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Breaking In A New Mercedes Diesel


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11 replies to this topic

#1 LeeB7

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:33 PM

We are moving from a 2001 38ft Endeavor to a 2013 View Profile 24G (a challange in it's self.)

We will be flying to Iowa from California to pick up our unit and then driving to Pennsylvana to visit our niece, then return to the dealer in Iowa to have any issues repaired that WILL crop up with a new unit before returning to California.

The coach will have less then 10 miles so I will be breaking the Motor in..

I would like advice on the best way to go about this.........

Thanks for your time...... LeeB
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Soon to have a 2013 View Profile 24G

#2 nitehawk

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:41 PM

I used to break in my snowmobiles and my '62 Impala Supersport convertible in the following manner: Up 10 MPH for a mile, Down 5 MPH for a mile, then repeat until I couldn't go any faster. When stopping I would let the engine cool down and then shut off. Restart about an hour later warm up, then repeat cycle. Based on engine size and body type my snowmobiles outran el tigre artic cats. My 327/350Hp Chev was faster than other 327s in town and lasted for over 200,000 miles (running great and no oil burning). Just changed the oil when required.

Other posters may have differing opinions but this has worked for me and my friends very well over the years.
Thermal expansion and contraction, along with oil changes, seems to be the difference.
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#3 LeeB7

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 11:30 PM

Thanks nighthawk.......... :)

But I am talking about a 2013 Diesel
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#4 dave111451

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 09:16 AM

With a diesel big thing is do not let it idle a long time.Agree with thermal cycles but usually with a diesel they say to work them to break them in, do not lug it but use it. Once you have air pressure drive slowly till temp gauge has come up near normal,or at least to 160 degrees.
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#5 nitehawk

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:10 AM

Lee,

I well understood you were referring to diesels. But, thermal expansion and contraction applies to any engine. The oil change after initial break in is critical to removing the small fine metal particles created by the initial wear in of the engine.

I had never even considered how to break in a new engine until I asked an old mechanic at a Cadillac dealership. He told me how and I have used it ever since 1962. All my motorized vehicles ran better, ran faster, got better mileage, and lasted longer than other vehicles of the same genre.
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#6 LeeB7

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:33 AM

Thanks my problem is I am going to be 2000 miles from home when I pick it up and not sure of the conditions I will be in.....
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#7 bm02tj

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 01:41 PM

This new V6 is just about broken in the day you buy it not like engines of old that needed care to break in.

Drive with no lugging and try to vary the rpm do not just put on cruise and like all engines let idle a short time before shutting down.
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#8 Allegiance40x

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 04:39 PM

Do what the owner's manual says. My Cummins manual (and Honda manual) say the initial oil change that we used to do is no longer required.
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#9 nitehawk

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:52 PM

I shudder when I think of all the Cummins main bearing caps we shipped out of the Navistar facility in Waukesha that had chips and burrs. Would it be even remotely possible some of these same chips and burrs could end up in a crankcase?
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#10 LeeB7

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

I am going to take it easy by taking as many back roads as possible to vary the speed and let it cool down a few before shutting down and no lugging...

Thanks for the advice...... LeeB
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#11 WILDEBILL308

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 03:23 PM

Why not see what the manufacture says in the owners Manual and follow that. If you can’t wait call Mercedes and ask them how to brake in the engine.

I would not use any of the “tried and true” methods from 40 – 50 years ago.

New engines are made too much tighter tolerances and much better quality than in the good old days.

Bill
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#12 AprilWhine

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 02:13 PM

Congratulations!

All that is needed is to drive it like you own it. Almost all new vehicles with Electronic Engine Controls take care of the break in for you. Even my Ford Ranger.

The ECU limits rpm and power delivered until you arrive at the mileage that the builder set for full power enable.

On a Mini Cooper it is about 1400 miles, the Ranger was around 2400 miles. Our Navion was already past that point when we bought it, due to delivery miles.

Just get in the coach and enjoy it. It will seem a little down on power, and you will notice when the full power is enabled.

Just drive it and enjoy it. We really enjoyed ours and it never had a flaw, unlike the 40' pusher we replaced it with. We drove ours Coast to Coast, and Border to Border, towing a Mini Cooper behind.

Oh, and the 40' DP is gone also. We downgraded from an 08 DP to a 97 Prevost, and have never looked back.
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