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New To RVing


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#1 Mahakal

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 02:57 PM

Hello Everyone,

Just bought a new to us 2002 Kountrystar.

Very exited to enjoy it.

This is our first motorhome, so we're looking forward for do and don'ts with the Family and Maintaining.

All comments and opinions welcome.

Thanks in Advance :rolleyes:
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#2 hermanmullins

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 03:29 PM

Mahakal,

Welcome to the Forum.

The Forum is a place where there is never a dumb question. We have all been there, done that and all have the T-Shirt. One thing that will help you get the best answers is to always Tell what kind of coach, model, length, engine size and the mfg. of the item you may have a question about. This way you will always get an answer from someone that has the same as you and may have had the same questions.

Good Luck and Welcome to the RVing Life Style.
  • 0

"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins
Whitewright, TEXAS
F302225
'02 Monaco Dynasty
40 ft 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
US Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#3 papabill48

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 05:50 PM

Bought our first motorhome in Nov - traded in a travel trailer. bought a 2012 Ace 29.1 by Thor. Have been having a
great time doing the eastern coast. Looking forward to traveling on the Blue Ridge Mountain Parkway - anyone have any suggestions about
traveling there and when is the best time?
  • 0

#4 karenandcollins

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 01:53 PM

We bought our first motorhome a little over 2 years ago & hit the road as full-timers. It was scary what we didn't know! Everyday we had a "learning curve". We're learning more everyday & I'm very thankful for the forums & the many other RVers out there who are willing to share their help & knowledge.

We try to help someone else whenever we can to pay it forward. I would also suggest attending Rallies. We have learned so much from them & you meet a lot of really nice people! Enjoy your motorhome & don't let the little things along the way get you down.
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#5 lewisedge

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 04:13 PM

Last month (May 2012) after renting on and off for several decades, I finally bought my first motor home. It's a like-new 2011 Itasca Model 33C that had 7,000 miles on it. My wife and I plan to spend increasing amounts of time traveling. We have equipped it with virtually everything we need for day-to-day living. To hit the road, all we need to do is grab some clean clothes, which is so much simpler than picking up and fully-equipping a rented coach from scratch; then unpacking it all at the end.

On our first trip, one thing that really annoyed us was the rattling china and glasses that we had packed into our kitchen cabinet. Having previously bought a $10 foam rubber twin bed mattress topper from Walmart, from which I had cut some small pieces for another purpose, I measured and cut a piece of it that exactly fits the bottom of our dish cabinet. Having foam under the dishes and glasses dramatically reduced the amount of vibration that is transmitted from the moving coach, largely solving the china/glass rattling problem. Plastic dishes and cups would be quieter, but we like the luxury of china and glass. Perhaps other motor home owners have other suggestions for keeping the coach quiet while on the road.
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#6 TBUTLER

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 07:43 PM

We started out with a trip of about 15 miles. I turned a corner and dumped some dishes out of a cabinet. Go slow on corners! In fact, just go slow. It is what RV's are known for you know. No matter how fast you drive, traffic will speed up to get past you! After our 15 mile trip we stayed parked for a month, just getting to know the motor home and getting used to the utilities and rearranging everything in compartments. When we needed something we were just a few miles from home. If we found things we didn't need we were just a few miles from home. Then we set out on a 2500 mile round trip in a week and a half. After I got used to driving, I put Louise in the drivers seat on some straight four lane little traveled road. I didn't think I would get the wheel back she enjoyed it so much. She still does. We got lost trying to find our first RV park on the road, drove some interesting roads and ended up boonedocking our first night on the road.

Now we use bungees on the cabinets with dishes! We have the campground guide book open to the page with directions as we locate a park that is unfamiliar to us. We know what kind of gas stations we can get into and out of. We look twice before turning down any road. The first several years we occasionally had to stop and unhook the toad so we could turn around. You will live and learn!
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Tom and Louise Butler
2004 Monaco Windsor, Cummins 400 ISL
Roadmaster Sterling Tow Bar, Brakemaster, GMC Acadia, BikeE Recumbent Bicycles

After 9 1/2 years full time in our motor home and being Winter Texans we are now living at Sandpipers Resort in Edinburg, Texas. Now we are Summer Chickens!

"The tipi is much better to live in; always clean and warm in winter, cool in summer, easy to move... If the Great Spirit wanted men to live in one place he would have made the world stand still." -- Flying Hawk, South Dakota Oglala Sioux


#7 RVerOnTheMove

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 09:16 PM

We also like china plates. This is our home so I see no reason to eat off of paper or Correle (no disrespect intended). What my wife did was flip over each piece, run a bead of silicone caulk around the base, flip it over onto some waxed paper and let it dry. We now have our own Blue Danube china on-board which we can stack as we please and they don't make a sound and they don't move unless we have to make a life-threatening move/stop. Bungees (as mentioned above) would have prevented our last loss but since this has only happened twice in the last 12 years it's not that high on our priorities list.
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Bill

#8 danddferr

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 07:54 PM

Can kozies around your good wine glasses will keep them from breaking and quiet. Best wishes on your new adventure. Many happy miles and smiles. :)

Dan
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Dan and Donna Tiffin Allegro 32BA FRED towing a Honda Fit using Ready Brake tow system. There are 10 types of people in this world.... those who understand binary and those who don't!

#9 RVerOnTheMove

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 08:32 PM

Nice new, clean athletic socks work well to keep your glassware safe as well if you can't find a safe place where they will not bang around.
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Bill

#10 hermanmullins

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 08:22 AM

Every coach carries paper plates. Place one under each plate. Or you can purchase rubberized shelf material and cut pieces to go under plates, saucers and or bowls. For stem ware purchase 1" to 2" foam sheets. Cut it to fit shelf. Press stem ware down on foam and cut circle or square with razor blade remove foam and you have a place to have your stem ware held in place and they wont bang against each other.
  • 0

"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins
Whitewright, TEXAS
F302225
'02 Monaco Dynasty
40 ft 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
US Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#11 aileencook

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 10:29 AM

After camping for some time now - we went the whole round - pop up, pull behind, fifth wheel, and now a 35ft Georgetown Motorhome. My husband finds driving the motorhome easier than pulling the fifth wheel. We drove to Stone Mountain GA for our first long trip with the grandkids - we all had a wonderful time. I decided to try my hand at driving the Georgetown - little did I know there was a lot of play in the steering and handed the driving back to him after 30 minutes of white knuckles. My wonderful husband has now ordered a steering stabilizer kit - hopefully that will help me get back in the drivers seat.
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#12 lewisedge

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 08:35 AM

RVerOnTheMove's suggestion to use athletic socks was brilliant. I found inexpensive tube socks at Walmart, washed and cut them in two and had enough to wrap every glass and cup. They've been completely silenced and my china/glassware cabinet looks much neater.
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#13 lewisedge

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 08:48 AM

Slightly modifying Herman Mullins' suggestion, I put Styrofoam plates between each china plate in my cabinet. Applying the athletic sock suggestion from another blogger, for my glasses and cups, my china/glassware cabinet is now dramatically quieter and neater. Thanks to all for your valuable suggestions.
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#14 robjana

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 09:51 AM

Hi,

Please let me know how the new stabilizer works out for you. We have the same problem and driving our MH( a 1993 Cobra) is very hard especially in the mountains.

Thanks
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#15 lewisedge

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:55 AM

Bought our first motorhome in Nov - traded in a travel trailer. bought a 2012 Ace 29.1 by Thor. Have been having a
great time doing the eastern coast. Looking forward to traveling on the Blue Ridge Mountain Parkway - anyone have any suggestions about
traveling there and when is the best time?

My favorite time of the year is in the Fall (October-Mid-November). Temperatures are moderate, enabling you to enjoy the fresh mountain air and the colors are spectacular.
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#16 ScoutsPal

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 07:09 AM

I, too, am curious about the stabilizer. I was reading that they take out the side to side rocking on gas coaches. Does anyone know if they can be used to reduce/remove a slight lean. Our 2008 Bounder leans slightly to streetside because, they say, of the two slides on that side. I did have someone look at the suspension and they said it looked fine.
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Mike and Sandy F426900
Chesterfield, MI
2013 Tiffin Allegro 36LA

 

 

"On the road again, I just can't wait to get on the road again."

Willie Nelson


#17 pallikas

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 08:14 AM

One thing that I found with the cabinets was to buy and install additional snap catches on the doors. Effectively doubling up the holding capacity of the doors. They were $0.98 each at the local home depot, and really keeps the doors tight. Also, got the dish holders from Camping world, which stack the plates and hold them, with a neoprene bottom. Using Correlle dishes, they stack tighter and do not rattle.
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2005 Winnebago Journey 36C Diesel Pusher
2007 Harley Electra Glide Ultra

#18 hermanmullins

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 08:22 AM

Mike, You might check how your coach is loaded. Which side is your water and holding tank on? Go have your coach weighed.(each wheel). You may find too much weight on your street side (left). If you can't find a place to weigh your coach try unloading your coach and empty your tanks. Then check both sides for height. If it sits level then you know it is weigh distribution. If it still has a slight lean try another shop.
Also if you have independent front suspension do you have air bags in the coil springs? If so check pressure in each.
  • 0

"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins
Whitewright, TEXAS
F302225
'02 Monaco Dynasty
40 ft 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
US Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#19 wolfe10

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 09:47 AM

I, too, am curious about the stabilizer. I was reading that they take out the side to side rocking on gas coaches. Does anyone know if they can be used to reduce/remove a slight lean. Our 2008 Bounder leans slightly to streetside because, they say, of the two slides on that side. I did have someone look at the suspension and they said it looked fine.

I believe you are talking about SWAY BARS (also called ANTI-SWAY BARS). Your chassis may already have one or two. And yes if you have excessive side to side rocking as you drive they are a good place to start. But, they will do nothing for lean.

The thicker the sway bar the more resistance to sway. Aftermarket sway bars are thicker than most OE bars. But, before investing in a complete new sway bar, verify that the sway bar bushings and end link bushings are in good condition. Most bushings are rubber. Upgrading to polyurethane bushings may be all you need. Yes, if the bushings are in good condition and you have a lot more sway than other vehicles, sway bars may be in your future. Look at large vehicles in front of you as you drive. See if you sway more than they do.

Replacing the bushings is easy with regular hand tools. Be safe and use jack stands when working under any vehicle.

Brett
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Dianne and Brett Wolfe
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#20 aztec7fan

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 01:33 PM

Hello Everyone,

Just bought a new to us 2002 Kountrystar.

Very exited to enjoy it.

This is our first motorhome, so we're looking forward for do and don'ts with the Family and Maintaining.

All comments and opinions welcome.

Thanks in Advance :rolleyes:


My first suggestions to any new motorhome owner is don't drive it like you used to take trips in your car. When you're younger and take family trips in a car you drive as much as you can each day to get to your destination or your next hotel. Not in a motorhome. You will find that many motorhome owners will usually drive 2-3 hours in the morning, stop for lunch, and then 2-3 hours in the afternoon. This will allow you to get to the campground (assuming you are staying in one) while it's still light, allow you to set up and unwind from driving and possibly go into town for some sight seeing, or sit out under your awning and enjoy the rest of the day.

The motorhoming life is a more relaxed lifestyle.

Also, try not to always drive on the interstates. look at the maps, or your GPS and try to drive through some small towns and "red roads". You will be suprized what you find on the backroads of this country (and Canada and Mexico).
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Chris Guenther
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Westminster, CO
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"Life is just a collection of memories

and memories are like starlight, they go on forever"

-C.W. McCall





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