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F448592

Boise To Las Vegas: Early December

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F448592   

Driving from Boise to Las Vegas early December - any road problems/weather concerns to be aware of? We are fairly new to RVing and have a 33 ft gas motorhome. Have heard 93 is the way to go?

How to check weather forecasts, places to stop along the way?

We prefer to drive only 4-5 hrs max per day, is this feasible for this trip?

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Haven't done the 93 route but we went from Vegas to Boise via 15 up through Utah spring of this year. Like you, we only did 4-5 hours a day. We spent a couple days at the KOA in Cedar City UT and saw some really nice sites. Just an option for ya. Good chance you might see more snow that way so that is something you might want to consider. Safe journey.

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ObedB   

Have run US93 south through Jackpot NV, Wells NV, Ely NV and onto Vegas as a trucker. There is a possibility of snow along that route, but it usually doesn't last long on the roads. Six to eight inches in the aforementioned towns are average for December. Roads are fine with little traffic, but I don't think you will find RV accomodations. Jackpot has casinos that will be ok to park in for an overnight stay, but no RV accomodations that I remember. Wells has three Truck Stops that you could probably sleep at. The Loves has a dump station. Don't remember one at the Flying J or the Petro. Ely  has casinos with parking lots that would be ok for some shut eye. Temps could be cold most of the way. Unless your unit is well insulated for winter travel, don't de-winterize until you get to Vegas.

In Ely take US 6 west to NV 318 and then south to rejoin US 93 south to Vegas. Saves maybe 40 or so miles. 

You will be by yourself  a large part of the way in NV, with spotty phone service. Gotta love Vegas in the winter though. Beats the heck out of 106 degrees in August

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ObedB   

As an aside/ southbound on US93 will offer you an opportunity to pull into the Flying J in Wells for some rest. I always went to the back parking row and drove into the spot I wanted. The view from my windshield was a favorite of mine, especially in the winter. High plains, US93 heading south with little traffic, and snow on the " Hole in the Mountains Peak"  is quite picturesque. Not something you normally see in arid Nevada's east. Will always remember it. 11, 306 ft. of snow covered beauty.

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manholt   

US 93, is the second loneliest Hwy. in the US!  However, there are some RV parks now, between Idaho and Las Vegas!

ObedB was looking at that Mountain in his OTR when Moses was parting the Sea! :lol::rolleyes:

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TBUTLER   

My map program shows this to be a 662 mile trip.  I usually figure a net speed for travel at 50 MPH.  I drive faster than that but when you take into account stops for fuel, rest, traffic, road work, etc., that figure works out well for our travel routine.  Yours may be different, keep track of your trip and the actual amount of time driving from beginning to end for each travel day.  See what your figure is to help determine the amount of drive time for future trips. 

Using my figure, this would be a 13 to 14 hour trip.  Breaking that into 4 to 5 hour driving days makes it a three or four day trip.  You should plan for an additional day or two for weather delays should they occur.  The most remote portion of your travels will be from Wells to Las Vegas.  I use All-Stays Camp and RV to find campgrounds.  RV Park Reviews is another good source for finding campgrounds.  A quick survey shows parks at Wells, Ely, Pioche, Caliente and some others south of Caliente.  You should have no problem finding parks that fit your intended travel schedule.  Check to ensure that the parks you choose are open during the winter and determine if they have water available during the winter.

Given the 4 to 5 day length, you should be able to get good weather forecasts for most of your trip before you start out.  Look at the weekly forecasts for the area.  A simple and reliable source for weather is the Weather Channel (DirectTV Channel 362) or Weather Nation (DirecTV Channel 361).  That will give you an idea of any big storm movement.  Delaying your departure for a day or two to let any storm pass through is a good choice.  A day to clear any snow and there should be good travels for several days following the storm. 

Stock your coach with a good supply of food and water in case of breakdown.  If you don't have a toad (towed car or truck), you should have an alternate plan for getting emergency help as much of the area you are traveling may have little or no cell phone service.  Let a relative or friend know your exact itinerary and stick to it.  Advise them to expect a call or series of calls to let them know you are safe and proceeding on your trip.  If they don't get a call, they should be able to alert police to your status and advise where you should be on the trip.  I would expect that there would be daily police patrols along your route but it never hurts to be prepared with an alternate plan.  There will also be fellow travelers who can assist you if you need help.  A large printed sign (HELP - CALL POLICE) or other message,  to place in the window may assist in getting help.  This will allow you to convey a message if you are concerned about the people who have stopped to offer assistance (Deliverance). 

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ObedB   

It is a two day  trip if you commit to a 300plus day. In an 18 wheeler, it was a one day ride for me. Was honoring the OPs choice when I jumped in here. I would be surprised to find anything resembling an RV park along that route in the winter that is open. Not enough RV traffic to stay open.I did say that you will be alone much of the way. If a coach can run in the winter with full water and some liquid in the black and grey water tanks without freezing, the Loves in Wells has a dump station and probably a source of fresh water. Should get the OP through to warmer weather in Las Vegas. The other choice would be motels.😉

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ObedB   

I do recall getting a friendly wave from  a Nevada State Patrol officer when he passed me heading north one winter on 93. Guess he was glad to see another person. 😎Might have been December when that happened.

There is a second choice, but it is 120 miles further. Take US 95  south out of the Boise area. Runs you over into Oregon's SE corner and then south to Winnemucca. Head west on I-80 to Exit 83 and then south on US95 to Las Vegas. Once you get south of Fallon aways, traffic will increase and you won't be so lonely. US 95 is the main road route between Vegas and Reno.

When I wound up in Winnemucca and was heading south, I almost always headed east to Battle Mountain NV and south on NV305. Another lonely road by the way.

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manholt   

Area 51 is off of US 95!  Slight diversion, no matter what you heard, that road is still as secure as ever...No, you can not take it to Broom Lake! :o

Now, have anyone but me noticed that Byron never say's what year he was rolling an 18 wheeler across that stretch of road.  Could have been with Barney of the Flintstones! :lol::blink::wacko:

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ObedB   

My experience with northern Nevada roads started in 1980. A road less traveled is always a favorite for me. Fewer idiots per mile.😏 Top Gun school is in Fallon. Never know what you might see in that area.

Edited by obedb

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ObedB   

Had to do something because when Tom Butler mentioned Deliverance, I knew that he was having a panic attack.🙄 My second choice with an additional 120 miles of travel is probably best for the inexperienced. As far as Nevada roads, I enjoy them. Frequently found loads from the northwest to Arizona in the winter because I liked the weather in the wintertime south west. Loads from produce producing areas heading east that paid well were usually easy to find. That is after a day or two in the sun.😉

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