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Use Of Portable Propane Heaters While Drycamping?


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#1 WhiteEagle

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 03:58 PM

Looked at top 5 pages of threads and only saw one mention about using a small ( 3800-9000 BTU) propane heater in MH while non-hookups camping..... (Such as the most popular Mr. Byddy or Mr. Heater types)

Curious .. how many folks use these to perhaps take the chill out or partially maintain temps in MH rather than starting Gen or running aquahot ?
Supposedly good / safe for indoors but does everyone keep a window cracked... and if so, wouldn't even a slightly open window eliminate the heat benefit ?

Supposedly they have low-O2 shutdown....

Sure no one would use them while driving even with the supposed tipover shutoff but wondering about beneficial use if bookdocking in area where temps might drop to 20's - 40's during evenings...?. Certainly 1# of propane would be less expensive, quieter, etc. than running gen. or aquahot..
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#2 dalltop

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

One thing to consider in low temperatures is how your pipes and tanks are heated. My rear heater circulates air into the basement area to keep my basement holding tanks and waterlines from freezing. If you are only heating your living area in cold weather you may run the risk of freezing pipes depending on your waterlines routing.
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#3 charles10

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 07:17 PM

We have a Buddy, use it when we do not want to use generator.

I set a propane tank in the bay, ran a line under the kitchen sink and sat the heater outside the cabinet out of walkway in the motor home. We keep the bottle turned off until using, saves our main propane. In our previous RV I tapped into the existing propane line. I am paranoid about the cold and do not want to get caught without heat. Our main furnace quit once, took a week to get parts (that was in Houston, TX) don't want that to happen when off in the boonies and not have heat.

If you go to high altitudes the big Buddy works, the little one will not., we do keep a window ajar and never sleep with the Buddy on. First up has to lite the heater, does not replace pushing a button but helps my paranoia.

So far we have not had to worry about plumbing as it has not been cold that long where we are camping.
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#4 desertdeals69

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 09:51 PM

Years ago I used a catalytic propane heater with good results. I think it was a Cat brand.
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#5 rogelling

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:15 PM

Propane heaters should never be used inside a motorhome due to carbon monoxide emissions. People die from CO poisoning every year due to this practice. The smaller the space and the less it exchanges air with the outside as in a tightly enclosed MH, the greater the danger. At the very least you should have a CO monitor and ventilate the spce which nmakes it harder to heat and negates the need for a heater.LP furnaces are exhaust vented to the outside for a reason.
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#6 desertdeals69

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

Propane heaters should never be used inside a motorhome due to carbon monoxide emissions. People die from CO poisoning every year due to this practice. The smaller the space and the less it exchanges air with the outside as in a tightly enclosed MH, the greater the danger. At the very least you should have a CO monitor and ventilate the spce which nmakes it harder to heat and negates the need for a heater.LP furnaces are exhaust vented to the outside for a reason.

The model I used was made for RV use. It had a vent tube to the outside. It worked perfect inside without any problems.
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#7 rogelling

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 01:48 PM

cool (no pun intended)
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#8 dwesr

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:09 PM

One thing to consider in low temperatures is how your pipes and tanks are heated. My rear heater circulates air into the basement area to keep my basement holding tanks and waterlines from freezing. If you are only heating your living area in cold weather you may run the risk of freezing pipes depending on your waterlines routing.

 

 

 

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