#13 thrushl

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 11:55 AM

10 Tires? I thought there is two in the front + four on the driving axes + two on the tag which equal 8 total. Hello?

 

 

You got me..... 8 is the min.... BUT I always buy two spares with a complete set so they are all the same age.


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"There are many things given to us in this life. What we do with such things; that is the true mark of a man!"

 

2005 Holiday Rambler Navigator

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Traveling the country with two cats and a wife!

 


#14 larrylovvorn@yahoo.com

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 09:21 AM

I have used both Goodyear and Michelin tires on three different Holiday Rambler Endeavor motorhomes.

 

The first, a 2002 came equipped with Goodyear. I experienced severe "cupping" and replaced them with Michelin "steer" tires. No more tire issues with that coach.

 

The second coach, 2006 Endeavor, came equipped with Goodyear tires. I only kept that coach one year, had no tire issues in 12K miles.

 

The third coach, 2007 Endeavor, came equipped with Michelin. I now have 51K miles in six years, no issues. I will replace them next week with Michelin using the FMCA Advantage Program.


I belong to the Holiday Rambler Diesel Pusher Chapter 419 group. We have a great maintenance session rally each year. Tires are always a topic of discussion. Goodyear seems to have had a history of "cupping" and "rivering" wear patterns on the outer edges of the front tires. I haven't heard or experienced any similar issues with Michelin.

 

Personally, I will use Michelin and change them within the 5-6 year time period I feel comfortable with.


Larry


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#15 AndyShane

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 02:33 PM

You all have put the Fear of God in me...   I've already put XZEs on the front, scheduling the rears as soon as she gets in off the road.  

I just parked next to a 2007 Scepter owner -- he hates the bus* -- here in Galveston, and he opted to put XZEs on the steering axle and installed a full set of Wanli tires on the rear axles.

 

His argument: that casino bus operators have deemed the Chinese Wanli as a favorite, "...they cruise 80 mph loaded with people..."

 

Your thoughts?

 

BTW, my tire guy re-torqued the steering wheels after 100 miles of driving, said that one lugnut was indeed loose.  Remember to do a second torque!!

 

 

 

* His is plagued with electrical woes, I was saying that I've signed off my 60th writeup prior to the end of my first trip, and that some stem from improper rigging or hardware on the assemblyline.


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Defected from iRV2 in March 2012 after that forum suffered an outbreak of political bullying; once again contributing there as RVNeophytes2 effective Feb 6, 2013.


#16 wjs822

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 11:54 AM

Getting ready to change out Goodyears for 6 Michelins on an 06' Endeavor. I am pleased with the FMCA price.

 

I was considering putting on GY 670's but can get Michelins for cheaper.


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#17 dougallman

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 03:27 PM

Recently purchased a 2004 Beaver Marquis in California with original Goodyears on. Had the broker take to Michelin dealer and replaced all with Michelins, and, installed balance masters on all 3 axles.

 

We have owned motorhomes and coach's since 1969 and keeping tires smooth and true has been a lifelong task.

 

Story told to me in regards to "balancing" the Coach tires indicated that at a Rally's Michelin demonstrated how a Coach, with the weight mass it has, can actually move the tire on the wheel during us RV'rs driving habits. They demonstrated this by taking a coach with newly mounted tires and going from the rally on a drive where they reenacted the driving we RV'rs do with curbs, hard braking, potholes etc. Seems they wanted us to know they do not make bad tires.

 

Prior to leaving they marked the wheels and the tires position on them. When they returned, as I was told, some tires had moved almost 180 degrees from their original positions.

 

The point Michelin was making was that you can get your tires balanced with wheel weights and the next trip it seems like they are square again. (I do believe they also noted that you cannot put anything in the tire or it voids the warranty)

 

I have even had the tires balanced on the motorhomes and Coach, when I could find a shop that did this. Almost impossible to find one now.

 

Nevertheless, if you are balancing a tire/wheel that are not staying as a consistent assembly it is an exercise in futility. Trust me I know. I take a lot of pride in having my stuff right and poor handling or cupped tires does not fit this picture.

 

We have now driven 6000 miles with the balance masters, and in Oklahoma and New Mexico we hit some dandy chuck holes at night on our way home from LA, and I could not be happier on how the smoothness of the ride is.

 

 


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#18 rogercarson

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 08:36 PM

Last year I purchased a 40' diesel Excursion in California and the tires have lots of tread, only 27,000 miles, but the age is causing some concern so I will be getting the tires replaced. They have Goodyear G670 now, but the Michelin plan tires were considerably less in Fort Worth,TX where we are now. The Goodyear man said if we bought any tire to drive them about 2000 miles and then have the two outside rear tires swapped with the two front tires and my wear pattern would be established and my wear problems would be almost eliminated.

 

Do you even rotate motorhome tires, never heard from anyone about this part of buying tires and their upkeep.

 

Thanks


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#19 ahepburn51

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 11:35 PM

Do you even rotate motorhome tires, never heard from anyone about this part of buying tires and their upkeep.

 

Thanks

 

We've got over 18K miles on our motorhome now and never rotated the tires - they were replaced about a month ago due to age, but the wear was pretty minimal.

 

Before the motorhome we had a Ford F450 towing a fifth wheel - it had 92K miles on the original set of tires with no rotation, and about 30K on the second set of tires when we sold it - again no rotation. I don't rotate the tires on our cars either - unless they show abnormal wear from bad alignment.


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#20 Allegiance40x

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 09:30 AM

Most RVers driving MHs don't rotate the tires.


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